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  1.  8
    Recovering the Snorra Edda: On Playing Gods, Loki, and the Importance of History.Mathias Moosbrugger - 2010 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 17:105-120.
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  2.  27
    Raymund Schwager's Maieutics: "Mimesis and Freedom" and the Transformation of René Girard.Mathias Moosbrugger - 2014 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 21:55-65.
    In a letter to Raymund Schwager from October 1991, René Girard arrived at a very critical verdict concerning his 1978 book Things Hidden since the Foundation of the World—the very book about which he had written almost one and a half decades before, that it contained the “essence of what I have to say” and “clarified and dissipated former misunderstandings.”1 The reason for this change of mind was Raymund Schwager himself, who had sent him the manuscript of a paper on (...)
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    The Future of Modernity—Silver Linings or Heart of Darkness?: René Girard's Apocalyptic Thinking Revisited.Mathias Moosbrugger - 2015 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 22:89-105.
    In one of his brilliant essays, Gilbert Keith Chesterton—famous English author of the early twentieth century and master of paradoxical reasoning in his intellectual battle for the truth of Christianity1—outlines the fascinating story of a very strange adventurer. Having completely lost orientation after a long, stormy journey, this adventurer reaches the safe shores of his homeland, proudly believing to have discovered a yet-unknown country. Even stranger and more fantastic is his constant astonishment in rediscovering exactly those places, people, and things (...)
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    Historian in Disguise: On Derrida, Durkheim and the Intellectual Ambition of René Girard.Mathias Moosbrugger - 2019 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 24 (1):5-24.
    This paper rereads René Girard’s intellectual biography as a process first of apparent dissociation, and then of not so very much apparent, though quite solid, recovery of historical thinking. A trained historian-archivist, the young Girard began to massively rearrange his intellectual outlook by adopting methods and perspectives drawn from both very modern thinkers such as Jacques Derrida, and classical thinkers such as Émile Durkheim. In developing his signature theory of the scapegoat mechanism, however, Girard’s intellectual biography eventually came full circle. (...)
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