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Nancy Worman [5]Nancy Baker Worman [1]
  1.  17
    The Body as Argument: Helen in Four Greek Texts.Nancy Worman - 1997 - Classical Antiquity 16 (1):151-203.
    Certain Greek texts depict Helen in a manner that connects her elusive body with the elusive maneuvers of the persuasive story. Her too-mobile body signals in these texts the obscurity of agency in the seduction scene and serves as a device for tracking the dynamics of desire. In so doing this body propels poetic narrative and gives structure to persuasive argumentation. Although the female figure in traditional texts is always the object of male representation, in this study I examine a (...)
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  2.  19
    Insult and Oral Excess in the Disputes Between Aeschines and Demosthenes.Nancy Worman - 2004 - American Journal of Philology 125 (1):1-25.
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    Rape and the Politics of Consent in Classical Athens (Book).Nancy Worman - 2003 - American Journal of Philology 124 (4):617-620.
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    Theophrastus: Characters.Nancy Baker Worman - 2007 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 100 (4):470-472.
  5.  5
    Barker Entering the Agon: Dissent and Authority in Homer, Historiography and Tragedy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Pp. Xiii, 433. £70. 9780199542710. [REVIEW]Nancy Worman - 2010 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 130:195-196.
  6.  15
    The Animal Part: Human and Other Animals in the Poetic Imagination.Nancy Worman - 2012 - American Journal of Philology 133 (4):696-699.
    Mark Payne’s elegant and unusual book addresses an elusive topic: human perceptions of animal consciousness. Focusing largely on literary artists’ senses of other animals, Payne initially approaches the conundrum of how these artists devise ways to bridge this gap from a broad but distinctly personal perspective. He takes the reader with him out into a natural setting, complete with details such as the beers he drank in the evening and the driftwood on which he hung his clothes to swim, and (...)
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