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  1.  7
    Research ethics courses as a vaccination against a toxic research environment or culture.Nicole Shu Ling Yeo-Teh & Bor Luen Tang - 2021 - Research Ethics 17 (1):55-65.
    Hofmann and Holm’s recent survey on issues of research misconduct with PhD graduates culminated with a notable conclusion by the authors: ‘ Scientific misconduct seems to be an environmental issue as much as a matter of personal integrity’. Here, we re-emphasise the usefulness of an education-based countermeasure against toxic research environments or cultures that promote unethical practices amongst the younger researchers. We posit that an adequately conducted course in research ethics and integrity, with a good dose of case studies and (...)
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  2.  5
    Moral obligations in conducting stem cell-based therapy trials for autism spectrum disorder.Nicole Shu Ling Yeo-Teh & Bor Luen Tang - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Unregulated patient treatments and approved clinical trials have been conducted with haematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells for children with autism spectrum disorder. While the former direct-to-consumer practice is usually considered rogue and should be legally constrained, regulated clinical trials could also be ethically questionable. Here, we outline principal objections against these trials as they are currently conducted. Notably, these often lack a clear rationale for how transplanted cells may confer a therapeutic benefit in ASD, and thus, have ill-defined (...)
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  3.  4
    Perceived publication pressure and research misconduct: should we be too bothered with a causal relationship?Nicole Shu Ling Yeo-Teh & Bor Luen Tang - 2022 - Research Ethics 18 (4):329-338.
    Publication pressure has been touted to promote questionable research practices (QRP) and scientific or research misconduct (RM). However, logically attractively as it is, there is no unequivocal evidence for this notion, and empirical studies have produced conflicting results. Other than difficulties in obtaining unbiased empirical data, a direct causal relationship between perceived publication pressure (PPP) and QRP/RM is inherently difficult to establish, because the former is a complex biopsychosocial construct that is variedly influenced by multiple personal and environmental factors. To (...)
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  4. A Review of Scientific Ethics Issues Associated with the Recently Approved Drugs for Alzheimer’s Disease. [REVIEW]Bor Luen Tang & Nicole Shu Ling Yeo-Teh - 2023 - Science and Engineering Ethics 29 (1):1-18.
    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the devastating and most prevailing underlying cause for age-associated dementia, has no effective disease-modifying treatment. The last approved drug for the relief of AD symptoms was in 2003. The recent approval of sodium oligomannate (GV-971, 2019) in China and the human antibody aducanumab in the USA (ADUHELM, 2021) therefore represent significant breakthroughs, albeit ones that are fraught with controversy. Here, we explore potential scientific ethics issues associated with GV-971 and aducanumab’s development and approval. While these issues may (...)
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