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Randolph Wheeler
Towson University
  1.  34
    Kantian Imperatives and Phenomenology's Original Forces: Kant's Imperatives and the Directives of Contemporary Phenomenology.Randolph C. Wheeler - 2008 - Council for Research in Values and Philosophy.
    Kant's Imperatives -- Imperatives in Kant's metaphysics of morals -- Imperatives in the critique of judgment -- The role of reason and freedom in Kant's doctrine -- Contemporary phenomenology's response to Kant's Imperatives -- Imperatives in Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of perception -- Merleau-Ponty and Kant's Imperatives -- Imperative style and levels -- Imperatives in Levinas's doctrines of sensibility and alterity -- Sensation and sensibility -- Alterity, infinity, exteriority, and asymmetry -- Alterity and language -- Privileged heteronomy versus autonomy -- Alphonso Lingis (...)
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    Lingis, Alphonso. The Imperative.Randolph C. Wheeler - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (2):462-463.
  3.  21
    Hegel's Idea of Freedom.Randolph C. Wheeler - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 54 (3):673-675.
    By focusing on Sittlichkeit, or ethical life, in Hegels mature period, Alan Patten offers an extensive interpretation of Hegelian freedom as self-actualization rather than as the limited fulfillment of social and political roles. Patten admits that there are obvious difficulties in seeing freedom at work in the Sittlichkeit thesis. For instance, Hegel attributes the individuals morality to the duties imposed on him by his social station. Increasing the difficulty in Pattens case for individual freedom, Hegel argues at length in the (...)
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    The Imperative. [REVIEW]Randolph C. Wheeler - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (2):462-462.
    In The Imperative, Lingis not only critiques Kant’s famous moral imperative but also attempts to rectify the imperatives of phenomenology’s “things themselves.” For Lingis, neither empiricism’s positivist physical determinist doctrines nor the existential assessments of perception as an exercise of freedom in the positing of perceptions are satisfying accounts. Lingis wants rather to show that such interactions of humans with their environment are best understood as responses to the directions emanating from the environment. These responses are thus neither the reactions (...)
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