4 found
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  1.  13
    The Legacy of Michael Oakeshott.Robert Devigne - 1999 - Political Theory 27 (1):131-139.
  2.  23
    Building Bridges Across the Channel: J.S. Mill's Theory of Justice.Robert Devigne - 2008 - History of Political Thought 29 (4):635-661.
    John Stuart Mill's theory of justice has received less critical attention than many other features of his work, and yet it constitutes a crucial part of his project to rebut Kant's and other Continental thinkers' charge that British empiricism is incapable of cultivating a genuine morality. Here I explain that the problem of justice preoccupied Mill throughout his lifetime, and that wrestling with this question directly contributes to Mill building bridges between British empiricism's and Kant's conception of the moral conscience, (...)
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  3.  11
    Cultivating the Individual and Society.Robert Devigne - 2006 - History of Political Thought 27 (1):91-121.
    Can the older, virtue-centred tradition of the ancients be made to mesh with the modern political, jurisprudential and economic focus on human equality and freedom? Can empiricism's grounding of human freedom in the natural right of each individual to secure his self-preservation and self-interest be reconciled with Kant's grounding of freedom in the capacity of human beings to act out of respect for the rational moral law? Mill thought so, and his work as a whole attests to the ambition and (...)
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  4. Reforming Liberalism: J.S. Mill's Use of Ancient, Religious, Liberal, and Romantic Moralities.Robert Devigne - 2006 - Yale University Press.
    In _Reforming Liberalism_, Robert Devigne challenges prevailing interpretations of the political and moral thought of John Stuart Mill and the theoretical underpinnings of modern liberal philosophy. He explains how Mill drew from ancient and romantic thought as well as past religious practices to reconcile conflicts and antinomies that were hobbling traditional liberalism. The book shows that Mill, regarded as a seminal writer in the liberal tradition, critiques liberalism’s weaknesses with a forcefulness usually associated with its well-known critics. Devigne explores Mill’s (...)
     
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