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Scott Brenton
La Trobe University
  1.  27
    Animal Activists, Civil Disobedience and Global Responses to Transnational Injustice.Siobhan O’Sullivan, Clare McCausland & Scott Brenton - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (3):261-280.
    Traditionally, acts of civil disobedience are understood as a mechanism by which citizens may express dissatisfaction with a law of their country. That expression will typically be morally motivated, non-violent and aimed at changing their government’s policy, practice or law. Building on existing work, in this paper we explore the limits of one well-received definition of civil disobedience by considering the challenging case of the actions of animal activists at sea. Drawing on original interviews with advocates associated with Sea Shepherd, (...)
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  2.  12
    Consumers and Certification Schemes: The Ethics of Global Production and Trade.Scott Brenton - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (6):755-784.
    Certification schemes and labels such as the Forest Stewardship Council, Fairtrade, and Rainforest Alliance are market-based mechanisms designed to harness consumer power in economically developed countries to influence companies to improve the economic, social and environmental welfare of producers, workers and communities in economically developing countries. However, consumers are largely not convinced that certification schemes are acting in the interests of developing countries, because consumers have different understandings of the ethics of global trade. Drawing on the results of six semi-structured (...)
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  3.  53
    Trespass, Animals and Democratic Engagement.Clare McCausland, Siobhan O’Sullivan & Scott Brenton - 2013 - Res Publica 19 (3):205-221.
    Since at least the 1970s, one of the stock standard tools in the animal protection movement’s arsenal has been illegal entry into factory farms and animal research facilities. This activity has been followed by the publication of images and footage captured inside those otherwise socially invisible places. This activity presents a conundrum: trespass is illegal and it is an apparent violation of private property rights. In this paper we argue that trespass onto private property can be justified as an act (...)
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