12 found
Order:
  1.  12
    Spontaneity, Perspectivism, and Anti-Intellectualism in the Zhuangzi.Wai Wai Chiu - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (3):393-409.
    Contemporary Anglophone scholarship on the Zhuangzi 莊子 tends to reject intellectualism, the view that all knowledge is propositional. Scholars usually state that Zhuangzi values practical knowledge more than propositional knowledge. This valuation, however, seems to presuppose that the Zhuangzi or its interpreters must recognize the distinction between these two kinds of knowledge. In this article, I argue that Zhuangzi sees all knowledge as practical, and if we situate him in the contemporary philosophical field we can extract several ideas from the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  31
    Zhuangzi's Knowing-How and Skepticism.Wai Wai Chiu - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 68 (4):1062-1084.
    One area of focus in contemporary debates on the Zhuangzi is whether the text endorses some kind of skepticism. For example, in chapter 2, Wang Ni expresses doubt toward "benevolence and rightness" and "the paths of right and wrong." He refuses to claim that there is something of which all things will agree to be right. However, the text repeatedly employs terms like "great knowledge" or "authentic knowledge", which hint at something endorsed or exalted by the text, if not right (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  8
    Ming in the Zhuangzi Neipian : Enlightened Engagement.Karyn L. Lai & Wai Wai Chiu - unknown
    In this article, we present an account of ming 明 in the Zhuangzi's Neipian in light of the disagreements among the thinkers of the time. We suggest that ming is associated with the Daoist sage's vision: he sees through the debaters' attempts to win the debates. We propose that ming is primarily a meta-epistemological stance, that is, the sage understands the nature of the debates and does not enter the fray; therefore he does not share the thinkers' anxieties. The sage (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  39
    Zhuangzi’s Idea of ‘Spirit’: Acting and ‘Thinging Things’ Without Self-Assertion.Wai Wai Chiu - 2016 - Asian Philosophy 26 (1):38-51.
    ABSTRACTIn contrast to his contemporaries who take the heart–mind as the ruler of a person, Zhuangzi suggests that one’s action is guided by the spirit. Questions arise as one articulates the function of spirit and its relationship with the heart–mind. In this article, I articulate the relationship between heart–mind and spirit to show three points: first, spirit is a kind of qi 氣 that can be tied or run smoothly, or rather the mechanism triggered by the functioning of smooth qi. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  7
    Ming in the Zhuangzi Neipian: Enlightened Engagement.Karyn L. Lai & Wai Wai Chiu - 2013 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):527-543.
    In this article, we present an account of ming 明 in the Zhuangzi's Neipian in light of the disagreements among the thinkers of the time. We suggest that ming is associated with the Daoist sage's vision: he sees through the debaters' attempts to win the debates. We propose that ming is primarily a meta-epistemological stance, that is, the sage understands the nature of the debates and does not enter the fray; therefore he does not share the thinkers' anxieties. The sage (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  99
    Jian Ai and the Mohist Attack of Early Confucianism.Wai Wai Chiu - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (5):425-437.
    In Chinese pre-Qin period, Mohism was the first school that challenged Confucianism. A common view is that Mohists attacked Confucianism by proposing jian ai, often translated as “universal love,” that opposes Confucian “graded love”. The Confucian-Mohist debate on ethics is often regarded as a debate between Mohist “universal love,” on the one hand; and Confucian emphasis on family and kinship, on the other. However, it is misleading to translate jian ai as “universal love,” as it distorts our understanding of the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  19
    Zhuangzi’s Idea of “Spirit” : Self, Thinging Things and the Nourishment of Life.Wai Wai Chiu - unknown
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  22
    Assessment of Li 利 in the Mencius and the Mozi.Wai Wai Chiu - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):199-214.
    The attitude toward li 利 is often identified as a key difference between the Mencius 孟子 and the Mozi 墨子. A common view is that for the Mencius, rightness (yi 義) and li are incompatible; but for the Mozi they are not necessarily so. In this paper I argue that the Mencius and the Mozi are in broad agreement on the issue of li, and their attitudes toward li are not as different as may seem at first glance. If we (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  12
    Goblet Words and Indeterminacy : A Writing Style That is Free of Commitment.Wai Wai Chiu - unknown
    The Zhuangzi is a collection of ancient Chinese anecdotes and fables that serves as a foundational Daoist text. The style in which it is written is significant because it obscures rather than reveals the text’s philosophic positions. If the text cannot be translated into plain language while preserving its content, as the Mozi or the Mencius generally can be, then the writing style is not merely rhetorical. The style is itself indispensable to the content. In this study, I analyse a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  10
    Zhuangzi and the Co-Existence with Nature : Going Beyond a Human Perspective.Wai Wai Chiu - unknown
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  6
    Review of Chenyang Li, The Confucian Philosophy of Harmony. [REVIEW]Wai Wai Chiu - 2014 - Sophia 53 (4):579-580.
    Since the beginning of the 21st century, China has been trying to establish its cultural image by drawing on its traditions. Various ideas from the past have been redefined to fit contemporary discourses and practises. ‘Harmony’ is certainly one such repurposed concept. Its popularity is highly controversial, especially because the PRC government has been trying to use the idea of ‘he xie ’ to justify many of its policies. Interest in the idea’s traditional meaning is growing as people seek to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Skill and Mastery: Philosophical Stories From the Zhuangzi.Karyn Lai & Wai Wai Chiu (eds.) - 2019 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This valuable collection of illuminating analysis of skill stories from the Zhuangzi, a 4th century BCE Daoist text opens up new lines of inquiry in comparative East-West philosophical debates on skill, cultivation and mastery, as well as cross-disciplinary debates in psychology, cognitive science and philosophy.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark