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  1.  37
    Some Ethical Implications of Individual Competitiveness.Peter E. Mudrack, James M. Bloodgood & William H. Turnley - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (3):347-359.
    This study examined some ethical implications of two different individual competitive orientations. Winning is crucially important in hypercompetitiveness , whereas a personal development (PD) perspective considers competition as a means to self-discovery and self-improvement. In a sample of 263 senior-level undergraduate business students, survey results suggested that hypercompetitiveness was generally associated with “poor ethics” and PD competitiveness was linked with “high ethics”. For example, hypercompetitive individuals generally saw nothing wrong with self-interested gain at the expense of others, but PD competitors (...)
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  2.  86
    The Influence of Ethics Instruction, Religiosity, and Intelligence on Cheating Behavior.James M. Bloodgood, William H. Turnley & Peter Mudrack - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):557-571.
    This study examines the influence of ethics instruction, religiosity, and intelligence on cheating behavior. A sample of 230 upper level, undergraduate business students had the opportunity to increase their chances of winning money in an experimental situation by falsely reporting their task performance. In general, the results indicate that students who attended worship services more frequently were less likely to cheat than those who attended worship services less frequently, but that students who had taken a course in business ethics were (...)
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  3.  56
    Ethics Instruction and the Perceived Acceptability of Cheating.James M. Bloodgood, William H. Turnley & Peter E. Mudrack - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):23-37.
    This study examined whether undergraduate students' perceptions regarding the acceptability of cheating were influenced by the amount of ethics instruction the students had received and/or by their personality. The results, from a sample of 230 upper-level undergraduate students, indicated that simply taking a business ethics course did not have a significant influence on students' views regarding cheating. On the other hand, Machiavellianism was positively related to perceiving that two forms of cheating were acceptable. Moreover, in testing for moderating relationships, the (...)
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