Search results for 'Bilge Say' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  18
    Bilge Say & Varol Akman (1997). Current Approaches to Punctuation in Computational Linguistics. Philosophical Explorations.
    Some recent studies in computational linguistics have aimed to take advantage of various cues presented by punctuation marks. This short survey is intended to summarise these research efforts and additionally, to outline a current perspective for the usage and functions of punctuation marks. We conclude by presenting an information-based framework for punctuation, influenced by treatments of several related phenomena in computational linguistics.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  6
    Steven E. Kaplan, Janet A. Samuels & Jeffrey Cohen (2015). An Examination of the Effect of CEO Social Ties and CEO Reputation on Nonprofessional Investors’ Say-on-Pay Judgments. Journal of Business Ethics 126 (1):103-117.
    CEO compensation has received much attention from both academics and regulators. However, academics have given scant attention to understanding judgments about CEO compensation by third parties such as investors. Our study contributes to the ethics literature on CEO compensation by examining whether judgments about CEO compensation are influenced by two aspects of a company’s tone at the top—social ties between the CEO and members of the Executive Compensation Committee and the CEO’s Reputation, particularly for financial reporting and disclosures. Although, stock (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  3.  23
    Holly Andersen (forthcoming). What Would Hume Say? Regularities, Laws, and Mechanisms. In Phyllis Ilari & Stuart Glennan (eds.), What Would Hume Say? Regularities, Laws, and Mechanisms.
    This chapter examines the relationship between laws and mechanisms as approaches to characterising generalizations and explanations in science. I give an overview of recent historical discussions where laws failed to satisfy stringent logical criteria, opening the way for mechanisms to be investigated as a way to explain regularities in nature. This followed by a critical discussion of contemporary debates about the role of laws versus mechanisms in describing versus explaining regularities. I conclude by offering new arguments for two roles for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  84
    Joshua Rasmussen (2012). Presentists May Say Goodbye to A-Properties. Analysis 72 (2):270-276.
    Philosophers of time say that if presentism is true (i.e. if reality is comprised solely of presently existing things), then a complete description of reality must contain tensed terms, such as ‘was’, ‘presently is’ and ‘will be’. I counter this viewpoint by explaining how the presentist may de-tense our talk about times. I argue, furthermore, that, since the A-theory of time denies the success of any such de-tensing strategy, presentism is not a version of the A-theory – contrary to the (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  5.  98
    John MacFarlane (2000). What Does It Mean to Say That Logic is Formal? Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    Much philosophy of logic is shaped, explicitly or implicitly, by the thought that logic is distinctively formal and abstracts from material content. The distinction between formal and material does not appear to coincide with the more familiar contrasts between a priori and empirical, necessary and contingent, analytic and synthetic—indeed, it is often invoked to explain these. Nor, it turns out, can it be explained by appeal to schematic inference patterns, syntactic rules, or grammar. What does it mean, then, to say (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  6.  43
    Lynne Tirrell (2015). "Listen to What You Say": Rwanda's Postgenocide Language Policies. New England Journal of Public Policy 27 (4).
    Freedom of expression is considered a basic human right, and yet most countries have restrictions on speech they deem harmful. Following the genocide of the Tutsi, Rwanda passed a constitution (2003) and laws against hate speech and other forms of divisionist language (2008, 2013). Understanding how language shaped “recognition harms” that both constitute and fuel genocide also helps account for political decisions to limit “divisionist” discourse. When we speak, we make expressive commitments, which are commitments to the viability and value (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Charlie Kurth (2013). What Do Our Critical Practices Say About the Nature of Morality? Philosophical Studies 166 (1):45-64.
    A prominent argument for moral realism notes that we are inclined to accept realism in science because scientific inquiry supports a robust set of critical practices—error, improvement, explanation, and the like. It then argues that because morality displays a comparable set of critical practices, a claim to moral realism is just as warranted as a claim to scientific realism. But the argument is only as strong as its central analogy—and here there is trouble. If the analogy between the critical practices (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  18
    Susan B. Rubin (1998). When Doctors Say No: The Battleground of Medical Futility. Indiana University Press.
    Who should decide? In When Doctors Say No, philosopher and bioethicist Rubin examines this controversial issue.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  9.  74
    Muel Kaptein (2004). Business codes of multinational firms: What do they say? Journal of Business Ethics 50 (1):13-31.
    Business codes are an oft-cited management instrument. But how common are codes among multinationals? And what is their content? In an unprecedented study, the codes of the largest corporations in the world have been collected and thoroughly analyzed. This paper presents the results of that study. Of the two hundred largest companies in the world, 52.5% have a code. More than half of these codes describe company responsibilities regarding quality of products and services (67%), adherence to local laws and regulations (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   131 citations  
  10. Jerry A. Fodor & Jerrold J. Katz (1963). The Availability of What We Say. Philosophical Review 72 (1):57-71.
    Fodor and katz criticize cavell's position on the relation between ordinary language philosophy and empirical investigations of ordinary language, In "must we mean what we say?," _inquiry, Volume 1, Pages 172-212, And "the availability of wittgenstein's later philosophy," "philosophical review", Volume 71, Pages 67-93. Cavell holds that disagreements between ordinary language philosophers over grammar and semantics are in no sense empirical. Fodor and katz show that ordinary language philosophers are engaged in empirical investigation. (staff).
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  11.  90
    Peter Milne (2007). On Gödel Sentences and What They Say. Philosophia Mathematica 15 (2):193-226.
    Proofs of Gödel's First Incompleteness Theorem are often accompanied by claims such as that the gödel sentence constructed in the course of the proof says of itself that it is unprovable and that it is true. The validity of such claims depends closely on how the sentence is constructed. Only by tightly constraining the means of construction can one obtain gödel sentences of which it is correct, without further ado, to say that they say of themselves that they are unprovable (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  12. Jacob Beck (2013). Why We Can't Say What Animals Think. Philosophical Psychology 26 (4):520–546.
    Realists about animal cognition confront a puzzle. If animals have real, contentful cognitive states, why can’t anyone say precisely what the contents of those states are? I consider several possible resolutions to this puzzle that are open to realists, and argue that the best of these is likely to appeal to differences in the format of animal cognition and human language.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Richard J. Arneson, The Supposed Right to a Democratic Say.
    Democratic instrumentalism is the combination of two ideas. One is instrumentalism regarding political arrangements: the form of government that ought to be instituted and sustained in a political society is the one the consequences of whose operation would be better than those of any feasible alternative. The second idea is the claim that under modern conditions democratic political institutions would be best according to the instrumentalist norm and ought to be established. “Democratic instrumentalism” is not a catchy political slogan apt (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  4
    Rosemarie D. L. C. Bernabe, Ghislaine J. M. W. Van Thiel & Johannes J. M. Van Delden (2016). What Do International Ethics Guidelines Say in Terms of the Scope of Medical Research Ethics? BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-18.
    BackgroundIn research ethics, the most basic question would always be, “which is an ethical issue, which is not?” Interestingly, depending on which ethics guideline we consult, we may have various answers to this question. Though we already have several international ethics guidelines for biomedical research involving human participants, ironically, we do not have a harmonized document which tells us what these various guidelines say and shows us the areas of consensus. In this manuscript, we attempted to do just that.MethodsWe extracted (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  71
    Adrian Brasoveanu & Donka F. Farkas, Say Reports, Assertion Events and Meaning Dimensions.
    In this paper, we study the parameters that come into play when assessing the truth conditions of say reports and contrast them with belief attributions. We argue that these conditions are sensitive in intricate ways to the connection between the interpretation of the complement of say and the properties of the reported speech act. There are three general areas this exercise is relevant to, besides the immediate issue of understanding the meaning of say: (i) the discussion shows the need to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  10
    Louis Quéré (2012). Is There Any Good Reason to Say Goodbye to “Ethnomethodology”? Human Studies 35 (2):305-325.
    This paper is an essay about Harold Garfinkel's heritage. It outlines a response to Eric Livingston's proposal to say goodbye to ethnomethodology as pertaining to the sociological tradition; and it rejects part of Melvin Pollner's diagnosis about the changes occurred in ethnomethodological working. If it agrees with Pollner about the idea that something of the initial ethnomethodology's program has been left aside after the "work studies" turn, it asserts that such a turn has nonetheless made possible authentic discoveries. So the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  54
    Luca Baptista (2014). Say What? On Grice On What Is Said. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):1-19.
    : In this paper I argue that there is a very important, though often neglected, dissimilarity between the two Gricean conceptions of ‘what is said’: the one presented in his William James Lectures and the one sketched in the ‘Retrospective Epilogue’ to his book Studies in the Way of Words. The main problem lies with the idea of speakers' commitment to what they say and how this is to be related to the conventional, or standard, meaning of the sentences uttered (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  23
    Stanley Bates & Ted Cohen (1972). More on What We Say. Metaphilosophy 3 (1):1–24.
    This article consists of two important parts. The first is a specific defense of some of the central claims made by stanley cavell in "must we mean what we say" against the criticisms of fodor and katz in "the availability of what we say." the major issue concerns the question of whether evidence of some sort is needed to support a claim by a native speaker about what we mean when we say something. Further speculations on this topic occupy the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  19. Reed Richter (2002). What Science Can and Cannot Say: The Problems with Methodological Naturalism. Reports of the National Center for Science Education 22 (Jan-Apr 2002):18-22.
    This paper rejects a view of science called "methodological naturalism." -/- According to many defenders of mainstream science and Darwinian evolution, anti-evolution critics--creationists and intelligent design proponents--are conceptually and epistemologically confusing science and religion, a supernatural view of world. These defenders of evolution contend that doing science requires adhering to a methodology that is strictly and essentially naturalistic: science is essentially committed to "methodological naturalism" and assumes that all the phenomena it investigates are entirely natural and consistent with the laws (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20.  29
    Alan L. T. Paterson (2002). Does Hegel Have Anything to Say to Modern Mathematical Philosophy? Idealistic Studies 32 (2):143-158.
    This paper argues that Hegel has much to say to modern mathematical philosophy, although the Hegelian perspective needs to be substantially developed to incorporate within it the extensive advances in post-Hegelian mathematics and its logic. Key to that perspective is the self-referential character of the fundamental concepts of philosophy. The Hegelian approach provides a framework for answering the philosophical problems, discussed by Kurt Gödel in his paper on Bertrand Russell, which arise out of the existence in mathematics of self-referential, non-constructive (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  12
    Michael Drolet (2003). Democracy and Political Economy: Tocqueville's Thoughts on J.-B. Say and T.R. Malthus. History of European Ideas 29 (2):159-181.
    This essay examines the intellectual origins of Tocqueville's thoughts on political economy. It argues that Tocqueville believed political economy was crucial to what he called the ‘new science of politics’, and it explores his first forays into the discipline by examining his studies of J.-B. Say and T.R. Malthus. The essay shows how Tocqueville was initially attracted to Say's approach as it provided him with a rigorous analytical framework with which to examine American democracy. Though he incorporated important aspects of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  26
    Herman Tennessen (1959). What Should We Say? Inquiry 2 (1-4):265 – 290.
    Preliminary summaries of a few empirio?semantical investigations1 concerning such sentences as: can we say x, should we ever (ordinarily) say x, x is self?evident (tautological, contradictory, nonsensical), P does not know what be is talking about, x is voluntary (involuntary) and: that is no excuse.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  23.  13
    Delia Belleri (2014). You Can Say What You Think: Vindicating the Effability of Our Thoughts. Synthese 191 (18):4431-4450.
    The thesis of Ineffability has it that no proposition can be fully expressed by a sentence, this meaning that no sentence-type, or even sentence-token whose indexicality and ambiguities have been resolved, can fully encode a proposition. The thesis of the propositionality of thoughts has it that thoughts are propositional. An implication of the joint endorsement of these two theses is that thoughts are ineffable. The aim of this paper is to argue that this is not the case: there are effable (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  1
    William Day (2010). Wanting to Say Something: Aspect-Blindness and Language. In William Day & Víctor J. Krebs (eds.), Seeing Wittgenstein Anew. Cambridge University Press
    "Lest one think that the focus on aspect-seeing in Wittgenstein is only a means to more contemporary philosophical ends, one ought to read Day’s remarkable 'Wanting to Say Something: Aspect-Blindness and Language'. Day considers the issue of aspect-blindness, arguing that universal aspect-blindness is impossible for beings with language. Specifically, he shows that a child’s first attempt at language, at trying “bloh” for “ball,” is neither an indication that the child sees the ball for the first time, nor an indication that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Cara Spencer (2002). Representing What Others Say. ProtoSociology 17:26-45.
    The semantics of belief reports has recently received a great deal of attention.1 Speech reports have largely been left behind in this discussion. Here I extend a familiar recent account of attitude reports, the Russellian theory, to the special case of speech reports. I then consider how it compares to Davidson’s paratactic theory with respect to a few examples that raise special problems about speech reports. Neither theory accounts for everything we want to say about these cases. I suggest that (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  25
    Edward James (2012). Too Soon to Say. Philosophy 87 (03):421-442.
    (1) Rupert Read charges that Rawls culpably overlooks the politicized Euthyphro: Do we accept our political perspective because it is right or is it right because we accept it? (2) This charge brings up the question of the deficiency dilemma: Do others disagree with us because of our failures or theirs? —where the two dilemmas appear to be independent of each other and lead to the questions of the logic of deficiency, moral epistemic deficiency, epistemic peers, and the hardness of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  14
    Webster Ken (2013). What Might We Say About a Circular Economy? Some Temptations to Avoid If Possible. World Futures 69 (7-8):542-554.
    (2013). What Might We Say about a Circular Economy? Some Temptations to Avoid if Possible. World Futures: Vol. 69, Reclaiming Free Enterprise: The Scientific and Human Story, pp. 542-554.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  5
    Alan L. T. Paterson (2002). Does Hegel Have Anything to Say to Modern Mathematical Philosophy? Idealistic Studies 32 (2):143-158.
    This paper argues that Hegel has much to say to modern mathematical philosophy, although the Hegelian perspective needs to be substantially developed to incorporate within it the extensive advances in post-Hegelian mathematics and its logic. Key to that perspective is the self-referential character of the fundamental concepts of philosophy. The Hegelian approach provides a framework for answering the philosophical problems, discussed by Kurt Gödel in his paper on Bertrand Russell, which arise out of the existence in mathematics of self-referential, non-constructive (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  6
    Wenqing Zhao (2014). Is Contemporary Chinese Society Inhumane? What Mencius and Empirical Psychology Have to Say. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):343-360.
    This essay discusses the tragic news story of a Chinese toddler, Xiao Yueyue 小悅悅, in light of Mencius’ ethical philosophy and modern studies of moral psychology, which help in understanding the problem of passive bystanders that has long vexed the Chinese public. Mencius never said that every person would act to help when a child is in danger; he did not even say that people would feel sympathetic for every child in a real life dangerous situation. He simply asserted the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  14
    Peter Gratton (2011). What More Is There to Say? Revisiting Agamben's Depiction of Homo Sacer. The European Legacy 16 (5):599 - 613.
    This article argues that Agamben's ?paradigmatic method? leads to particular choices in his depiction of the figure of the homo sacer. Reviewing this project also suggests that there's more to history?the example given is the story of homo sacer?than Agamben's method would ever leave us to say. In other words, there are still resources in the tradition for something new, and thus there is much more left to say about its legacies.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  4
    Kevin Hart (2004). The Right to Say Everything. The European Legacy 9 (1):7-17.
    Can one say everything? Does one have the right to say everything? This essay distinguishes these two questions, and seeks to clarify them with reference to two French writers for whom the questions are central: Maurice Blanchot and Jacques Derrida. Blanchot considers the questions with respect to the Marquis de Sade and Louis?René des Fore?ts. For Blanchot, the right to say everything is not supported by an appeal to the integrity of the self; rather, it is linked to a kenosis (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  3
    Richard Whatmore (1998). The Political Economy of Jean-Baptiste Say's Republicanism. History of Political Thought 19 (3):439-456.
    Orthodoxy maintains that Jean-Baptiste Say was a liberal political economist and the French disciple of Adam Smith. This article seeks to question such an interpretation through an examination of Say's early writings, and especially the first edition of his famous Traite d'economie politique (Paris, 1803). It is shown that Say was a passionate republican in the 1790s, but a republican of a particular kind. Through the influence of the radical Genevan exile Etienne Claviere, Say became convinced that only a republican (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Corey Brettschneider (2012). Chapter Three. When the State Speaks, What Should It Say?: Democratic Persuasion and the Freedom of Expression. In When the State Speaks, What Should It Say?: How Democracies Can Protect Expression and Promote Equality. Princeton University Press 71-108.
  34.  9
    Bert Hamminga (2005). The Pozna View: How to Mean What You Say. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 88 (1):129-140.
    The Pozna view is about the logical structure of theories, about what such theories claim and how rationally to judge and improve them. In the context of this volume it is relevant to explore what the Pozna view and the African ideas about knowledge have to say about one another.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  7
    Anfinn Stigen (1960). What Does Mr. Tennessen Mean, and What Should I Say? Inquiry 3 (1-4):180 – 184.
    Referring to Professor Tennessen's article “What Should We Say?”; (Inquiry, vol. 2 (1959), pp. 265-90), Mr. Stigen argues that Tennessen fails to distinguish between the speech situation of the speaker and that of the interpreter. He therefore, according to Stigen, confuses the problems relevant to each of them and frequently treats problems of “What should I say?”; with considerations relevant only to interpreters, whose proper question is “What does he mean?”;, and vice versa. Among other mistakes, according to Stigen, this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Noam Chomsky, "What We Say Goes": The Middle East in the New World Order.
    A standard response is that we live in "an era full of promise," "one of those rare transforming moments in history". The United States "has a new credibility," the President announced, and dictators and tyrants everywhere know " that what we say goes." George Bush is "at the height of his powers" and "has made very clear that he wants to breathe light into that hypothetical creature, the Middle East peace process". So things are looking up.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  2
    Sandra Laugier (2011). Introduction to the French Edition of Must We Mean What We Say? Critical Inquiry 37 (4):627-651.
    Must We Mean What We Say? is Stanley Cavell's first book, and, in a sense, it is his most important. It contains all the themes that Cavell continues to develop masterfully throughout his philosophy. There is a renewed usage of J. L. Austin's theory of speech acts, and, in the classic essay “The Availability of Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy,” he establishes the foundations of a radical reading of Ludwig Wittgenstein , the connections among skepticism, acknowledgement, and Shakespearean tragedy ; there is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  1
    Clement Dore (1974). Do Theodicists Mean What They Say? Philosophy 49 (190):357 - 374.
    Many theodicists have maintained that God is justified in permitting suffering on the ground that His doing so is a necessary condition of the realization of certain intrinsically valuable ends which the suffering serves and whose value outweighs the suffering which occasions them. Examples of ends which are frequently cited in this connection are freely chosen actions in accordance with stringent obligations to be charitable and steadfast. To say that the value of these ends outweighs the suffering which gives rise (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  1
    Julian Savulescu, Bennett Foddy & John Rogers (2006). What Should We Say? Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (1):7-12.
    ethics mostly focuses on what we do. One form of action is a speech act. What we say can have profound effects. We can and should choose our words and how we speak wisely. When someone close to us suffers an injury or serious illness, a duty of beneficence requires that we support that person through beneficial words or actions. Though our intentions are most often benign, by what we say we often make the unfortunate person feel worse. Beginning with (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Avner Baz (2000). On the Point of What We Say: Kant, Wittgenstein, and Cavell on When Words Are Called For. Dissertation, University of Illinois at Chicago
    The dissertation consists of three separate but related papers. The papers investigate various ways in which questions of value bear on questions of intelligibility, and vice versa. The guiding idea is the Wittgensteinian insight, explored by Stanley Cavell, that our intelligibility, to ourselves and to others, and in particular our saying anything with our words, is a matter of making a point. In the first paper I offer a reading guided by this insight, of Wittgenstein's remarks on 'seeing aspects'. In (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Parker English (2009). What We Say, Who We Are: Leopold Senghor, Zora Neale Hurston, and the Philosophy of Language. Lexington Books.
    In What We Say, Who We Are, Parker English explores the commonality between Leopold Senghor's concept of "negritude" and Zora Neale Hurston's view of "Negro expression." For English, these two concepts emphasize that a person's view of herself is above all dictated by the way in which she talks about herself. Focusing on "performism," English discusses the presentational/representational and externalistic/internalistic facets of this concept and how they relate to the ideas of Senghor and Hurston.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Evelyn L. Forget (1999). The Social Economics of Jean-Baptiste Say: Markets and Virtue. Routledge.
    This book uses archival and published sources to place Say in context, at the confluence of several major currents in social philosophy. The Say that emerges from this study is far from being the one dimensional popularizer of Smith and proponent of libertarian ideology that he is often depicted as. Rather he is an eighteenth-century republican trying to knit togther support for free markets and industrial development with a profound respect for the importance of the legislator, the administrator and the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. J. Savulescu (2006). What Should We Say? Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (1):7-12.
    ethics mostly focuses on what we do. One form of action is a speech act. What we say can have profound effects. We can and should choose our words and how we speak wisely. When someone close to us suffers an injury or serious illness, a duty of beneficence requires that we support that person through beneficial words or actions. Though our intentions are most often benign, by what we say we often make the unfortunate person feel worse. Beginning with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Laurent Milesi & Stefan Herbrechter (eds.) (2006). H. C. For Life, That is to Say.. Stanford University Press.
    _H. C. for Life, That Is to Say..._ is Derrida's literary critical recollection of his lifelong friendship with Hélène Cixous. The main figure that informs Derrida's reading here is that of "taking sides." While Hélène Cixous in her life and work takes the side of life, "for life," Derrida admits always feeling drawn to the side of death. Rather than being an obvious choice, taking the side of life is an act of faith, by wagering one's life on life. _H. (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  2
    Aidan Nichols (2001). Say It is Pentecost: A Guide Through Balthasar's Logic. Catholic University of America Press.
    Say It Is Pentecost completes Aidan Nichols's presentation of the great theological trilogy of Hans Urs von Balthasar.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Jan Plug (ed.) (1998). That is to Say: Heidegger's Poetics. Stanford University Press.
    This is the first authoritative, book-length study of what Heidegger called "thinking poetics." _That Is to Say_ conducts its analysis of Heideggerian poetics by expounding the sense of language from the perspective of fundamental ontology. This project is carried out in readings of the pertinent chapters of _Being and Time_, the lectures on Hölderlin, "The Origin of the Work of Art," and _On the Way to Language_. The book is guided by a question that no other writer on Heidegger has (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Bethany Spielman (2010). The Pitfalls of Misreading: What Does “Industry Funding of Medical Education” Actually Say? American Journal of Bioethics 10 (1):24-25.
    (2010). The Pitfalls of Misreading: What Does “Industry Funding of Medical Education” Actually Say? The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 24-25.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  12
    Shirley Darcus Sullivan (1995). Psychological and Ethical Ideas: What Early Greeks Say. E.J. Brill.
    This book describes what early Greek poets and philosophers say about certain ideas of the Archaic Age, namely "psychological activity," "soul," "excellence," ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Matthew Weiner (2005). Must We Know What We Say? Philosophical Review 114 (2):227-251.
    The knowledge account of assertion holds that it is improper to assert that p unless the speaker knows that p. This paper argues against the knowledge account of assertion; there is no general norm that the speaker must know what she asserts. I argue that there are cases in which it can be entirely proper to assert something that you do not know. In addition, it is possible to explain the cases that motivate the knowledge account by postulating a general (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   87 citations  
  50.  70
    Pat Auger & Timothy M. Devinney (2007). Do What Consumers Say Matter? The Misalignment of Preferences with Unconstrained Ethical Intentions. Journal of Business Ethics 76 (4):361 - 383.
    Nearly all studies of consumers’ willingness to engage in ethical or socially responsible purchasing behavior is based on unconstrained survey response methods. In the present article we ask the question of how well does asking consumers the extent to which they care about a specific social or ethical issue relate to how they would behave in a more constrained environment where there is no socially acceptable response. The results of a comparison between traditional survey questions of “intention to purchase” and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   34 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000