Year:

  1.  40
    The Need for Philosophy in Promoting Democracy: A Case for Philosophy in the Curriculum.Gilbert Burgh - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):38-58.
    The studies by Trickey and Topping, which provide empirical support that philosophy produces cognitive gains and social benefits, have been used to advocate the view that philosophy deserves a place in the curriculum. Arguably, the existing curriculum, built around well-established core subjects, already provides what philosophy is said to do, and, therefore, there is no case to be made for expanding it to include philosophy. However, if we take citizenship education seriously, then the development of active and informed citizens requires (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  2
    The Generic Argument for Teaching Philosophy.Philip Cam - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1).
    John Dewey wished to place development of the ability to think at the core of school education. The kind of thinking that Dewey had in mind was based on his conception of scientific inquiry. Matthew Lipman was likewise committed to an education centred on thinking, but he claimed that we should turn to philosophy rather than to science in order to secure this end. In his view, philosophy has a stronger claim to this mantle than does science, or any other (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  25
    The Ethics of Narrative Art: Philosophy in Schools, Compassion and Learning From Stories.Laura D'Olimpio & Andrew Peterson - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):92-110.
    Following neo-Aristotelians Alasdair MacIntyre and Martha Nussbaum, we claim that humans are story-telling animals who learn from the stories of diverse others. Moral agents use rational emotions, such as compassion which is our focus here, to imaginatively reconstruct others’ thoughts, feelings and goals. In turn, this imaginative reconstruction plays a crucial role in deliberating and discerning how to act. A body of literature has developed in support of the role narrative artworks (i.e. novels and films) can play in allowing us (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. On the Distinctive Educational Value of Philosophy.Michael Hand - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1).
  5. Philosophy and the Good Life.Angela Hobbs - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1).
    This paper considers the implications for education of a reworked ancient Greek ethics and politics of flourishing, where ‘flourishing’ comprises the objective actualisation of our intellectual, imaginative and affective potential. A brief outline of the main features of an ethics of flourishing and its potential attractions as an ethical framework is followed by a consideration of the ethical, aesthetic and political requirements of such a framework for the theory and practice of education, indicating the ways in which my approach differs (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  3
    Deep Thinking and High Ceilings: Using Philosophy to Challenge ‘More Able’ Pupils.Carrie Winstanley - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1).
    At different times in their school career and across different subject areas, some pupils may require additional and/or more complex tasks from their teachers, since they find the work set to be insufficiently challenging. Recommendations for coping with these pupils’ needs are varied, but among other responses, it is common, in the field of ‘gifted and talented’ education, to advocate the use of critical thinking programmes. These can be very effective in providing the missing challenge through helping develop pupils’ facilities (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  2
    Plato, Metacognition and Philosophy in Schools.Peter Worley - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1).
    In this article, I begin by saying something about what metacognition is and why it is desirable within education. I then outline how Plato anticipates this concept in his dialogue Meno. This is not just a historical point; by dividing the cognitive self into a three-in-one—a ‘learner’, a ‘teacher’ and an ‘evaluator’—Plato affords us a neat metaphorical framework for understanding metacognition that, I contend, is valuable today. In addition to aiding our understanding of this concept, Plato’s model of metacognition not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues