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  1. An Afrophilic P4C Intervention: The Case of Sebakwe Primary Schools in Zimbabwe.John Bhurekeni - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 8 (1):6-32.
    Decades of research and practical engagement with an educational approach known as Philosophy for Children has documented and exemplified how the approach provides an optimum environment for the advancement of children’s rationality in diversity, critical reflexive thinking, and problem-solving skills. While this is certainly important, there is still a need to expand insights into how curriculum reform and transformation in Zimbabwe emerge from Afrophilic P4C learning processes. Drawing on insights from my involvement in a formative intervention study in a Sebakwe (...)
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  2.  7
    What Does Philosophy Do? Understanding the Work That Philosophy Does: A Review of the Literature on the Teaching and Learning of Philosophy in Schools. [REVIEW]Lynne Bowyer, Claire Amos & Deborah Stevens - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 8 (1):71-103.
    This paper is based on a literature review of articles discussing the teaching and learning of philosophy in primary and secondary schools. The purpose of this review was to address two research questions: What 'is 'philosophy? What does philosophy do? This paper addresses the second question—What does philosophy do?—by gathering together research that focuses on and discusses the impact of philosophy in the classroom. Two distinct claims emerge from the literature. The first claim is that philosophy improves academic and cognitive (...)
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    Philosophy for Children and Logic-Based Therapy.Christos Georgakakis - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 8 (1):53-70.
    This article aims to shed light on the interconnectedness between two important projects in applied philosophy: (a) Philosophy for Children (P4C), a movement for the introduction of philosophy in schools, and (b) Logic-based Therapy and Consultation (LBTC), a widely developed form of philosophical counselling. More specifically, it attempts to show how Michael Hand’s (2018) argument in favour of P4C can fruitfully be enhanced by the endorsement of fundamental theoretical assumptions of Elliot Cohen’s (2005, 2019) LBTC. Hand argues that philosophy should (...)
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  4.  2
    Philosophical Inquiry: Combining the Tools of Philosophy with Inquiry-Based Teaching and Learning, by Philip Cam.Andrew Rogers - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 8 (1):163-169.
    In the world of Philosophy for Schools, Dr Phil Cam requires no introduction. As stated in a recent edition of 'Journal of Philosophy in' 'Schools' that was dedicated to celebrating his work, ‘Philip Cam is an international authority on philosophy in schools who has been a pioneer in introducing philosophy and ethics into schools in Australia’'. Very simply, when Cam talks about P4C, people listen. As a result, I was hugely excited to receive a copy of his latest book 'Philosophical (...)
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  5.  2
    Reconciling Socrates and Levinas for the Community of Inquiry: A Response to Sharp and Laverty.Emmanuel Skoutas - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 8 (1):33-52.
    In the publication 'In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp' the editors, Maughn Rollins Gregory and Megan Jane Laverty present a series of significant essays that honour Anne Margaret Sharp and her significant contribution to the Philosophy for Children program. One of the essays, 'Looking at others’ faces', is a revised version of Sharp’s earlier essay and further develops her original themes and interests in post-structuralist research and its implications for the P4C program. Sharp and Laverty argue for recognising (...)
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  6.  2
    Student and Teacher Outcomes From Participating in a Philosophy for Children Program: Volunteer Ethics Teachers’ Perspectives.Gianni Zappalà & Ciara Smyth - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 8 (1):104-128.
    Despite the growth of philosophy for/with children over the last five decades, its legitimacy remains contested. Key themes within the P4C literature are the potential learning outcomes for children as well as possible personal and professional development benefits for those that teach it. The literature on the former, while extensive, presents a mixed picture and highlights the challenges inherent in determining the impact of P4C on learning outcomes. The literature on the latter, while little explored, may provide valuable insights for (...)
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  7. Cultivating and Nurturing a Positive School Culture and Climate: Impacts of Philosophy for Children Hawai‘I at Waikiki Elementary School.Jianhui Zhang & Amber Strong Makaiau - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 8 (1):129-162.
    This study investigates the development of positive school culture and climate at a mid-sized public elementary school in urban Oahu, Hawai’i, over fifteen years. Researchers ask: what key people, initiatives, and programs positively impacted the school culture and climate at Waikiki Elementary School? Qualitative methods are applied to design and carry out a portrait study, which included interviewing 22 members of the school community. Analysis of the data reveals how one particular school initiative—philosophy for children Hawai’i —had a positive impact. (...)
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