Year:

  1.  5
    How Semantic Memory Structure and Intelligence Contribute to Creative Thought: A Network Science Approach.Benedek Mathias, N. Kenett Yoed, Umdasch Konstantin, Anaki David, Faust Miriam & C. Neubauer Aljoscha - 2017 - Thinking and Reasoning 23 (2):158-183.
    The associative theory of creativity states that creativity is associated with differences in the structure of semantic memory, whereas the executive theory of creativity emphasises the role of top-down control for creative thought. For a powerful test of these accounts, individual semantic memory structure was modelled with a novel method based on semantic relatedness judgements and different criteria for network filtering were compared. The executive account was supported by a correlation between creative ability and broad retrieval ability. The associative account (...)
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  2. Are You Sure About That? Eliciting Confidence Ratings May Influence Performance on Raven's Progressive Matrices.Kit S. Double & Damian P. Birney - 2017 - Thinking and Reasoning 23 (2):190-206.
    Confidence ratings have often been integrated into reasoning and intelligence tasks as a means for assessing meta-reasoning processes. Although it is often assumed that eliciting these judgements throughout reasoning tasks has no effect on the underlying performance outcomes, this is yet to be established empirically. The current study examines whether eliciting CR from participants during a fluid-reasoning task influences their performance and how this effect is moderated by their initial self-confidence in their own reasoning abilities. In a first experiment, we (...)
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  3. What Causes Failure to Apply the Pigeonhole Principle in Simple Reasoning Problems?Mercier Hugo, Politzer Guy & Sperber Dan - 2017 - Thinking and Reasoning 23 (2):184-189.
    The Pigeonhole Principle states that if n items are sorted into m categories and if n > m, then at least one category must contain more than one item. For instance, if 22 pigeons are put into 17 pigeonholes, at least one pigeonhole must contain more than one pigeon. This principle seems intuitive, yet when told about a city with 220,000 inhabitants none of whom has more than 170,000 hairs on their head, many people think that it is merely likely (...)
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  4.  1
    Set Size, Assertion Form, Thematic Content and Sampling in the Selection Task.Raymond S. Nickerson, Susan F. Butler & Daniel H. Barch - 2017 - Thinking and Reasoning 23 (2):134-157.
    Participants attempted to solve a modified version of Wason's selection task. Variables were: sizes of the sets referenced by a specified assertion, form of the assertion, thematic content of the assertion, and the need for sampling or not. In Experiment 1, participants were given enough information to determine the truth or falsity of the specified assertion with certainty; in Experiment 2, they had to rely on sampling and could not determine the assertion's truth or falsity with certainty. Performance was better (...)
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