Autism as a Natural Human Variation: Reflections on the Claims of the Neurodiversity Movement [Book Review]

Health Care Analysis 20 (1):20-30 (2012)

Abstract
Neurodiversity has remained a controversial concept over the last decade. In its broadest sense the concept of neurodiversity regards atypical neurological development as a normal human difference. The neurodiversity claim contains at least two different aspects. The first aspect is that autism, among other neurological conditions, is first and foremost a natural variation. The other aspect is about conferring rights and in particular value to the neurodiversity condition, demanding recognition and acceptance. Autism can be seen as a natural variation on par with for example homosexuality. The broad version of the neurodiversity claim, covering low-functioning as well as high-functioning autism, is problematic. Only a narrow conception of neurodiversity, referring exclusively to high-functioning autists, is reasonable. We will discuss the effects of DSM categorization and the medical model for high functioning autists. After a discussion of autism as a culture we will analyze various possible strategies for the neurodiversity movement to claim extra resources for autists as members of an underprivileged culture without being labelled disabled or as having a disorder. We will discuss their vulnerable status as a group and what obligation that confers on the majority of neurotypicals.
Keywords Autism  Disability  DSM-V  Equality  Neurodiversity  Vulnerability
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DOI 10.1007/s10728-011-0169-9
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References found in this work BETA

Vulnerability: Too Vague and Too Broad?Doris Schroeder & Eugenijus Gefenas - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (2):113.
Autism, Neurodiversity, and Equality Beyond the "Normal".Andrew Fenton & Tim Krahn - 2007 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 2 (2):2.
Vulnerability, Vulnerable Populations, and Policy.Mary C. Ruof - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (4):411-425.

View all 7 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Conceptualising Well-Being for Autistic Persons.Ingrid Robeyns - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (6):383-390.
The Ethics of Autism.Kristien Hens, Ingrid Robeyns & Katrien Schaubroeck - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (1):e12559.

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