Galileo vs Aristotle on free falling bodies

History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 7 (1):1-11 (2004)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

This essay attempts to demonstrate that it is doubtful if Galileo's famous thought experiment concerning falling bodies in his 'Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences' (Galileo 1954: 61-64) actually does succeed in proving that Aristotle was wrong in claiming that "bodies of different weight […] move […] with different speeds which stand to one another in the same ratio as their weights," (Galileo 1954: 61). (Part I); and further that it is likewise doubtful that that argument does or even can establish Galileo's own famous 'Law of Falling Bodies,' viz., that regardless of their weight all bodies fall with the same speed. (Part II).

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 92,907

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Galileo's first new science: The science of matter.Zvi Biener - 2004 - Perspectives on Science 12 (3):262-287.
Galileo and the indispensability of scientific thought experiment.Tamar Szabó Gendler - 1998 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (3):397-424.
Aspects of aristotelian statics in Galileo's dynamics.J. Groot - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 31 (4):645-664.
Patterns of argumentation in Galileo's Discorsi.Marta Fehér - 1998 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 12 (1):17-24.
Patterns of argumentation in Galileo's discorsi.Marta Feh - 1998 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 12 (1):17 – 24.

Analytics

Added to PP
2009-01-28

Downloads
304 (#69,193)

6 months
4 (#855,130)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

Markus Schrenk
Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf

References found in this work

Are Thought Experiments Just What You Thought?John D. Norton - 1996 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (3):333 - 366.
Galileo and the indispensability of scientific thought experiment.Tamar Szabó Gendler - 1998 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (3):397-424.
Thought Experiments.Yiftach J. H. Fehige & James R. Brown - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 25 (1):135-142.
Dictionary of Philosophy.Simon Blackburn - 2005 - Oxford ;: Oxford University Press UK.

Add more references