“Do your homework…and then hope for the best”: the challenges that medical tourism poses to Canadian family physicians' support of patients' informed decision-making [Book Review]

BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):37 (2013)

Authors
Jeremy Snyder
Simon Fraser University
Abstract
Medical tourism—the practice where patients travel internationally to privately access medical care—may limit patients’ regular physicians’ abilities to contribute to the informed decision-making process. We address this issue by examining ways in which Canadian family doctors’ typical involvement in patients’ informed decision-making is challenged when their patients engage in medical tourism
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DOI 10.1186/1472-6939-14-37
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Rethinking Informed Consent in Bioethics.Neil C. Manson - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.

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