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  1.  16
    Reconstructing the Real Unit of Selection.Adolf Heschl - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):624-625.
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  2.  28
    Behaviour and the Concept of “Heritability” Axioms of an Ethological Refutation.Adolf Heschl - 1992 - Acta Biotheoretica 40 (1):23-30.
    This paper discusses the widespread use of heritability calculations in recent behaviour research including behaviour genetics. In the sequel, a radical criticism concerning the basic axioms of the underlying, more general concept itself is presented. The starting point for testing the proclaimed universal validity of this concept stems from a fictitious yet realistic example taken from learning research. The theoretical result, based on the application of the conventional reasoning in this field, states that developmental processes — and learning is only (...)
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  3.  26
    Natural Selection and Metaphors of “Selection”.Adolf Heschl - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):539-540.
    Natural selection in the sense of Darwin always means physical propagation (positive case) or disappearance (negative case) of living organisms due to differential reproduction. If one concentrates on this simple materialist principle, one arrives at a much better method of discerning true selection processes from largely nonrandom processes of internal rearrangement (somatic mutations) and reorganisation (operant learning).
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  4.  16
    Adaptation as Genetic Internalization.Adolf Heschl - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):673-674.
    In the course of evolution organisms change both their morphology and their physiology in response to ever-changing environmental selection pressures. This process of adaptation leads to an “internalization,” in the sense that external regularities are in some way “imitated” by the living system. Countless examples illustrate the usefulness of this metaphor. However, if we concentrate too much on Shepard's “universal regularities in the world,” we run the risk of overlooking the many more fascinating evolutionary details which alone have made, and (...)
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  5. Who's Afraid of a Non-Metaphorical Evolutionary Epistemology?Adolf Heschl - 1997 - Philosophia Naturalis 34 (1):107-145.
     
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