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  1.  63
    Smith, William Hosmer: The Phenomenology of Moral Normativity: London: Routledge, 2012. . ISBN 9780415890687, 215 pp. US-$145 , US-$55 ; € 133 , € 50.Anne C. Ozar - 2016 - Husserl Studies 32 (1):67-73.
    In the field of contemporary metaethics, discontinuity theories that also want to defend the objectivity of moral claims tend to be broadly Kantian.While several such theories have made good use of what William Hosmer Smith labels a “narrow phenomenology” of ‘what it is like’ for agents to be confronted with what appear to be objective, categorical demands, he rightly observes that “they haven’t yet fully articulated the experiences that make this moral deliberation possible and to which it is beholden” (p. (...)
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  2.  24
    The Plausibility of Client Trust of Professionals.Anne C. Ozar - 2014 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 33 (1):83-98.
    Trust is a crucial component of the relationship between a professional and those whom the professional serves because those served often lack the past experience and specialized training necessary to adequately assess the reliability of the professional’s judgments on their behalf. This article is an attempt to enhance our understanding of the conditions under which client trust of a professional is plausible. Trust, I will explain, is an emotional attitude with a unique evaluative dimension that can lead the one who (...)
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  3.  76
    The Value of a Phenomenology of the Emotions for Cultivating One’s Own Character.Anne C. Ozar - 2010 - New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 10:303-317.
    This article demonstrates the unique value of a Husserlian phenomenological account of the affective (or “feeling”) dimension of emotional experience for realizing Aristotle’s vision of the cultivation of virtue. Through an analysis of envy, the author defends the claim that the affective dimension of self-assessment is central to the process of conceptualization by which we learn to apprehend our own emotional responses. Analytic conceptual analyses that dismiss the subjective, affective correlate of emotional experiences, therefore, fail to take seriously what is (...)
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