8 found
Order:
  1.  16
    What is ‘moral distress’? A narrative synthesis of the literature.Georgina Morley, Jonathan Ives, Caroline Bradbury-Jones & Fiona Irvine - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (3):646-662.
    Aims:The aim of this narrative synthesis was to explore the necessary and sufficient conditions required to define moral distress.Background:Moral distress is said to occur when one has made a moral judgement but is unable to act upon it. However, problems with this narrow conception have led to multiple redefinitions in the empirical and conceptual literature. As a consequence, much of the research exploring moral distress has lacked conceptual clarity, complicating attempts to study the phenomenon.Design:Systematic literature review and narrative synthesis (November (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  2.  4
    What is ‘moral distress’ in nursing? A feminist empirical bioethics study.Georgina Morley, Caroline Bradbury-Jones & Jonathan Ives - 2020 - Nursing Ethics 27 (5):1297-1314.
    BackgroundThe phenomenon of ‘moral distress’ has continued to be a popular topic for nursing research. However, much of the scholarship has lacked conceptual clarity, and there is debate about what it means to experience moral distress. Moral distress remains an obscure concept to many clinical nurses, especially those outside of North America, and there is a lack of empirical research regarding its impact on nurses in the United Kingdom and its relevance to clinical practice.Research aimTo explore the concept of moral (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  3.  13
    Reasons to Redefine Moral Distress: A Feminist Empirical Bioethics Analysis.Georgina Morley, Caroline Bradbury-Jones & Jonathan Ives - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):61-71.
    There has been increasing debate in recent years about the conceptualization of moral distress. Broadly speaking, two groups of scholars have emerged: those who agree with Jameton’s ‘narrow definition’ that focuses on constraint and those who argue that Jameton’s definition is insufficient and needs to be broadened. Using feminist empirical bioethics, we interviewed critical care nurses in the United Kingdom about their experiences and conceptualizations of moral distress. We provide our broader definition of moral distress and examples of data that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  4.  9
    Moral Distress and Austerity: An Avoidable Ethical Challenge in Healthcare.Georgina Morley, Jonathan Ives & Caroline Bradbury-Jones - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 27 (3):185-201.
    Austerity, by its very nature, imposes constraints by limiting the options for action available to us because certain courses of action are too costly or insufficiently cost effective. In the context of healthcare, the constraints imposed by austerity come in various forms; ranging from the availability of certain treatments being reduced or withdrawn completely, to reductions in staffing that mean healthcare professionals must ration the time they make available to each patient. As austerity has taken hold, across the United Kingdom (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  5.  8
    Abjectly Boundless: Boundaries, Bodies and Health Work.Caroline Bradbury-Jones - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (2):153-155.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  41
    A reply to ‘Phenomenology as research method or substantive metaphysics? An overview of phenomenology's uses in nursing’ by Vicki Earle: a phenomenological grapevine?Caroline Bradbury-Jones - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (3):224-227.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  31
    Domestic abuse as a transgressive practice: understanding nurses' responses through the lens of abjection.Caroline Bradbury-Jones & Julie Taylor - 2013 - Nursing Philosophy 14 (4):295-304.
    Domestic abuse is a worldwide public health issue with long‐term health and social consequences. Nurses play a key role in recognizing and responding to domestic abuse. Yet there is considerable evidence that their responses are often inappropriate and unhelpful, such as trivializing or ignoring the abuse. Empirical studies have identified several reasons why nurses' responses are sometimes wanting. These include organizational constraints, e.g. lack of time and privacy; and interpersonal factors such as fear of offending women and lack of confidence. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  26
    Polemics and Pregnancy: A Response to Arguments About Ethical Obstetrical Care.Caroline Bradbury-Jones & Elaine Lee - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (12):64-65.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 12, Page 64-65, December 2011.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark