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  1.  13
    James Hutton and His Public, 1785–1802.Dennis R. Dean - 1973 - Annals of Science 30 (1):89-105.
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  2.  10
    Robert Mallet and the Founding of Seismology.Dennis R. Dean - 1991 - Annals of Science 48 (1):39-67.
    Though the name of Robert Mallet was once inevitably associated with the scientific study of earthquakes, it is less well known today. As part of an overdue reappraisal, this essay examines Mallet's major seismological projects and publications, emphasizing his theoretical contributions. Mallet's own claim to be a founder of modern seismology is upheld. Beyond that, however, he is also seen to be an important precursor of plate tectonics.
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  3.  13
    Benjamin Franklin and Earthquakes.Dennis R. Dean - 1989 - Annals of Science 46 (5):481-495.
    Benjamin Franklin, the colonial American, maintained a now little-known interest in geological questions for more than sixty years. He began as a follower of English theorists, but soon assimilated some of their ideas with original speculations and discoveries, particularly regarding earthquakes. Though Franklin became famous for his experiments with electricity, he never attempted to explain earthquakes as if they were electrical phenomena; others, however, did. Through his access to American materials, Franklin contributed significantly to the work of several English and (...)
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  4.  30
    Theodore Henry Hittell's The California Academy of Sciences: A Narrative History, 1853-1906. Alan E. Leviton, Michele L. Aldrich. [REVIEW]Dennis R. Dean - 1998 - Isis 89 (3):556-557.
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  5.  29
    The San Francisco Earthquake of 1906.Dennis R. Dean - 1993 - Annals of Science 50 (6):501-521.
    Though among the most famous earthquakes in modern times, San Francisco has almost always been presented as nothing more than a great human disaster. While certainly that, we should regard it also as having had unusual significance in the development of seismology. Because the full extent of the San Andreas fault was thereafter recognized, and the association between faulting and earthquakes confirmed, we may consider the San Francisco earthquake of 1906 to be the first in which modern understanding of seismic (...)
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  6.  13
    In Pursuit of a Scientific Culture: Science, Art, and Society in the Victorian Age. Peter Allan Dale. [REVIEW]Dennis R. Dean - 1991 - Isis 82 (2):391-393.
  7.  13
    Tom Rea. Bone Wars: The Excavation and Celebrity of Andrew Carnegie’s Dinosaur. 276 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2001. $25. [REVIEW]Dennis R. Dean - 2002 - Isis 93 (4):722-723.
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  8.  11
    Santorini and Its Eruptions. Ferdinand A. Fouque, Alexander R. McBirney.Dennis R. Dean - 2000 - Isis 91 (3):609-610.
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  9.  12
    The Age of the Earth Controversy: Beginnings to Hutton.Dennis R. Dean - 1981 - Annals of Science 38 (4):435-456.
    Speculation concerning the age of the earth begins with civilisation itself. The creation myths of ancient Egypt and other early cultures were soon expanded into elaborate cosmologies by Indian, Persian and Greek philosophers. Jewish and, more insistently, Christian scholars long believed that the Bible provided an exact chronology beginning with the Creation . Such truncated apocalyptic chronologies were opposed first by Aristotelian advocates of an eternal earth and then by deistic freethinkers who regarded the earth's age as indefinite but immense. (...)
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  10.  9
    Hugh Torrens. The Practice of British Geology, 1750–1850. Xii + 350 Pp., Maps, Figs., Index. Burlington, Vt.: Ashgate Publishers, 2002. $105.95. [REVIEW]Dennis R. Dean - 2003 - Isis 94 (1):161-162.
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  11.  10
    John Muir and the Origin of Yosemite Valley.Dennis R. Dean - 1991 - Annals of Science 48 (5):453-485.
    Though virtually unknown before 1851, the exceptionally scenic Yosemite Valley of California soon attracted continuing attention as a geological anomaly. J. D. Whitney, state geologist and Harvard professor, advocated a tectonic theory of its origin. Despite its seemingly official status, Whitney's theory even failed to convince some of his own subordinates. An unexpectedly effective dissenter not associated with Whitney was John Muir, then a tatterdemalion vagrant. Though the two men never met, conflict between their inflexible and mutually exclusive geological theories (...)
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  12.  8
    The Culture of English Geology, 1815-1851: A Science Revealed Through Its Collecting. Simon J. Knell.Dennis R. Dean - 2001 - Isis 92 (1):191-191.
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  13.  31
    James Hutton on Religion and Geology: The Unpublished Preface to His Theory of the Earth.Dennis R. Dean - 1975 - Annals of Science 32 (3):187-193.
    James Hutton knew before its publication that his geological theory would be subjected to religious criticism, and in an eventually rejected preface he endeavoured to mitigate that criticism. His theory is an almost perfect expression of the deistic tenets in which he believed. But he sensed that his attempted defence was inadequate, and so he submitted his preface to William Robertson for advice. Robertson rewrote Hutton's preface for him but also suggested tactfully that it not be published, advice which Hutton (...)
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  14.  6
    Christopher McGowan. The Dragon Seekers: How an Extraordinary Circle of Fossilists Discovered the Dinosaurs and Paved the Way for Darwin. Xvi + 254 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index.Cambridge, Mass.: Perseus Publishing, 2001. $26, Can $39.50. [REVIEW]Dennis R. Dean - 2002 - Isis 93 (1):88-89.
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  15.  5
    Duchamp in Context: Science and Technology in the "Large Glass" and Related Works. Linda Dalrymple Henderson.Dennis R. Dean - 2000 - Isis 91 (1):180-182.
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  16.  15
    The Word ‘Geology’.Dennis R. Dean - 1979 - Annals of Science 36 (1):35-43.
    Although the history of the word ‘ geology ’ has often been referred to by those interested in the development of the science, that history has never been fully traced. An endeavor is made to do so here, taking the story at least as far as 1813, by which time the basic word had unquestionably been established in its modern form and meaning. Various claims as to who first gave the science its present name are also briefly examined.
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  17.  3
    In Reply.Dennis R. Dean - 2002 - Isis 93 (1):81-82.
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  18.  3
    Sandra Herbert. Charles Darwin, Geologist. Xx + 485 Pp., Illus., Figs., Bibl., Index. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2005. $35.95. [REVIEW]Dennis R. Dean - 2006 - Isis 97 (4):769-770.
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  19.  3
    New Light on William Maclure.Dennis R. Dean - 1989 - Annals of Science 46 (6):549-574.
    The recent publication of twenty European travel journals originally written in the nineteenth century by William Maclure, the sometime ‘father of American geology’, has entailed major revisions in our understanding of their author. In the present essay I review geological portions of all twenty journals, integrating their contents with Maclure's already known but never before comprehensively discussed publications, which now appear in a new perspective. I then suggest a more adequate evaluation of Maclure's significance within a considerably revised schematization of (...)
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  20.  1
    John Playfair and His Books.Dennis R. Dean - 1983 - Annals of Science 40 (2):179-187.
    John Playfair left a library of over 1,400 volumes at his death. Analysing these augments our understanding of his mind, particularly with regard to geology. Two questions of special import are why this teacher of mathematics was interested in geology at all, and why, having written his Illustrations of the Huttonian theory of the Earth he never completed the proposed second edition of this famous and influential work.
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