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  1.  11
    Ritual Intuitions: Cognitive Contributions to Judgments of Ritual Efficacy.Justin Barrett & E. Thomas Lawson - 2001 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 1 (2):183-201.
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  2. A New Look at the Science-and-Religion Dialogue.E. Thomas Lawson - 2005 - Zygon 40 (3):555-564.
    Cognitive science is beginning to make a contribution to the science-and-religion dialogue by its claims about the nature of both scientific and religious knowledge and the practices such knowledge informs. Of particular importance is the distinction between folk knowledge and abstract theoretical knowledge leading to a distinction between folk science and folk religion on the one hand and the reflective, theoretical, abstract form of thought that characterizes both advanced scientific thought and sophisticated theological reasoning on the other. Both folk science (...)
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  3. Who Owns €˜Culture’? By.Robert N. McCauley & E. Thomas Lawson - unknown
               No one owns 'culture'[i]: anyone with a viable theoretical proposal can contend for the right to determine that concept's fate. Not everyone agrees with this view. Throughout its century-long struggle for academic respectability, anthropology has regularly insisted on its unique role as the proprietor of 'culture.' Its variety of approaches and feuding factions notwithstanding, it is this proprietary claim that unifies anthropology to an extent sometimes unrecognized even by its (...)
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  4. Who Owns 'Culture'?Robert N. McCauley & E. Thomas Lawson - unknown
    No one owns 'culture' [i]: anyone with a viable theoretical proposal can contend for the right to determine that concept's fate. Not everyone agrees with this view. Throughout its century long struggle for academic respectability, anthropology has regularly insisted on its unique role as the proprietor of 'culture.' Its variety of approaches and feuding factions notwithstanding, it is this proprietary claim that unifies anthropology to an extent sometimes unrecognized even by its own (post modernist) practitioners. The history of anthropology has (...)
     
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  5. Interactionism and the Non Obviousness of Scientific Theories.Robert N. McCauley & E. Thomas Lawson - unknown
    Levine's discussion of Rethinking Religion (1990) and "Crisis of Conscience, Riddle of Identity" (1993) includes some rash charges, some useful comments, and some profound misunderstandings. The latter, especially, reveal areas where we need to clarify and further defend our claims. In the second section we shall discuss the epistemological and methodological issues that Levine raises. Then we shall turn in the third section to theoretical and substantive matters. In fact, Levine remains almost completely silent on substantive matters (except to say (...)
     
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  6. Imagination Bound and Unbound.E. Thomas Lawson - 2008 - In Jonathan Z. Smith, Willi Braun & Russell T. McCutcheon (eds.), Introducing Religion: Essays in Honor of Jonathan Z. Smith. Equinox. pp. 231.
  7.  6
    Letter From the Editors.E. Thomas Lawson & Justin E. Lane - 2016 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 16 (3-4):175-175.
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  8. The Cognitive Representation of Religious Ritual Form: A Theory of Participants' Competence with Their Religious Ritual Systems.E. Thomas Lawson & Robert N. McCauley - unknown
    Theorizing about religious ritual systems from a cognitive viewpoint involves (1) modeling cognitive processes and their products and (2) demonstrating their influence on religious behavior. Particularly important for such an approach to the study of religious ritual is the modeling of participants' representations of ritual form. In pursuit of that goal, we presented in Rethinking Religion a theory of religious ritual form that involved two commitments. The theory’s first commitment is that the cognitive apparatus for the representation of action in (...)
     
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