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  1.  35
    Grotius and Pufendorf on the Right of Necessity.John Salter - 2005 - History of Political Thought 26 (2):285-302.
  2.  47
    Hugo Grotius.John Salter - 2001 - Political Theory 29 (4):537-555.
  3.  65
    Hume and Mutual Advantage.John Salter - 2012 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (3):302-321.
    Hume’s theory of justice is commonly regarded by contemporary theorists of justice as a theory of justice as mutual advantage. It is thus widely thought to manifest all the unattractive features of such theories: in particular, it is thought to endorse the exclusion of people with serious mental or physical disabilities from the scope and protection of justice and to justify the European expropriation of the lands of defenceless aboriginal people. I argue that this reading of Hume is mistaken. Mutual (...)
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  4.  42
    Adam Smith: Justice and Due Shares.John Salter - 2000 - Economics and Philosophy 16 (1):139-146.
    In a contribution to this journal Amos Witzum has challenged a common interpretation of Adam Smith's theory of justice, according to which Smith ‘employed a concept of justice – in the tradition of natural laws theories – whereby rights are related to guarding what is one's own rather than to what is one's due’ (Witzum, 1997, p. 242). Witzum claims that not only does Smith's conception of justice include one's due, and hence, distributional considerations, but the right to one's own (...)
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  5.  21
    Sympathy with the Poor: Theories of Punishment in Hugo Grotius and Adam Smith.John Salter - 1999 - History of Political Thought 20 (2):205-224.
    Grotius argued that it was sometimes permissible to excuse from punishment those who commit crimes out of extreme poverty. The grounds for doing so were separate from the grounds of the right of necessity. Leniency was possible because the seriousness of the crime and the degree of guilt of the offender were separate considerations. Punishment should be related to guilt, which, according to Grotius, was partly a matter of the circumstances and motives of the offender. He thought there were some (...)
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