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Leigh Price
Rhodes University
  1. Hume’s Two Causalities and Social Policy: Moon Rocks, Transfactuality, and the UK’s Policy on School Absenteeism.Leigh Price - 2014 - Journal of Critical Realism 13 (4):385-398.
    Hume maintained that, philosophically speaking, there is no difference between exiting a room out of the first-floor window and using the door. Nevertheless, Hume’s reason and common sense prevailed over his scepticism and he advocated that we should always use the door. However, we are currently living in a world that is more seriously committed to the Humean philosophy of empiricism than he was himself and thus the potential to act inappropriately is an ever-present potential. In this paper, I explore (...)
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  2.  14
    Introduction to the Special Issue: Applied Critical Realism in the Social Sciences.Leigh Price & Lee Martin - 2018 - Journal of Critical Realism 17 (2):89-96.
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  3.  3
    Introduction to the Special Issue: Normativity.Leigh Price - 2019 - Journal of Critical Realism 18 (3):221-238.
    Volume 18, Issue 3, June 2019, Page 221-238.
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  4.  25
    Wellbeing Research and Policy in the U.K.: Questionable Science Likely to Entrench Inequality.Leigh Price - 2017 - Journal of Critical Realism 16 (5):451-467.
    There are grave issues with how the U.K. government approaches the issue of wellbeing. Specifically, policy interventions that might improve the material conditions of citizens are being down-played, and at times out-rightly dismissed. Instead, an individualist, instrumental message is being promoted, namely, that the best way to improve wellbeing is by improving individual happiness and mental health. I argue that this instrumental message – which in practice blames the victims for their lack of happiness and removes state responsibility – can (...)
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  5.  17
    Critical Realist Versus Mainstream Interdisciplinarity.Leigh Price - 2014 - Journal of Critical Realism 13 (1):52-76.
    In this paper I argue for the superiority of a critical realist understanding of interdisciplinarity over a mainstream understanding of it. I begin by exploring the reasons for the failure of mainstream researchers to achieve interdisciplinarity. My main argument is that mainstream interdisciplinary researchers tend to hypostatize facts, fetishize constant conjunctions of events and apply to open systems an epistemology designed for closed systems. I also explain how mainstream interdisciplinarity supports oppression and gross inequality. I argue that mainstream interdisciplinarity is (...)
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  6.  6
    A Return to Common-Sense: Why Ecology Needs Transcendental Realism.Leigh Price - 2019 - Journal of Critical Realism 18 (1):31-44.
    ABSTRACTEmpirical realist ecologists, such as C. S. Holling, face significant methodological contradictions; for instance, they must cope with the problem that ecological models and theories of climate change, resilience and succession cannot make predictions in open systems. Generally, they respond to this problem by supplementing their empirical realism with transcendental idealism: they therefore say that their models are simply metaphorical or heuristic, that is, 'not true' in that they are not empirical. Thus, they explicitly deny an ontology for what their (...)
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    The Possibility of Deep Naturalism: A Philosophy for Ecology.Leigh Price - 2019 - Journal of Critical Realism 18 (4):352-367.
    ABSTRACTThis article presents a philosophy of science for ecology – deep naturalism – based on Roy Bhaskar’s transcendental realism. It includes a model of the emergence of ecosystems, analogous to...
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    A Peaceful Revenge: Achieving Structural and Agential Transformation in a South African Context Using Cognitive Justice and Emancipatory Social Learning.Jane Burt, Anna James & Leigh Price - 2018 - Journal of Critical Realism 17 (5):492-513.
    ABSTRACTThis is an account of the emancipatory struggle that faces agents who seek to change the oppressive social structures associated with neo-liberalism. We begin by ‘digging amongst the bones’ of the calls for resistance that have been declared dead or assimilated/co-opted by neoliberal theorists. This leads us to unearth, then utilize, Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Steve Biko’s Black Consciousness and Shiv Visvanathan's ideas; which are examples of Roy Bhaskar’s transformative dialectic. We argue, using examples, that cognitive justice – (...)
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    The Contemporary British Novel. By Philip Tew.(2004).Leigh Price - 2006 - Journal of Critical Realism 5 (2):397-426.
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  10.  10
    Review of The Contemporary British Novel by Philip Tew. [REVIEW]Leigh Price - 2006 - Journal of Critical Realism 5 (2):409-414.
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  11.  3
    Editors' Note.Leigh Price, Lee Martin & Dustin McWherter - 2017 - Journal of Critical Realism 16 (1):1-1.
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  12. Critical Realism, Environmental Learning and Social-Ecological Change.Leigh Price & Heila Lotz-Sistka (eds.) - 2015 - Routledge.
    Southern Africa, where most of these book chapters originate, has been identified as one of regions of the world most at risk of the consequences of environmental degradation and climate change. At the same time, it is still seeking ways to overcome the century long ravages of colonial and apartheid impositions of structural and epistemic violence. Research deliberations and applied research case studies in environmental education and activism from this region provide an emerging contextualized engagement that is related to a (...)
     
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