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  1.  49
    Social Entrepreneurship: The Role of Institutions.Mukesh Sud, Craig V. VanSandt & Amanda M. Baugous - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):201 - 216.
    A relatively small segment of business, known as social entrepreneurship (SE), is increasingly being acknowledged as an effective source of solutions for a variety of social problems. Because society tends to view "new" solutions as "the" solution, we are concerned that SE will soon be expected to provide answers to our most pressing social ills. In this paper we call into question the ability of SE, by itself, to provide solutions on a scope necessary to address large-scale social issues. SE (...)
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  2.  38
    Enabling the Original Intent: Catalysts for Social Entrepreneurship.Craig V. VanSandt, Mukesh Sud & Christopher Marmé - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S3):419 - 428.
    As capitalist economies have shifted their primary focus from providing goods and services for all, to concentrating wealth at the top echelons of societies, social entrepreneurs have been one source of re-capturing the original intent of capitalism. Social entrepreneurs have combined the efficiency and effectiveness of business organizations with the social concerns of many non-profit and governmental agencies. As a result, social entrepreneurship is viewed as having significant potential for alleviating many of the social ills we now face. To accomplish (...)
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  3.  13
    Poverty Alleviation Through Partnerships: A Road Less Travelled for Business, Governments, and Entrepreneurs. [REVIEW]Craig V. VanSandt & Mukesh Sud - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):321-332.
    While investigating the role of business and accepting that profitable partnerships are the primary solution for poverty alleviation, we voice certain concerns that we hope will extend the authors’ discourse in Alleviating Poverty through Profitable Partnerships . We present a model that we believe can serve as an effective framework for addressing these issues. We then establish the imperative of inclusive growth. Here, we engage with the necessity of formulating strategies that focus on the pace and, importantly, the pattern of (...)
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  4.  3
    Making Sense of Changing Ethical Expectations: The Role of Moral Imagination.Timothy J. Hargrave, Mukesh Sud, Craig V. VanSandt & Patricia M. Werhane - 2020 - Business and Society Review 125 (2):183-201.
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  5.  5
    Identity Rights: A Structural Void in Inclusive Growth.Mukesh Sud & Craig V. VanSandt - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (3):589-601.
    This paper investigates a structural void that, especially in the context of poor or developing nations, prevents economic growth from being more inclusive and benefiting wider sections of society. The authors initially examine the imperative for inclusive growth, one encompassing a focus on poverty and development. Utilizing social choice theory, and a capability deprivation perspective, we observe that the poor experience deprivations due to a deficiency in their personal autonomy. This in turn is deeply interwoven with the concept of identity. (...)
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  6.  34
    Of Fair Markets and Distributive Justice.Mukesh Sud & Craig V. VanSandt - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):131-142.
    The authors argue that a free market paradigm facilitates wealth creation but does little to distribute that wealth in a just manner. In order to achieve the social goal of distributive justice, the concept of a fair market is introduced and explored. The authors then examine three drivers that can help improve the lives of all people, especially the poor: civil society, its institutions, and business. After exploring the roles these drivers might play in developing fair markets, we describe three (...)
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  7.  5
    Strategic Global Strategy: The Intersection of General Principles, Corporate Responsibility and Economic Value-Added.Laura P. Hartman, Patricia H. Werhane, Cynthia E. Clark, Craig V. Vansandt & Mukesh Sud - 2017 - Business and Society Review 122 (1):71-91.
    An ongoing argument often made by business ethicists is that a singular preoccupation on profitability, will lead, in the long run, to disvalue for all the stakeholders and the communities it affects, and often, economic challenges for the company. On the other hand, we argue, a preoccupation with ethics and CSR as the primary aims of a for-profit company, it is, on its own, like a preoccupation with profitability, unsustainable. Indeed, without economic viability, a company will fail. Both of these (...)
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