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  1.  17
    Periodicity in the Formulae of Carbonyls and the Electronic Basis of the Periodic Table.Peter G. Nelson - 2013 - Foundations of Chemistry 15 (2):199-208.
    The basis of the Periodic Table is discussed. Electronic configuration recurs in only 21 out of the 32 groups. A better basis is derived by considering the highest classical valency (v) exhibited by an element and a new measure, the highest valency in carbonyl compounds (v*). This leads to a table based on the number of outer electrons possessed by an atom (N) and the number of electrons required for it to achieve an inert (noble) gas configuration (N*). Periodicity of (...)
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  2.  12
    Valencies of the Lanthanides.David A. Johnson & Peter G. Nelson - 2018 - Foundations of Chemistry 20 (1):15-27.
    The valencies of the lanthanides vary more than was once thought. In addition to valencies associated with a half-full shell, there are valencies associated with a quarter- and three-quarter-full shell. This can be explained on the basis of Slater’s theory of many-electron atoms. The same theory explains the variation in complexing constants in the trivalent state. Valency in metallic and organometallic compounds is also discussed.
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  3.  8
    Statistical Mechanical Interpretation of Temperature.Peter G. Nelson - forthcoming - Foundations of Chemistry:1-7.
    A statistical mechanical treatment is given of thermal contact between two systems. Reciprocal temperature emerges from this as the relative change in the number of microscopic states a macroscopic system at equilibrium ranges over, at constant volume and chemical composition, with change in internal energy. The significance of this is discussed in detail with reference to a monatomic gas and an Einstein solid.
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  4.  11
    What is Chemistry That I May Teach It?Peter G. Nelson - 2019 - Foundations of Chemistry 21 (2):179-191.
    This article presents a personal answer to the question “What is chemistry?”, set out in terms of six propositions. These cover “pure” and “applied” chemistry, different levels of description, and the broader context of chemistry.
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  5.  10
    Correction To: Valencies of the Lanthanides.David A. Johnson & Peter G. Nelson - 2019 - Foundations of Chemistry 21 (1):47-48.
    The authors regret that there are errors in equation and subsequent discussion. The correct version is as follows.
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  6.  24
    Introducing the Theory of Relativity.Peter G. Nelson - 2016 - Foundations of Chemistry 18 (1):15-19.
    A simple way of introducing the theory of relativity to chemistry students is presented. This is based on experimental observations of the variation in the mass of an electron with speed. Analysis of these generates the equations chemists use, and provides a basis for critical discussion of the theory.
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  7.  9
    Erratum To: Valencies of the Lanthanides.David A. Johnson & Peter G. Nelson - 2018 - Foundations of Chemistry 20 (1):29-30.
    The authors regret that there are errors in equation and subsequent discussion.
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  8.  25
    What is the Mole?Peter G. Nelson - 2013 - Foundations of Chemistry 15 (1):3-11.
    The mole is a difficult concept. Surveys have shown that even many teachers do not have a proper understanding of it. To help to meet this problem, the SI/IUPAC formulation of the mole is carefully presented and explained. New SI proposals are also briefly discussed.
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  9.  12
    A Modern Version of Lewis’s Theory of Valency.Peter G. Nelson - 2015 - Foundations of Chemistry 17 (2):153-162.
    A modern version of Lewis’s theory of valency is presented. This takes account of the results of quantum–mechanical calculations on molecules. Topics covered are polar covalent bonds, hypervalency, coordinate bonds, nonintegral bonds, oxo-anions, variable valency among transition elements, and nonclassical compounds. A distinction is drawn between the valence shell of an atom and the Lewis shell. The concept of a fractional bond pair is presented.
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  10.  6
    Erratum To: A Modern Version of Lewis’s Theory of Valency.Peter G. Nelson - 2016 - Foundations of Chemistry 18 (1):85-85.