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  1.  33
    Homeric ΔΙΙΠΕΤΕΟΣ ΠΟΤΑΜΟΙΟ and the Celestial Nile.R. Drew Griffith - 1997 - American Journal of Philology 118 (3).
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  2.  8
    Pelops and Sicily: The Myth of Pindar Ol. 1.R. Drew Griffith - 1989 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 109:171-173.
  3.  5
    Disrobing in the Oresteia.R. Drew Griffith - 1988 - Classical Quarterly 38 (02):552-.
    In Eum. 1028–9 the Furies mark their transformation into Eumenides by donning red robes over their black costumes in imitation of the robes worn in the Panathenaea by metics . Greek epic was sensitive to the symbolic value of clothing and Aeschylus had experimented in the Persians with the greater scope that drama offered for clothing-symbolism. Scholars have detected a wealth of associations in the Furies' robing-scene: this culmination of the trilogy echoes the red carpet upon which Agamemnon walks to (...)
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  4.  20
    Temple as Ship in Odyssey 6.10.R. Drew Griffith - 2002 - American Journal of Philology 123 (4):541-547.
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  5.  15
    Homeric and the Celestial Nile.R. Drew Griffith - 1997 - American Journal of Philology 118 (3):353-362.
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  6.  11
    Diuum Incedo Regina: A Sophoclean Idiom in Vergil, Aeneid 1.46.R. Drew Griffith - 2016 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 160 (1):172-176.
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  7.  13
    Oedipus's Bloodthirsty Sons: Love and Strife in Pindar's Second "Olympian Ode".R. Drew Griffith - 1991 - Classical Antiquity 10 (1):46-58.
  8.  15
    The Origin of Memnon.R. Drew Griffith - 1998 - Classical Antiquity 17 (2):212-234.
    This article endorses with substantial modifications M. Bernal's claim that the Greeks based Memnon on Ammenemes II of Egypt. An Egyptian origin for Memnon appears likely from Zeus' weighing of his fate against Achilles' in the Aethiopis, which is similar to an early spell of the Book of the Dead; from his Amazonian ally, who resembles the Nile-god, clad in a girdle with a single breast; and from his apotheosis, which is unlike Homer's usual view that the soul is witless (...)
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  9.  11
    Pws Liponaus Genwmai...;(Aeschylus, Agamemnon 212).R. Drew Griffith - 1991 - American Journal of Philology 112 (2).
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  10.  8
    The Aristophanic Slapstick.R. Drew Griffith - 2015 - Classical Quarterly 65 (2):530-533.
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  11.  8
    An Offer You Can't Retract: Xerxes' Nod and Masistes' Wife (Herodotus 9.111.1).R. Drew Griffith - 2011 - Classical Quarterly 61 (1):310-312.
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  12.  14
    Gods' Blue Hair in Homer and in Eighteenth-Dynasty Egypt.R. Drew Griffith - 2005 - Classical Quarterly 55 (02):329-334.
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  13.  2
    Salmoneus' Thunder-Machine Again.R. Drew Griffith - 2008 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 152 (1/2008).
  14. Pelops and Sicily: The Myth of Pindar Ol. I.R. Drew Griffith - 1989 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 109:171-173.