11 found
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  1.  40
    To Tell the Truth, the Whole Truth, May Do Patients Harm: The Problem of the Nocebo Effect for Informed Consent.Rebecca Erwin Wells & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):22-29.
    The principle of informed consent obligates physicians to explain possible side effects when prescribing medications. This disclosure may itself induce adverse effects through expectancy mechanisms known as nocebo effects, contradicting the principle of nonmaleficence. Rigorous research suggests that providing patients with a detailed enumeration of every possible adverse event?especially subjective self-appraised symptoms?can actually increase side effects. Describing one version of what might happen may actually create outcomes that are different from what would have happened without this information. This essay argues (...)
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  2.  7
    Are Open‐Label Placebos Ethical? Informed Consent and Ethical Equivocations.Charlotte Blease, Luana Colloca & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (6):407-414.
    The doctor-patient relationship is built on an implicit covenant of trust, yet it was not until the post-World War Two era that respect for patient autonomy emerged as an article of mainstream medical ethics. Unlike their medical forebears, physicians today are expected to furnish patients with adequate information about diagnoses, prognoses and treatments. Against these dicta there has been ongoing debate over whether placebos pose a threat to patient autonomy. A key premise underlying medical ethics discussion is the notion that (...)
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  3.  7
    Open-Label Placebo: Reflections on a Research Agenda.Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 61 (3):311-334.
    Until recently, the medical community assumed that placebos required either concealment in randomized controlled trials or deception in clinical practice to elicit placebo effects. Henry Beecher emphasized this orthodoxy, when he stated that placebo pills only work "as long as it is not detected as a placebo by the subject or the observer" and therefore, patients "believe it [is a drug] and consequently the expected results occurs". The time was ripe for such ideas: Norman Vincent Peale's The Power of Positive (...)
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  4.  44
    The Placebo Effect: Illness and Interpersonal Healing.Franklin G. Miller, Luana Colloca & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2009 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (4):518-539.
  5.  99
    The Web That Has No Weaver: Understanding Chinese Medicine.Ted J. Kaptchuk - 1986 - Philosophy East and West 36 (1):67-68.
  6.  15
    Patient Expectations in Placebo‐Controlled Randomized Clinical Trials.David A. Stone, Catherine E. Kerr, Eric Jacobson, Lisa A. Conboy ScD & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2005 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 11 (1):77-84.
  7.  34
    Patient Expectations in Placebo‐Controlled Randomized Clinical Trials.David A. Stone, Catherine E. Kerr, Eric Jacobson, A. Lisa & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2005 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 11 (1):77-84.
  8.  17
    The Impact of Psychological Factors on Placebo Responses in a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Sham Device to Dummy Pill.Suzanne M. Bertisch, Anna R. T. Legedza, Russell S. Phillips, Roger B. Davis, William B. Stason, Rose H. Goldman & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (1):14-19.
  9.  25
    Placebo Acupuncture as a Form of Ritual Touch Healing: A Neurophenomenological Model.Catherine E. Kerr, Jessica R. Shaw, Lisa A. Conboy, John M. Kelley, Eric Jacobson & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):784-791.
    Evidence that placebo acupuncture is an effective treatment for chronic pain presents a puzzle: how do placebo needles appearing to patients to penetrate the body, but instead sitting on the skin’s surface in the manner of a tactile stimulus, evoke a healing response? Previous accounts of ritual touch healing in which patients often described enhanced touch sensations suggest an embodied healing mechanism. In this qualitative study, we asked a subset of patients in a singleblind randomized trial in irritable bowel syndrome (...)
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  10.  15
    Mirror, Mirror on the Wall: Placebo Effects That Exist Only in the Eye of the Beholder.John M. Kelley, Patrick R. Boulos, Peter A. D. Rubin & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (2):292-298.
  11. Hope in Medicine: Applying Multidisciplinary Insights.Tobias Kube, Charlotte Blease, Sarah K. Ballou & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2019 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 62 (4):591-616.
    Providing a concise definition of hope is challenging. Psychologists alone have proposed 26 theories of hope and 54 definitions thereof. The difficulty of finding a universal definition of hope was summed up by the philosopher Joseph Godfrey who admitted, "I'd rather have hope than be able to define it". Part of the problem is that the concept is the object of scrutiny across many different scholarly disciplines, each of which have their own, sometimes divergent, methodologies and interests in the concept. (...)
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