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  1. Monetary Intelligence and Behavioral Economics: The Enron Effect—Love of Money, Corporate Ethical Values, Corruption Perceptions Index, and Dishonesty Across 31 Geopolitical Entities.Thomas Li-Ping Tang, Toto Sutarso, Mahfooz A. Ansari, Vivien K. G. Lim, Thompson S. H. Teo, Fernando Arias-Galicia, Ilya E. Garber, Randy Ki-Kwan Chiu, Brigitte Charles-Pauvers, Roberto Luna-Arocas, Peter Vlerick, Adebowale Akande, Michael W. Allen, Abdulgawi Salim Al-Zubaidi, Mark G. Borg, Bor-Shiuan Cheng, Rosario Correia, Linzhi Du, Consuelo Garcia de la Torre, Abdul Hamid Safwat Ibrahim, Chin-Kang Jen, Ali Mahdi Kazem, Kilsun Kim, Jian Liang, Eva Malovics, Alice S. Moreira, Richard T. Mpoyi, Anthony Ugochukwu Obiajulu Nnedum, Johnsto E. Osagie, AAhad M. Osman-Gani, Mehmet Ferhat Özbek, Francisco José Costa Pereira, Ruja Pholsward, Horia D. Pitariu, Marko Polic, Elisaveta Gjorgji Sardžoska, Petar Skobic, Allen F. Stembridge, Theresa Li-Na Tang, Caroline Urbain, Martina Trontelj, Luigina Canova, Anna Maria Manganelli, Jingqiu Chen, Ningyu Tang, Bolanle E. Adetoun & Modupe F. Adewuyi - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (4):919-937.
    Monetary intelligence theory asserts that individuals apply their money attitude to frame critical concerns in the context and strategically select certain options to achieve financial goals and ultimate happiness. This study explores the dark side of monetary Intelligence and behavioral economics—dishonesty. Dishonesty, a risky prospect, involves cost–benefit analysis of self-interest. We frame good or bad barrels in the environmental context as a proxy of high or low probability of getting caught for dishonesty, respectively. We theorize: The magnitude and intensity of (...)
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    Attitudes Toward, and Intentions to Report, Academic Cheating Among Students in Singapore.Sean K. B. See & Vivien K. G. Lim - 2001 - Ethics and Behavior 11 (3):261-274.
    In this study, we examined students' attitudes toward cheating and whether they would report instances of cheating they witnessed. Data were collected from three educational institutions in Singapore. A total of 518 students participated in the study. Findings suggest that students perceived cheating behaviors involving exam-related situations to be serious, whereas plagiarism was rated as less serious. Cheating in the form of not contributing one's fair share in a group project was also perceived as a serious form of academic misconduct, (...)
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    Behavioral economics and monetary wisdom: A cross‐level analysis of monetary aspiration, pay (dis)satisfaction, risk perception, and corruption in 32 nations.Thomas Li-Ping Tang, Zhen Li, Mehmet Ferhat Özbek, Vivien K. G. Lim, Thompson S. H. Teo, Mahfooz A. Ansari, Toto Sutarso, Ilya Garber, Randy Ki-Kwan Chiu, Brigitte Charles-Pauvers, Caroline Urbain, Roberto Luna-Arocas, Jingqiu Chen, Ningyu Tang, Theresa Li-Na Tang, Fernando Arias-Galicia, Consuelo Garcia De La Torre, Peter Vlerick, Adebowale Akande, Abdulqawi Salim Al-Zubaidi, Ali Mahdi Kazem, Mark G. Borg, Bor-Shiuan Cheng, Linzhi Du, Abdul Hamid Safwat Ibrahim, Kilsun Kim, Eva Malovics, Richard T. Mpoyi, Obiajulu Anthony Ugochukwu Nnedum, Elisaveta Gjorgji Sardžoska, Michael W. Allen, Rosário Correia, Chin-Kang Jen, Alice S. Moreira, Johnston E. Osagie, AAhad M. Osman-Gani, Ruja Pholsward, Marko Polic, Petar Skobic, Allen F. Stembridge, Luigina Canova, Anna Maria Manganelli, Adrian H. Pitariu & Francisco José Costa Pereira - 2023 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 32 (3):925-945.
    Corruption involves greed, money, and risky decision-making. We explore the love of money, pay satisfaction, probability of risk, and dishonesty across cultures. Avaricious monetary aspiration breeds unethicality. Prospect theory frames decisions in the gains-losses domain and high-low probability. Pay dissatisfaction (in the losses domain) incites dishonesty in the name of justice at the individual level. The Corruption Perceptions Index, CPI, signals a high-low probability of getting caught for dishonesty at the country level. We theorize that decision-makers adopt avaricious love-of-money aspiration (...)
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