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  1.  4
    The Metric Used in the Global Health Impact Project: Implicit Values and Unanswered Questions.Yukiko Asada - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics.
    The core aims of the Global Health Impact Project include incentivizing pharmaceutical companies for socially conscious production and promoting socially conscious consumption among consumers. Its backbone is a metric that computes the amount of illness burden alleviated by a pharmaceutical drug. This essay aims to assess the connection between values and numbers in the Global Health Impact Project. Specifically, I concentrate on two issues, the anonymity of illness burden and the distribution of health benefits. The former issue asks whether we (...)
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  2.  46
    Health Inequalities and Why They Matter.Daniel M. Hausman, Yukiko Asada & Thomas Hedemann - 2002 - Health Care Analysis 10 (2):177-191.
    Health inequalities are of concern both becausestudying them may help one learn how to improvehealth and because health inequalities may beunjust. This paper argues that attending tothese reasons why health inequalities may beimportant undercuts the claims of researchersat the World Health Organization in favor offocusing on individual health variation ratherthan on social group health differences. Inequalities in individual health are of littleinterest unless one goes on to study how theyare related to other factors.
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  3.  31
    Is Health Inequality Across Individuals of Moral Concern?Yukiko Asada - 2006 - Health Care Analysis 14 (1):25-36.
    The history of the documentation of health inequality is long. The way in which health inequality has customarily been documented is by comparing differences in the average health across groups, for example, by sex or gender, income, education, occupation, or geographic region. In the controversial World Health Report 2000, researchers at the World Health Organization criticized this traditional practice and proposed to measure health inequality across individuals irrespective of individuals’ group affiliation. They defended its proposal on the moral grounds without (...)
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  4.  22
    High School Teaching of Bioethics in New Zealand, Australia and Japan.Yukiko Asada, Miho Tsuzuki, Shiro Akiyama, Nobuko Y. Macer & Darryl R. J. Macer - 1996 - Journal of Moral Education 25 (4):401-420.
    Abstract An International Bioethics Education Survey was conducted in Australia (A), Japan (J) and New Zealand (NZ) in mid?1993. National random samples of high schools were selected, and mail response questionnaires were sent to a biology (b) and a social studies (s) teacher at each school through the principals. The number of respondents and response rate were: NZb 206 (55%), NZs 96 (26%), Ab 251 (48%), As 114 (22%), Jb 560 (40%) and Js 383 (27%). This paper compares knowledge and (...)
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  5. 4.5. High School Bioethics Education Network in Japan.Yukiko Asada & Darryl Macer - forthcoming - Bioethics in Asia: The Proceedings of the Unesco Asian Bioethics Conference (Abc'97) and the Who-Assisted Satellite Symposium on Medical Genetics Services, 3-8 Nov, 1997 in Kobe/Fukui, Japan, 3rd Murs Japan International Symposium, 2nd Congress of the Asi.
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  6.  2
    Personal Responsibility for Health: Exploring Together with Lay Persons.Yukiko Asada, Marion Brown, Mary McNally, Andrea Murphy, Robin Urquhart & Grace Warner - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics.
    Emerging parallel to long-standing, academic and policy inquiries on personal responsibility for health is the empirical assessment of lay persons’ views. Yet, previous studies rarely explored personal responsibility for health among lay persons as dynamic societal values. We sought to explore lay persons’ views on personal responsibility for health using the Fairness Dialogues, a method for lay persons to deliberate equity issues in health and health care through a small group dialogue using a hypothetical scenario. We conducted two 2-h Fairness (...)
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  7. Establishment Of High School Bioethics Education Network.Yukiko Asada & Darryl Macer - 1997 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 7 (3):73-77.
     
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