Search results for 'Brian Locke' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Locke (1976/2010). The Correspondence of John Locke. Clarendon Press.score: 240.0
     
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  2. Brian Locke (1998). “Top Dog,” “Black Threat,” and “Japanese Cats”: The Impact of the White-Black Binary on Asian-American Identity. Radical Philosophy Review 1 (2):98-125.score: 240.0
    This essay is a reading of two Hollywood films: The Defiant Ones (1958, directed by Stanley Kramer, starring Tony Curtis and Sidney Poitier) and Rising Sun (1993, directed by Philip Kauffman starring Wesley Snipes and Sean Connery, based on the Michael Crichton novel of the same name). The essay argues that these films work to contain black demand for social and political equality not through exclusionary measures, but rather through deliberate acknowledgment of blackness as integral to US identity. My reading (...)
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  3. Brian Locke (1995). Technology Beyond the Limits? What Can We Do? What Now? Dialogue and Universalism 5 (1-4).score: 240.0
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  4. John Locke (1977). The Locke Reader: Selections From the Works of John Locke: With a General Introd. And Commentary. Cambridge University Press.score: 210.0
    Yolton's introduction and commentary explicate Locke's doctrines and provide the reader with the general background knowledge of other seventeenth-century ...
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  5. John Locke (2002). John Locke: Writings on Religion. Oxford University Press.score: 210.0
    Locke lived at a time of heightened religious sensibility, and religious motives and theological beliefs were fundamental to his philosophical outlook. Here, Victor Nuovo brings together the first comprehensive collection of Locke's writings on religion and theology. These writings illustrate the deep religious motivation in Locke's thought.
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  6. Alain LeRoy Locke (1989). The Philosophy of Alain Locke: Harlem Renaissance and Beyond. Temple University Press.score: 210.0
    Discusses Locke's life and views and their impact on American philosophy, as well as his role in the Harlem Renaissance.
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  7. John Locke (2000). The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: The Reasonableness of Christianity: As Delivered In the Scriptures. Clarendon Press.score: 210.0
    In 1695 John Locke published The Reasonableness of Christianity, an enquiry into the foundations of Christian belief. He did so anonymously, to avoid public involvement in the fiercely partisan religious controversies of the day. In the Reasonableness Locke considered what it was to which all Christians must assent in faith; he argued that the answer could be found by anyone for themselves in the divine revelation of Scripture alone. He maintained that the requirements of Scripture were few and (...)
     
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  8. Victor Nuovo & John Locke (eds.) (1997). John Locke and Christianity: Contemporary Responses to the Reasonableness of Christianity. Thoemmes Press.score: 210.0
    The Reasonableness of Christianity is a major work by one of the greatest modern philosophers. Published anonymously in 1695, it entered a world upset by fierce theological conflict and immediately became a subject of controversy. At issue were the author’s intentions. John Edwards labelled it a Socinian work and charged that it was subversive not only of Christianity but of religion itself others praised it as a sure preservative of both. Few understood Locke’s intentions, and perhaps no one fully. (...)
     
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  9. John Locke (1997). Collected Works of John Locke. Routledge.score: 210.0
    This first octavo edition of John Locke's Works has set the pattern for all subsequent English Works editions until the present time. It contains all the famous philosophical writings, as well as a life of the author based on that of Le Clerc but using a large number of unpublished letters. For the first time all correspondence is placed together, and the non-correspondence items in Desmaizeaux's Collection are repositioned to follow the relevant works. Set in context with a new (...)
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  10. Mechanism Locke (2010). Lough, John, Locke's Travels in France. In S. J. Savonius-Wroth Paul Schuurman & Jonathen Walmsley (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Locke. Continuum. 249.score: 210.0
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  11. John Locke (1989). The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: Some Thoughts Concerning Education. Clarendon Press.score: 210.0
    One of the major works of John Locke (1632-1704), this detailed and comprehensive guide is mainly concerned with moral education. While concentrating on its role in creating a responsible adult and on the importance of virtue as a transmitter of culture, it also ranges over such practical topics as the effectiveness of physical punishment, how best to teach foreign languages, table manners, and varieties of crying. -/- This critical edition is based on the third (1695) edition, and includes variants (...)
     
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  12. John Locke (1990). The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: Drafts for the Essay Concerning Human Understanding, and Other Philosophical Writings: In Three Volumes: Volume 1: Drafts A and B. Clarendon Press.score: 210.0
    This is the first of three volumes which will contain all of Locke's extant philosophical writings relating to An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, not included in other Clarendon editions like the Correspondence. It contains the earliest known drafts of the Essay, Drafts A and B, both written in 1671, and provides for the first time an accurate version of Locke's text. Virtually all his changes are recorded in footnotes on each page. -/- Peter Nidditch, whose highly acclaimed edition (...)
     
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  13. John Locke (1978). The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: Correspondence: Volume III. Letters 849-1241. Clarendon Press.score: 210.0
    A scholarly edition of The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: Correspondence: Letters 849-1241 by E. S. de Beer. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.
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  14. John Locke (1978). The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: Correspondence: Volume IV. Letters 1242-1701. Clarendon Press.score: 210.0
    A scholarly edition of The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: Correspondence: Letters 1242-1701 by E. S. de Beer. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.
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  15. John Locke (1979). The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: Correspondence: Volume V. Letters 1702-2198. Clarendon Press.score: 210.0
    A scholarly edition of The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: Correspondence: Letters 1702-2198 by E. S. de Beer. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.
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  16. John Locke (1980). The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: Correspondence: Volume VI. Letters 2199-2664. Clarendon Press.score: 210.0
    A scholarly edition of The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: Correspondence: Letters 2199-2664 by E. S. de Beer. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.
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  17. John Locke (1981). The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: Correspondence: Volume VII. Letters 2665-3286. Clarendon Press.score: 210.0
    A scholarly edition of The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: Correspondence: Letters 2665-3286 by E. S. de Beer. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.
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  18. John Locke (1989). The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: Correspondence: Volume VIII. Letters 3287-3648. Clarendon Press.score: 210.0
    This penultimate volume of John Locke's correspondence covers the period from 15 May 1703 to 23 August 1704.
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  19. John Locke (1987). The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: A Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St. Paul: Volume II. Clarendon Press.score: 210.0
    Locke's posthumously published work on Galatians, 1 and 2 Corinthians, Romans and Ephesians, provides important evidence of his thought during the final years of his life, ad gives insights into his theology which are not available in his other writings. This critical edition of the work is based as far as possible on Locke's manuscript, and includes an editorial introduction, textual, manuscript, and explanatory notes, as well as transcriptions of hitherto unpublished papers by Locke.
     
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  20. John Locke, The Works of John Locke (in 9 Vols.).score: 180.0
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  21. John Locke & Maurice Cranston (1949). John Locke. Philosophy 24 (90):287-.score: 180.0
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  22. John Locke (2011). John Locke, Christian Mission, and Colonial America. Modern Intellectual History 8 (2):267-297.score: 180.0
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  23. John Locke (1936). An Early Draft of Locke's Essay. Oxford, the Clarendon Press.score: 180.0
  24. John Locke (1982). Draft B of Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding: The Fullest Extant Autograph Version. Dept. Of Philosophy, University of Sheffield.score: 180.0
  25. John Locke (1976). John Locke: Correspondence: Volume II Letters 462-848. OUP Oxford.score: 180.0
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  26. John Locke (2002). John Locke: Essays on the Law of Nature: The Latin Text with a Translation, Introduction, and Notes ; Together with Transcripts of Locke's Shorthand in His Journal for 1676. Clarendon Press,Oxford University Press ;.score: 180.0
    Written before his better-known philosophical works, these essays fully explain how natural law is known and to what extent it is binding.
     
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  27. John Locke & P. Laslett (2007). John Locke, From TwoTreatises of Government (1690). In Ian Carter, Matthew H. Kramer & Hillel Steiner (eds.), Freedom: A Philosophical Anthology. Blackwell Pub.. 93.score: 180.0
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  28. John Locke (1966). John Locke's of the Conduct of the Understanding. New York, Teachers College Press.score: 180.0
     
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  29. John Locke (1965). Locke on Politics, Religion, and Education. New York, Collier Books.score: 180.0
     
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  30. John Locke (1986). Rabb, J. Douglas, John Locke on Reflection. A Phenomenology Lost, Lanham, Center for Advanced Research in Phenomenology and University Press of America. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (3).score: 180.0
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  31. John Locke (1979). The Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Clarendon Press.score: 180.0
    A scholarly edition of Essay Concerning Human Understanding by P. H. Nidditch. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.
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  32. John Locke (1927). The Correspondence of John Locke and Edward Clarke. London, Oxford University Press, H. Milford.score: 180.0
  33. John Locke (2005). The Selected Political Writings of John Locke: Texts, Background Selections, Sources, Interpretations. W.W. Norton.score: 180.0
  34. A. John Simmons (2009). Locke on the Death Penalty. Philosophy 69 (270):471-.score: 54.0
    Brian Calvert has offered us a clear and careful analysis of Locke's views on punishment and capital punishment. The primary goal of his paper - that of correcting the misperception of Locke as a wholehearted proponent of capital punishment for a wide range of offenses - must be allowed to be both laudable and largely achieved in his discussion. But Calvert's analysis also encourages, I think, a number of serious misunderstandings of Locke's true position.
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  35. Scott M. Williams (2012). Indexicals and the Trinity: Two Non-Social Models. Journal of Analytic Theology 1 (1):74-94.score: 54.0
    In recent analytic literature on the Trinity we have seen a variety of "social" models of the Trinity. By contrast there are few "non-­‐social" models. One prominent "non-­‐social" view is Brian Leftow's "Latin Trinity." I argue that the name of Leftow's model is not sufficiently descriptive in light of diverse models within Latin speaking theology. Next, I develop a new "non-­‐social" model that is inspired by Richard of St. Victor's description of a person in conjunction with my appropriating insights (...)
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  36. T. Brian Mooney & Anthony Imbrosciano (2005). The Curious Case of Mr. Locke's Miracles. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 57 (3):147 - 168.score: 42.0
    Locke considers miracles to be crucial in establishing the credibility and reasonableness of Christian faith and revelation. The performance of miracles, he argues, is vital in establishing the “credit of the proposer” who makes any claim to providing a divine revelation. He accords reason a pivotal role in distinguishing spurious from genuine claims to divine revelation, including miracles. According to Locke, genuine miracles contain the hallmark of the divine such that pretend revelations become intuitively obvious. This paper argues (...)
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  37. Brian Calvert (1993). Locke on Punishment and the Death Penalty. Philosophy 68 (264):211 - 229.score: 36.0
  38. Brian Cooney (1973). John Sergeant's Criticism of Locke's Theory of Ideas. Modern Schoolman 50 (2):143-158.score: 36.0
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  39. Daniel Z. Korman (2010). Locke on Substratum: A Deflationary Interpretation. Locke Studies 10:61-84.score: 27.0
    I defend an interpretation of Locke’s remarks on substratum according to which substrata not only have sensible qualities but are just familiar things and stuffs: horses, stones, gold, wax, and snow. The supporting relation that holds between substrata and the qualities that they support is simply the familiar relation of having, or instantiating, which holds between a particular substance and its qualities. I address the obvious objection to the interpretation -- namely, that it cannot be reconciled with Locke’s (...)
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  40. Peter Martin Jaworski (2011). The Metaphysics of Locke's Labour View. Locke Studies 11:73-106.score: 27.0
    This paper is an evaluation of John Locke's labour theory of property. Section I sets out Locke's labour view. Section II addresses several possible objections, including against the conceptual coherence of Locke's argument, against the metaphysical implications of his view, as well as foundational criticisms of the moral significance of labour and of my relations with objects that are grounded in labour under certain conditions and circumstances. I attempt to address each of these criticisms in a Lockian (...)
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  41. Gabor Forrai (2010). Locke on Substance in General. Locke Studies 10 (27):27-59.score: 27.0
    Locke’s conception of substance in general or substratum has two relatively widespread interpretations. According to one, substance in general is the bearer of properties, a pure subject, something which sustains properties but itself has no properties. I will call this interpretation traditional, because it has already been formulated by Leibniz. According to the other interpretation, substance is general is something like real essence: an underlying structure which is responsible for the fact that certain observable properties form stable, recurrent clusters. (...)
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  42. Walter Ott (1997). Locke and the Scholastics on Theological Discourse. Locke Studies 28 (1):51-66.score: 27.0
    On the face of it, Locke rejects the scholastics' main tool for making sense of talk of God, namely, analogy. Instead, Locke claims that we generate an idea of God by 'enlarging' our ideas of some attributes (such as knowledge) with the idea of infinity. Through an analysis of Locke's idea of infinity, I argue that he is in fact not so distant from the scholastics and in particular must rely on analogy of inequality.
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  43. Han Thomas Adriaenssen (2011). An Early Critic of Locke: The Anti-Scepticism of Henry Lee. Locke Studies 11:17-47.score: 27.0
    Although Henry Lee is often recognized to be an important early critic of Locke's 'way of ideas', his Anti-Scepticism (1702) has hardly received the scholarly attention it deserves. This paper seeks to fill that lacuna. It argues that Lee's criticism of Locke's alleged representationalism was original, and that it was quite different from the more familiar kind of criticism that was launched against Locke's theory of ideas by such thinkers as John Sergeant and Thomas Reid. In addition, (...)
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  44. Julie Walsh (2010). 'Things for Actions': Locke's Mistake in 'Of Power'. Locke Studies 10 (2010):85-94.score: 27.0
    In a letter to William Molyneux John Locke states that in reviewing his chapter 'Of Power' for the second edition of An Essay Concerning Human Understanding he noticed that he had made one mistake which, now corrected, has put him "into a new view of things" which will clarify his account of human freedom. Locke says the mistake was putting “things for actions” on p.123 of the first edition, a page on which the word 'things' does not appear (...)
     
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  45. Helga Varden (2006). Locke's Waste Restriction and His Strong Voluntarism. Locke Studies 6:127-141.score: 27.0
    This paper argues that there is a conflict between two principles informing Locke’s political philosophy, namely his waste restriction and his strong voluntarism. Locke’s waste restriction is proposed as a necessary, enforceable restriction upon rightful private property holdings and it yields arguments to preserve and redistribute natural resources. Locke’s strong voluntarism is proposed as the liberal ideal of political obligations. It expresses Locke’s view that each individual has a natural political power, which can only be transferred (...)
     
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  46. Shelley Weinberg (2011). Locke on Personal Identity. Philosophy Compass 6 (6):398-407.score: 24.0
    Locke’s account of personal identity has been highly influential because of its emphasis on a psychological criterion. The same consciousness is required for being the same person. It is not so clear, however, exactly what Locke meant by ‘consciousness’ or by ‘having the same consciousness’. Interpretations vary: consciousness is seen as identical to memory, as identical to a first personal appropriation of mental states, and as identical to a first personal distinctive experience of the qualitative features of one’s (...)
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  47. Samuel C. Rickless (1997). Locke on Primary and Secondary Qualities. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (3):297-319.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I argue that Book II, Chapter viii of Locke' Essay is a unified, self-consistent whole, and that the appearance of inconsistency is due largely to anachronistic misreadings and misunderstandings. The key to the distinction between primary and secondary qualities is that the former are, while the latter are not, real properties, i.e., properties that exist in bodies independently of being perceived. Once the distinction is properly understood, it becomes clear that Locke's arguments for it are (...)
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  48. Stewart Duncan, Toland and Locke in the Leibniz-Burnett Correspondence.score: 24.0
    Leibniz's correspondence with Thomas Burnett of Kemnay is probably best known for Leibniz's attempts to communicate with Locke via Burnett. But Burnett was also, more generally a source of English intellectual news for Leibniz. As such, Burnett provided an important part of the context in which Locke was presented to and understood by Leibniz. -/- This paper examines the Leibniz-Burnett correspondence, and argues against Jolley's suggestion that "the context in which Leibniz learned about Locke was primarily a (...)
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  49. Shelley Weinberg (2012). The Metaphysical Fact of Consciousness in Locke's Theory of Personal Identity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (3):387-415.score: 24.0
    Locke’s theory of personal identity was philosophically groundbreaking for its attempt to establish a non-substantial identity condition. Locke states, “For the same consciousness being preserv’d, whether in the same or different Substances, the personal Identity is preserv’d” (II.xxvii.13). Many have interpreted Locke to think that consciousness identifies a self both synchronically and diachronically by attributing thoughts and actions to a self. Thus, many have attributed to Locke either a memory theory or an appropriation theory of personal (...)
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