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M. Ardagh [3]Michael Ardagh [1]
  1. Michael Ardagh (2001). Comment On: Resurrecting Autonomy During Resuscitations. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (1):64-65.
     
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  2. M. Ardagh (2000). Futility has No Utility in Resuscitation Medicine. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (5):396-399.
    “Futility” is a word which means the absence of benefit. It has been used to describe an absence of utility in resuscitation endeavours but it fails to do this. Futility does not consider the harms of resuscitation and we should consider the balance of benefit and harm that results from our resuscitation endeavours. If a resuscitation is futile then any harm that ensues will bring about an unfavourable benefit/harm balance. However, even if the endeavour is not futile, by any definition, (...)
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  3. M. Ardagh (1999). Resurrecting Autonomy During Resuscitation--The Concept of Professional Substituted Judgment. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (5):375-378.
    The urgency of the resuscitation and the impaired ability of the patient to make a reasonable autonomous decision both conspire against adequate consideration of the principles of medical ethics. Informed consent is usually not possible for these reasons and this leads many to consider that consent is not required for resuscitation, because resuscitation brings benefit and prevents harm and because the patient is not in a position to give or withhold consent. However, consent for resuscitation is required and the common (...)
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  4. M. Ardagh (1997). May We Practise Endotracheal Intubation on the Newly Dead? Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (5):289-294.
    Endotracheal intubation (ETI) is a valuable procedure which must be learnt and practised, and performing ETI on cadavers is probably the best way to do this, although lesser alternatives do exist. Performing ETI on a cadaver is viewed with a real and reasonable repugnance and if it is done without proper authorisation it might be illegal. Some form of consent is required. Presumed consent would preferably be governed by statute and should only occur if the community is well informed and (...)
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