In Steven M. Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. Wiley (2013)

Authors
Jake H. Davis
New York University
Evan Thompson
University of British Columbia
Abstract
Buddhism originated and developed in an Indian cultural context that featured many first-person practices for producing and exploring states of consciousness through the systematic training of attention. In contrast, the dominant methods of investigating the mind in Western cognitive science have emphasized third-person observation of the brain and behavior. In this chapter, we explore how these two different projects might prove mutually beneficial. We lay the groundwork for a cross-cultural cognitive science by using one traditional Buddhist model of the mind – that of the five aggregates – as a lens for examining contemporary cognitive science conceptions of consciousness.
Keywords Mindfulness  Attention  Consciousness  Buddhism  Meditation
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Meditation and Self-Control.Noa Latham - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (7):1779-1798.

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