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  1.  9
    La Condamine's Scientific Journey Down the River Amazon, 1743–1744.Anita McConnell - 1991 - Annals of Science 48 (1):1-19.
    The French astronomer La Condamine, sent to Perú to measure an arc of the meridian in 1736, decided to return to France by way of the River Amazon, mapping the river and collecting observations of all sorts. This intention was over-optimistic and the circumstances of the journey prevented La Condamine from gathering much new information or undertaking the necessary observations to improve existing maps. He published three popular versions of the journey but witheld most of the observations that he did (...)
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  2.  6
    The History of the Rossbank Observatory, Tasmania.Ann Savours & Anita McConnell - 1982 - Annals of Science 39 (6):527-564.
    Rossbank functioned from 1840 to 1854 as one of a chain of British Colonial Observatories which combined with European and Asian observatories in the study of terrestrial magnetism. It was established in Hobart, Tasmania, by the Governor of Van Diemen's Land, Sir John Franklin, and Captain James Clark Ross, R.N., commanding H.M. ships Erebus and Terror. The history and operation of the Rossbank Observatory is related, its instruments described, and the results discussed.Biographical notes on the Observatory staff, with lists of (...)
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  3.  13
    The Scientific Life of William Scoresby Jnr, with a Catalogue of His Instruments and Apparatus in the Whitby Museum.Anita McConnell - 1986 - Annals of Science 43 (3):257-286.
    William Scoresby Jnr spent the first years of his working life as a whaler, and then became an ordained minister of the Church of England. His early writings on the environment of the Greenland Sea gained him a reputation as an Arctic scientist. In the later part of his life he turned to the investigation of magnetism as it concerned the ship's compass, trying to find the best form of needle, and how the compass was affected by the magnetism of (...)
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  4.  17
    Gerard L'E Turner: Nineteenth-Century Scientific Instruments. London: Sotheby Publications, 1983, and Berkeley, Calif: Univ. Of California Press, 1983. 320 Pp. ISBN 0-85667-170-3 , £37.50. ISBN 0-520-05160-2. [REVIEW]Anita Mcconnell - 1985 - British Journal for the History of Science 18 (1):121-121.
  5. Instrument Makers to the World. A History of Cooke, Troughton & Simms.Anita McConnell & Joyce Brown - 1994 - Annals of Science 51 (3):321-322.
     
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  6.  7
    Mari E. W. Williams, The Precision Makers: A History of the Instruments Industry in Britain and France, 1870–1939. London: Routledge, 1993. Pp. Viii + 216. ISBN 0-415-03732-8. £40.00. [REVIEW]Anita Mcconnell - 1995 - British Journal for the History of Science 28 (1):120-121.
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  7.  6
    A Brief History of Geomagnetism and a Catalog of the Collection of the National Museum of American History. Robert P. Multhauf, Gregory Good.Anita McConnell - 1987 - Isis 78 (4):611-612.
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  8.  6
    Bankruptcy Proceedings Against William Harris, Optician, of Cornhill, 1830.Anita McConnell - 1994 - Annals of Science 51 (3):273-279.
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  9.  6
    Origins of the Marine Barometer.Anita McConnell - 2005 - Annals of Science 62 (1):83-101.
    In 1668 Robert Hooke recognised the utility of a barometer which could foretell storms at sea, but neither he nor his contemporaries in Britain or elsewhere in Europe succeeded in constructing such an instrument which would work reliably on a moving ship. Theorists and instrument makers, including Hooke, Amontons, De Luc, Passement, Magellan and Blondeau proposed novel forms of tube, but at the time it was not possible to work glass to the suggested shape. The competition between France and England (...)
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  10.  3
    Aluminium and its Alloys for Scientific Instruments, 1855–1900.Anita McConnell - 1989 - Annals of Science 46 (6):611-620.
    Among the first artefacts of aluminium exhibited at the Paris Exposition of 1855 were scientific instruments. France retained this lead, with her craftsmen employing the metal in balance-beams, telescopes, binoculars, sextants, and anemometer vanes. Within a few years instrument-makers in other countries took up the use of aluminium-bronze alloys, which offered greater strength and rigidity. These alloys served in the construction of various precision astronomical, surveying, and other instruments. Differing reports on aluminium, its alloys, and their qualities were largely due (...)
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  11. Book Reviews-Biographies-King of the Clinicals: The Life and Times of JJ Hicks (1837-1916).Anita McConnell & A. B. Davis - 1999 - Annals of Science 56 (4):461.
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