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  1.  20
    Philosophizing About Teacher Dissatisfaction: A Multidisciplinary Hermeneutic Approach.Doris A. Santoro - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (2):171-180.
    In this methodological reflection, I describe the multidisciplinary hermeneutic process of philosophizing about teacher dissatisfaction. I discuss how philosophy serves as a starting point for interpretive work based on interviews with former teachers and readings of qualitative and quantitative research on teacher attrition and dissatisfaction. The result has been a project that enabled me to offer new descriptions of phenomena and to develop concepts that can be used to interpret the moral dimensions of teacher dissatisfaction. The fact that I return (...)
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  2.  14
    “We're Not Going to Do That Because It's Not Right”: Using Pedagogical Responsibility to Reframe the Doublespeak of Fidelity.Doris A. Santoro - 2016 - Educational Theory 66 (1-2):263-277.
    In this essay, Doris Santoro examines the discourse of “fidelity of instruction” to show how it is doublespeak for teacher compliance that is incompatible with democracy and education. Analyzing the distorted use of the term “fidelity” by market-based reformers, Santoro illustrates how it can be used as a weapon against teacher intelligence and moral response. She argues that John Dewey's philosophy provides conceptual resources to reframe some teacher infidelity as intelligent response, the moral agency required for pedagogical responsibility.
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  3.  30
    Review of Gert J.J. Biesta, The Beautiful Risk of Education. [REVIEW]Doris A. Santoro & Samuel D. Rocha - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):413-418.
    In The Beautiful Risk of Education, Gert Biesta displays his gift for engaging generously with the thought of others to illuminate what makes education educational, that is, the value in maintaining the complexity and risk involved in a dialogic approach to education. As Biesta puts it, “[education] is therefore, again, a dialogical process. This makes the educational way the slow way, the difficult way, the frustrating way, and so we might say, the weak way” . Such a view of education (...)
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  4.  23
    Philosophy Pursued Through Empirical Research: Introduction to the Special Issue.Terri S. Wilson & Doris A. Santoro - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (2):115-124.
    Many scholars have pursued philosophical inquiry through empirical research. These empirical projects have been shaped—to varying degrees and in different ways—by philosophical questions, traditions, frameworks and analytic approaches. This issue explores the methodological challenges and opportunities involved in these kinds of projects. In this essay, we briefly introduce the nine projects featured in this issue and then address two key questions: First, how do these diverse contributors understand their empirical research as a mode of philosophical inquiry? And, second, what is (...)
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  5.  47
    Review of Sharon Todd, Toward an Imperfect Education: Facing Humanity, Rethinking Cosmopolitanism. [REVIEW]Doris A. Santoro - 2011 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (3):303-310.
  6.  28
    Political Goals and Social Ideals: Dewey, Democracy, and the Emergence of the Turkish Republic.Charles Dorn & Doris A. Santoro - 2011 - Education and Culture 27 (2):3-27.
    Only months following the declaration of the Turkish Republic in October 1923, Turkey’s newly appointed Minister of Public Instruction, Sefa Bey, invited U.S. philosopher and educator John Dewey to survey his fledgling country’s educational system. Having just emerged from a brutal war for independence, Turkey was beginning a process of rapid modernization under the leadership of Mustafa Kemal “Atatürk,” and government officials looked to Dewey for recommendations on how to make Turkish schools agencies of social reform that would advance their (...)
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  7. Demoralized: Why Teachers Leave the Profession They Love and How They Can Stay.Doris A. Santoro - 2018 - Harvard Education Press.
    _Demoralized: Why Teachers Leave the Profession They Love and How They Can Stay_ offers a timely analysis of professional dissatisfaction that challenges the common explanation of burnout. Featuring the voices of educators, the book offers concrete lessons for practitioners, school leaders, and policy makers on how to think more strategically to retain experienced teachers and make a difference in the lives of students. Based on ten years of research and interviews with practitioners across the United States, the book theorizes the (...)
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  8. Principled Resistance: How Teachers Resolve Ethical Dilemmas.Doris A. Santoro & Lizabeth Cain (eds.) - 2018 - Harvard Education Press.
    _Principled Resistance: How Teachers Resolve Ethical Dilemmas_ brings together senior scholars and activist teachers to explore the concept of resistance as a necessary response to mandates that conflict with their understanding of quality teaching. The book provides vivid examples of the pedagogical, professional, and democratic principles undergirding resistance, as well as the distinct perspective of each of its contributors: teachers who reflect on their acts of principled resistance; teacher educators who study teachers and support their professional growth; and historians who (...)
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