6 found
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  1.  39
    Stable Implicit Motor Processes Despite Aerobic Locomotor Fatigue.R. S. W. Masters, J. M. Poolton & J. P. Maxwell - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):335-338.
    Implicit processes almost certainly preceded explicit processes in our evolutionary history, so they are likely to be more resistant to disruption according to the principles of evolutionary biology [Reber, A. S. . The cognitive unconscious: An evolutionary perspective. Consciousness and Cognition, 1, 93–133.]. Previous work . Knowledge, nerves and know-how: The role of explicit versus implicit knowledge in the breakdown of a complex motor skill under pressure. British Journal of Psychology, 83, 343–358.]) has shown that implicitly learned motor skills remain (...)
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  2.  28
    The Role of Working Memory in Motor Learning and Performance.J. P. Maxwell, R. S. W. Masters & F. F. Eves - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):376-402.
    Three experiments explore the role of working memory in motor skill acquisition and performance. Traditional theories postulate that skill acquisition proceeds through stages of knowing, which are initially declarative but later procedural. The reported experiments challenge that view and support an independent, parallel processing model, which predicts that procedural and declarative knowledge can be acquired separately and that the former does not depend on the availability of working memory, whereas, the latter does. The behaviour of these two processes was manipulated (...)
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  3.  74
    Benefits of an External Focus of Attention: Common Coding or Conscious Processing?J. M. Poolton, J. P. Maxwell, R. S. W. Masters & M. Raab - 2006 - Journal of Sports Sciences 24 (1):89-99.
  4.  15
    Passing Thoughts on the Evolutionary Stability of Implicit Motor Behaviour: Performance Retention Under Physiological Fatigue.J. M. Poolton, R. S. W. Masters & J. P. Maxwell - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2):456-468.
    Heuristics of evolutionary biology dictate that phylogenetically older processes are inherently more stable and resilient to disruption than younger processes. On the grounds that non-declarative behaviour emerged long before declarative behaviour, Reber argues that implicit learning is supported by neural processes that are evolutionarily older than those supporting explicit learning. Reber suggested that implicit learning thus leads to performance that is more robust than explicit learning. Applying this evolutionary framework to motor performance, we examined whether implicit motor learning, relative to (...)
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  5. Barbara H. Basden, David R. Basden, and Matthew J. Wright. Part-List Reexposure and Release Of.J. P. Maxwell, R. S. W. Masters, F. F. Eves, R. P. Behrendt, Jonathan M. Smallwood, Simona F. Baracaia, Michelle Lowe & Marc Obonsawin - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12:320.
  6.  8
    Erratum to “Passing Thoughts on the Evolutionary Stability of Implicit Motor Behaviour: Performance Retention Under Physiological Fatigue” [Consiousness and Cognition, 16, 456–468, 2007]. [REVIEW]J. M. Poolton, R. S. W. Masters & J. P. Maxwell - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):408-408.