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James Haden [7]James C. Haden [1]
  1.  42
    Friendship in Plato's "Lysis".James Haden - 1983 - Review of Metaphysics 37 (2):327 - 356.
    PHILOSOPHY has always made use of its past. In doing so, it resembles literature more than it does the natural sciences, which generally regard the scientific concepts and systems of history as superseded, useless hulks drifting in the wake of empirical and conceptual progress. Literature, on the contrary, cherishes the monumental achievements of previous ages; they retain value and importance, and can be turned to for interest and for inspiration again and again. Philosophy has sometimes claimed to take a radical (...)
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  2.  9
    Copernicus: And the History of Science.James Haden - 1959 - Review of Metaphysics 13 (1):79 - 108.
    One cannot blame all this on the dead hand of, say, the Aristotelian conception of First Philosophy, although that and other classic positions have played their part. It can hardly be held that those who doctrinally profess allegiance to the conception of philosophy as created in the image of science have helped much more than they have hindered. Accepting the older, orthodox account of the course of previous philosophic thinking as detached from science, they have been happier demonstrating their predecessors' (...)
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  3.  20
    Did Plato Refute Protagoras?James Haden - 1984 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 1 (3):225 - 240.
  4. Kant's Life and Thought.James Haden (ed.) - 1983 - Yale University Press.
    “Here is the first Kant-biography in English since Paulsen’s and Cassirer’s only full-scale study of Kant’s philosophy. On a very deep level, all of Cassirer’s philosophy was based on Kant’s, and accordingly this book is Cassirer’s explicit coming to terms with his own historical origins. It sensitively integrates interesting facts about Kant’s life with an appreciation and critique of his works. Its value is enhanced by Stephen Körner’s Introduction, which places Cassirer’s Kant-interpretation in its historical and contemporary context.”—Lewis White Beck (...)
     
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  5.  20
    On Socrates, with Reference to Gregory Vlastos.James Haden - 1979 - Review of Metaphysics 33 (2):371 - 389.
    IN HIS ESSAY The Paradox of Socrates," Gregory Vlastos paints a vivid and moving portrait of Socrates, or, as he puts it: "the Platonic Socrates, or, to be more precise, the Socrates of Plato’s early dialogues." That the man who emerges from these early dialogues is something very like the actual Socrates is Vlastos’s opinion. He argues, with great plausibility, that the Xenophontic Socrates is not a man who, on the one hand, could have provoked the Athenians into indicting him (...)
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  6.  12
    The Challenge of the History of Science: Part II.James Haden - 1953 - Review of Metaphysics 7 (2):262 - 281.
    The character of these books should be less unexpected when one notes that their author, A. C. Crombie, is not only lecturer in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University College, London, but is also the editor of The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science. One would expect, then, that his approach to the problems of the philosophy of science would naturally proceed through the history of science, and that he would be less interested in elaborating the (...)
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  7.  13
    The Challenge of the History of Science: Part I.James C. Haden - 1953 - Review of Metaphysics 7 (1):74 - 88.
    The watershed for the latter discipline was the establishment of the Hegelian philosophy, with its thesis that the history of philosophy was philosophy itself. Hegel's lectures on the history of philosophy appeared posthumously but his influence was already confirmed. The first really inclusive history of science which is of more than antiquarian interest, William Whewell's History of the Inductive Sciences, was published almost simultaneously in 1837. For Whewell as well as for Hegel, history and philosophy were connected; Whewell's History was (...)
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  8. First Introduction to the Critique of Judgment.Immanuel Kant & James Haden - 1965 - Bobbs-Merrill.