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  1.  19
    From Gegenstand_ to _Gegenstehenlassen: On the Meanings of Objectivity in Heidegger and Hegel.Johan de Jong - 2020 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 28 (3):390-410.
    One of Heidegger’s enduring concerns was to develop an original meditation on the meaning of the present. Integral to this attempt is his critique of the understanding of the bein...
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  2.  32
    Why should states fund denominational schools?Johan De Jong & Ger Snik - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (4):573–587.
    It is generally accepted that liberal states should fund public schools for compulsory education. But whether states should also finance denominational schools is controversial. Does such funding not compromise the principle of liberal neutrality? In this article we evaluate two opposing views on this question. Both views give different interpretations of liberal neutrality and both have contrasting views on the relation between education and conceptions of the good. Arguing that neither view is convincing, we defend an alternative view, which holds (...)
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  3.  96
    On the biomedicalization of alcoholism.Ron Berghmans, Johan de Jong, Aad Tibben & Guido de Wert - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (4):311-321.
    The shift in the prevailing view of alcoholism from a moral paradigm towards a biomedical paradigm is often characterized as a form of biomedicalization. We will examine and critique three reasons offered for the claim that viewing alcoholism as a disease is morally problematic. The first is that the new conceptualization of alcoholism as a chronic brain disease will lead to individualization, e.g., a too narrow focus on the individual person, excluding cultural and social dimensions of alcoholism. The second claim (...)
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  4.  5
    The movement of showing: indirect method, critique, and responsibility in Derrida, Hegel, and Heidegger.Johan de Jong - 2020 - Albany: State University of New York Press.
    The Movement of Showing investigates the idea, shared by Derrida, Hegel and Heidegger, that the value of their thought is not found in its results or conclusions, but in its "movement." All three describe the heart of their work in terms of a pathway, development, or movement rather than in terms of its propositions or conclusions. This seems to deprive their thought of a solid ground, and indeed deconstruction in particular is often criticized in this way. Johan de Jong argues (...)
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  5.  2
    The Senses of Nietzsche’s “Complete Irresponsibility”.Johan de Jong - forthcoming - Nietzsche Studien.
    With his doctrine of the “complete irresponsibility of man,” Nietzsche in different ways complicates the opposition between responsibility and irresponsibility. This article traces the different and conflicting senses of irresponsibility throughout Nietzsche’s development. First, the doctrine is shown to build on Nietzsche’s early study of Heraclitus (section I), whom Nietzsche admired for expounding and embodying a radical “innocence” that was both responsible and irresponsible in different senses. When presented as “philosophical conviction” in Human, All too Human, Nietzsche paradoxically speculates about (...)
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  6.  33
    Preventive intervention in families at risk: The limits of liberalism.Ger Snik, Johan De Jong & Wouter Van Haaften - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (2):181–193.
    There is an increasing call for preventive state interventions in so-called families at risk—that is, interventions before any overt harm has been done by parents to their children or by the children to a third party, in families that are statistically known to be liable to harm children. One of the basic principles of liberal morality, however, is the citizen's right to be free from state intervention so long as no demonstrable harm has been done. On the other hand, Joel (...)
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  7.  3
    Preventive Intervention in Families at Risk: the Limits of Liberalism.Ger Snik, Johan De Jong & Wouter Van Haaften - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (2):181-193.
    There is an increasing call for preventive state interventions in so-called families at risk—that is, interventions before any overt harm has been done by parents to their children or by the children to a third party, in families that are statistically known to be liable to harm children. One of the basic principles of liberal morality, however, is the citizen’s right to be free from state intervention so long as no demonstrable harm has been done. On the other hand, Joel (...)
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  8.  30
    Why liberal state funding of denominational schools cannot be unconditional: A reply to Neil Burtonwood.Ger Snik & Johan De Jong - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (1):113–122.
    In this article we take up Burtonwood's criticism of our view that liberal states should, under certain conditions, fund denominational schools. We not only reject his plea for the accommodation of strong faith schools by liberalism but also criticise his portrayal of the character of the conflict between liberals and strong faith school advocates. Arguing that liberalism is not part of the diversity of goods, we maintain that liberals and strong faith school advocates should not be seen as competing on (...)
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  9.  9
    Why Liberal State Funding of Denominational Schools Cannot be Unconditional: a reply to Neil Burtonwood.Ger Snik & Johan De Jong - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (1):113-122.
    In this article we take up Burtonwood’s criticism of our view that liberal states should, under certain conditions, fund denominational schools. We not only reject his plea for the accommodation of strong faith schools by liberalism but also criticise his portrayal of the character of the conflict between liberals and strong faith school advocates. Arguing that liberalism is not part of the diversity of goods, we maintain that liberals and strong faith school advocates should not be seen as competing on (...)
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  10.  24
    Why Should States Fund Denominational Schools?Johan De Jong & Ger Snik - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (4):573-587.
    It is generally accepted that liberal states should fund public schools for compulsory education. But whether states should also finance denominational schools is controversial. Does such funding not compromise the principle of liberal neutrality? In this article we evaluate two opposing views on this question. Both views give different interpretations of liberal neutrality and both have contrasting views on the relation between education and conceptions of the good. Arguing that neither view is convincing, we defend an alternative view, which holds (...)
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