About this topic
Summary Autonomy is one of the most often discussed topics in modern and contemporary philosophy.  It is key to some moral theories, some political philosophies, and, of course, central to understanding the nature of personhood.  Unsurprisingly, then, there are significant disagreements about the nature of autonomy.  There are thinner and thicker understandings of autonomy throughout the literature.  There are moral and political demands that autonomy be protected or promoted.  Its use as a central value in applied ethics is standard.  Generally speaking, then, there are disagreements about what autonomy is and how and why it matters in moral theory and political philosophy.
Key works It is difficult to say what would count as a "key work" here.  Historically, Kant is likely the most important author to consider.  His deontological moral theory rests on a particularly thick conception of autonomy. For a detailed historical overview of autonomy in modern philosophy, it may be best to start with J.B. Schneewind's 1998 The Invention of Autonomy.
Introductions Perhaps the best place to start considering the nature of autonomy is Stephen Darwall's 2006. See also John Christman's SEP entry.
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  1. Democratic Failures and the Ethics of Democracy.Adam Lovett - 2024 - Philadelphia: Democracy, Citizenship, and Company.
    This book is about the ways in which real-world democracies fall short of democratic ideals and why those shortfalls matter. The project is rooted in a vast body of empirical findings that political scientists have accumulated over the last seven decades. These are findings about political ignorance, voter behaviour, the policymaking process, polarization, and the popular control of representatives. These findings are often both surprising and troubling—they suggest our democracies fall far short of democratic ideals. The book is a detailed, (...)
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  2. From Boredom to Authenticity Bubbles: The Implication of Boredom-Induced Social Media Use for Individual Autonomy.Frodo Podschwadek & Annie Runkel - 2024 - Philosophy and Technology 37 (2):1-16.
    In this paper, we argue that boredom can be an important experience that contributes to personal autonomous agency by providing authentic motivation, and that strategies of social media providers to bind users’ attention to their platforms undermine this authenticity. As discussed in social epistemology and media ethics for a while now, such strategies can lead to so-called epistemic or filter bubbles. Our analysis of the relation between boredom and social media use focuses on a similarly impairing effect of social media (...)
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  3. Power and Freedom in the Space of Reasons: Elaborating Foucault's Pragmatism.Tuomo Tiisala - 2024 - Routledge.
    This book argues that the received view of the distinction between freedom and power must be rejected because it rests on an untenable account of the discursive cognition that endows individuals with the capacity for autonomy, that is, self-governed rationality. In liberal and Kantian approaches alike, the autonomous subject is a self-standing starting-point, whose freedom is constrained by relations of power only contingently because they are external to the subject's constitution. Thus, the received view defines the distinction between freedom and (...)
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  4. The Good Life as the Life in Touch with the Good.Adam Lovett & Stefan Riedener - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies.
    What makes your life go well for you? In this paper, we give an account of welfare. Our core idea is simple. There are impersonally good and bad things out there: things that are good or bad period, not (or not only) good or bad for someone. The life that is good for you is the life in contact with the good. We’ll understand the relevant notion of ‘contact’ here in terms of manifestation: you’re in contact with a value either (...)
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  5. Immanuel Kant’s idea of radical evil as a systematic and terminological problem.Anna Szyrwińska-Hörig - 2023 - Ethic@ - An International Journal for Moral Philosophy 22 (2).
    The paper investigates the systematic connection between Kantian concept of radical evil and radical indeterministic idea of freedom. According to the presented thesis the systematically relevant interpretation of the radical evil concept requires considering not only philosophical ideas Kant`s but also the historic background in which they were formulated. Particularly the specific situation of German philosophic terminology in the 17th and early 18th Century will be acknowledged as one of the most significant factors influencing the development of the radical evil (...)
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  6. When are choices, actions, and consent based on adaptive preferences nonautonomous?Richard Pettigrew - manuscript
    Adaptive preferences give rise to puzzles in ethics, political philosophy, decision theory, and the theory of action. Like our other preferences, adaptive preferences lead us to make choices, take action, and give consent. In 'False Consciousness for Liberals', recently published in The Philosophical Review, David Enoch (2020) proposes a criterion by which to identify when these choices, actions, and acts of consent are less than fully autonomous; that is, when they suffer from what Natalie Stoljar (2014) calls an 'autonomy deficit'. (...)
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  7. Toward an Expressivist View of Women's Autonomy.Laura Martin - forthcoming - Ergo.
    Feminists debate whether women can autonomously embrace their own subordination. Some argue that it is the process of identifying with desires and values that matters; others, that it is the content of the desires and values that matters. In this paper, I introduce a novel class of cases of ‘thwarted autonomy,’ in which women pursue autonomy but in ways that reinforce gendered subordination, and draw on these cases to develop an expressivist view of women’s autonomy. On this view, agents must (...)
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  8. Value Capture.C. Thi Nguyen - forthcoming - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy.
    Value capture occurs when an agent’s values are rich and subtle; they enter a social environment that presents simplified — typically quantified — versions of those values; and those simplified articulations come to dominate their practical reasoning. Examples include becoming motivated by FitBit’s step counts, Twitter Likes and Re-tweets, citation rates, ranked lists of best schools, and Grade Point Averages. We are vulnerable to value capture because of the competitive advantage that such crisp and clear expressions of value have in (...)
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  9. The Rules of Rescue: Cost, Distance, and Effective Altruism, by Theron Pummer. [REVIEW]Daniel Muñoz - forthcoming - Mind.
  10. No Decolonization without Women’s Liberation: Women’s Liberation in the PAIGC’s Theoretical Discourse.Zeyad El Nabolsy - 2023 - Kohl: A Journal for Body and Gender Research 9 (1):141 - 155.
    [Attached PDF is the Arabic translation, the hyperlink takes you to the original English version] In this paper I argue that the emphasis, which was placed by the PAIGC’s leadership, and specifically by Amílcar Cabral, on the importance of advancing women’s rights and women’s liberation should be understood as being a consequence of Cabral’s modernist philosophical orientation. Moreover, I argue that women played an essential part in the struggle for liberation from Portuguese colonialism. In the first section, I characterize Cabral’s (...)
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  11. Ditching Decision-Making Capacity.Daniel Fogal & Ben Schwan - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Decision-making capacity (DMC) plays an important role in clinical practice—determining, on the basis of a patient’s decisional abilities, whether they are entitled to make their own medical decisions or whether a surrogate must be secured to participate in decisions on their behalf. As a result, it’s critical that we get things right—that our conceptual framework be well-suited to the task of helping practitioners systematically sort through the relevant ethical considerations in a way that reliably and transparently delivers correct verdicts about (...)
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  12. The Betrayal of Education: The Failure of Competence-Based Learning and the Demand for Bildung (manuscript under review at Bloomsbury).Luca Moretti & Alessia Marabini - manuscript
    Contents -/- Acknowledgments CHAPTER 1: Two conceptions of education 1.1 Competences and Bildung 1.2 PISA amid competences and Bildung 1.3 The plan; CHAPTER 2: Competence-based education 2.1 Introduction 2.2 A short history of competence 2.3 The concept of competence 2.4 Student self-directed learning 2.5 Competence-based education 2.6 Strengths and weaknesses of competence-based education 2.7 Conclusions; CHAPTER 3: Competence-based education and society 3.1 Introduction 3.2 OECD key competences and society 3.3 Communicative action, recognition and epistemic injustice 3.4 Undesirable effects of competence-based (...)
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  13. On the Need for Distinctive Christian Moral Psychologies: How Kant Can Figure into Christian Ethics Today.Jaeha Woo - 2023 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 28 (1):149-179.
    I show how those with Kantian habits of mind—those committed to maintaining certain kinds of universality in ethics—can still get involved in the project of securing the distinctiveness of Christian ethics by highlighting parts of his moral philosophy that are amenable to this project. I first describe the interaction among James Gustafson, Stanley Hauerwas, and Samuel Wells surrounding the issue of the distinctiveness of Christian ethics, to explain why Kant is generally understood as the opponent of this project in this (...)
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  14. The Unity of Marx's Concept of Alienated Labor.Pascal Brixel - forthcoming - Philosophical Review.
    Marx says of alienated labor that it does not "belong" to the worker, that it issues in a product that does not belong to her, and that it is unfulfilling, unfree, egoistically motivated, and inhuman. He seems to think, moreover, that the first of these features grounds all the others. All of these features seem quite independent, however: they can come apart; they share no obvious common cause or explanation; and if they often occur together this seems accidental. It is (...)
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  15. Accommodated authority: Broadening the picture.Laura Caponetto - 2022 - Analysis 82 (4):682-692.
    Speaker authority can spring into existence via accommodation mechanisms: a speaker acts as if they had authority and they can end up obtaining it if nobody objects. Versions of this claim have been advanced by Rae Langton, Ishani Maitra, Maciej Witek, and others. In this paper, I shift the focus from speaker to hearer authority. I develop a three-staged argument, according to which (i) felicity conditions for illocution can be recast in presupposition terms; (ii) just as certain illocutions require speaker (...)
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  16. Coercive Threats and Offers in Psychiatry.Thomas Schramme - 2003 - In Thomas Schramme & Johannes Thome (eds.), Philosophy and Psychiatry. De Gruyter. pp. 357-369.
    If a patient complies voluntarily with a certain proposal, we generally regard the treatment as legitimate. But a competent patient may also assent to a certain treatment only because he was compelled to do so. Influences on the formation of his decision may render his choice contrary to his will. It is my aim to focus on these particular forms of coercion which are often neglected in discussions of informed consent.
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  17. Trust, Mistrust, and Autonomy.Edward Hinchman & Andrea Westlund - 2023 - In Mark Alfano & David Collins (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Trust. Lexington Books. pp. 105-121.
    Is autonomy – governing yourself – compatible with letting yourself be governed by trust? This paper argues that autonomy is not only compatible with appropriate trust but actually requires it. Autonomy requires appropriate trust because it is undermined by inappropriate mistrust. An autonomous agent treats herself as answerable for her action-guiding commitments, where answerability requires openness to the rational influence of external, critical perspectives on those commitments. This openness to correction makes one vulnerable to manipulation and can be exploited in (...)
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  18. Disagreement and Free Speech.Sebastien Bishop & Robert Mark Simpson - forthcoming - In Maria Baghramian, Adam Carter & R. Rowland (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Disagreement. Routledge.
    This chapter examines two ways in which liberal thinkers have appealed to claims about disagreement in order to defend a principle of free speech. One argument, from Mill, says that free speech is a necessary condition for healthy disagreement, and that healthy disagreement is conducive to human flourishing. The other argument says that in a community of people who disagree about questions of value, free speech is a necessary condition of legitimate democratic government. We argue that both of these arguments, (...)
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  19. What is a subliminal technique? An ethical perspective on AI-driven influence.Juan Pablo Bermúdez, Rune Nyrup, Sebastian Deterding, Celine Mougenot, Laura Moradbakhti, Fangzhou You & Rafael A. Calvo - 2023 - Ieee Ethics-2023 Conference Proceedings.
    Concerns about threats to human autonomy feature prominently in the field of AI ethics. One aspect of this concern relates to the use of AI systems for problematically manipulative influence. In response to this, the European Union’s draft AI Act (AIA) includes a prohibition on AI systems deploying subliminal techniques that alter people’s behavior in ways that are reasonably likely to cause harm (Article 5(1)(a)). Critics have argued that the term ‘subliminal techniques’ is too narrow to capture the target cases (...)
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  20. Acquired Character.Sean T. Murphy - 2023 - In David Bather Woods & Timothy Stoll (eds.), The Schopenhauerian mind. New York, NY: Routledge.
  21. Identity-Relative Paternalism and Allowing Harm to Others.David Birks - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (6):411-412.
    Dominic Wilkinson’s defence of identity-relative paternalism raises many important issues that are well worth considering. In this short paper, I will argue that there could be two important differences between the first-party and third-party cases that Wilkinson discusses, namely, a difference in associative duties and how the decision relates to the decision maker’s own autonomous life. This could mean that identity-relative paternalism is impermissible in a greater number of cases than he suggests.
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  22. Freedom, Desire, and Necessity.Pascal Brixel - 2023 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 24 (3).
    I defend a necessary condition of local autonomy inspired by Aristotle and Marx. One does something autonomously, I argue, only if one does it for its own sake and not for the sake of further ends alone. I show that this idea steers an attractive middle path between the subjectivism of Dworkin- and Frankfurt-style theories of autonomy on the one hand and the objectivism of Raz-style theories on the other. By doing so, it vindicates and explains two important pieces of (...)
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  23. Political Perfectionism and the Moral Acceptability of Pure Paternalism.Adam D. Bailey - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):95-112.
    In this essay, I argue against an important position in contemporary perfectionist political philosophy, which holds both that the state is instrumental in nature and that there are principled, rather than merely prudential, limits on the scope of state authority such that pure paternalism is not morally acceptable. By so doing, I provide a conditional defense of the moral acceptability of pure paternalism.
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  24. The Forum.Margaret Urban Walker - 2002 - Ethics and Behavior 12 (3):279-293.
  25. Book Review: Crisis of Authority: Politics, Trust, and Truth-Telling in Freud and Foucault, by Nancy Luxon. [REVIEW]Renée Heberle - 2017 - Political Theory 45 (4):566-570.
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  26. Review of Kwame Anthony Appiah's Ethics of Identity. [REVIEW]Michael S. Merry - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (3):564-567.
    Appiah’s latest book does something distinctive: it shows why we need to take another look at very familiar dimensions of identity, those dimensions of our personhood that encompass cultural loyalties, moral responsibilities towards others, and the ethical life. Indeed, Appiah’s book is a kind of answer to an ancient Socratic question, that is, what sort of person one aims to be. The Ethics of Identity is an apt title, for the arguments contained within make the case that who we are (...)
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  27. Autonomy as an Ideal for Neuro-Atypical Agency: Lessons from Bipolar Disorder.Elliot Porter - 2023 - Dissertation, University of Kent
    There is a strong presumption that mental disorder injures a person's autonomy, understood as a set of capacities and as an ideal condition of agency which is worth striving for. However, recent multidimensional approaches to autonomy have revealed a greater diversity in ways of being autonomous than has previously been appreciated. This presumption, then, risks wrongly dismissing variant, neuro-atypical sorts of autonomy as non-autonomy. This is both an epistemic error, which impairs our understanding of autonomy as a phenomenon, and a (...)
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  28. Beyond adaptive preferences: Rethinking women's complicity in their own subordination.Charlotte Knowles - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 30 (4):1317–1334.
    An important question confronting feminist philosophers is why women are sometimes complicit in their own subordination. The dominant view holds that complicity is best understood in terms of adaptive preferences. This view assumes that agents will naturally gravitate away from subordination and towards flourishing as long as they do not have things imposed on them that disrupt this trajectory. However, there is reason to believe that ‘impositions’ do not explain all of the ways in which complicity can arise. This paper (...)
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  29. Autonomy and Dignity.Suzy Killmister - 2022 - In Ben Colburn (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Autonomy. New York, NY: Routledge.
    Like the ‘thoughts and prayers’ so commonly offered by politicians in the aftermath of disaster, it is incredibly common to hear ‘autonomy and dignity’ invoked together in response to some threat to human wellbeing. As such, it seems natural to assume they must bear some kind of relation to one another. But are they merely two core human interests, that happen to be vulnerable to the same kinds of threat? Or are they interrelated in a deeper way? What I aim (...)
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  30. Educational adequacy and educational equality: a merging proposal.Fernando De-Los-Santos-Menéndez - 2022 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 25 (6):787-808.
    A good education provides useful ‘knowledge, skills, attitudes, and dispositions’ (Brighouse, Ladd, Loeb, & Swift, 2016, p. 6).1 Educational justice cares about the distribution of these goods beca...
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  31. The Life of Form: Practical Reason in Kant and Hegel.Thomas Khurana - 2022 - In Ways of Being Bound: Perspectives from post-Kantian Philosophy and Relational Sociology. Cham: pp. 47-70.
    This chapter investigates the Kantian idea that a rational life is a life of “mere form”—a life in which a “mere form” is the force or spring of action. I start by developing Kant’s practical notion of life—the capacity to be the cause of what one represents. In a second step, I investigate the way in which Kant characterizes a rational life—the capacity to act in accordance with the representation of laws and to determine ourselves by the mere form of (...)
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  32. Lucas Swaine, Ethical Autonomy: The Rise of Self-Rule. [REVIEW]Adam Lovett - 2022 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 19 (5):543-546.
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  33. Autonomy of attention.Kaisa Kärki - 2022 - In Vincent C. Müller (ed.), Philosophy and Theory of Artificial Intelligence 2021. pp. 39-55.
    What precisely does a distraction threaten? An agent who spends an inordinate amount of time attending to her smartphone – what precisely is she lacking? I argue that whereas agency of attention is the agent’s non-automatic decision-making on what she currently pays attention to, autonomy of attention is the agent, through her second-order desires, effectively interfering with her non-automatic decision-making on what she currently pays attention to. Freedom of attention is the agent’s possibility to hold or switch her focus of (...)
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  34. Ghost-Written Lives: Autonomy, Deference, and Self-Authorship.Michael Garnett - 2022 - Ethics 133 (2):189–215.
    Certain forms of practical deference seem to be incompatible with personal autonomy. I argue that such deference undermines autonomy not by compromising the governance of an authentic self, nor by constituting a failure to track objective reasons, but by constituting a particular social relation: one of interpersonal rule. I analyse this social relation and distinguish it from others, including ordinary relations of love and care. Finally, I argue that the particular form of interpersonal rule constituted by dispositions of practical deference (...)
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  35. AI, Opacity, and Personal Autonomy.Bram Vaassen - 2022 - Philosophy and Technology 35 (4):1-20.
    Advancements in machine learning have fuelled the popularity of using AI decision algorithms in procedures such as bail hearings, medical diagnoses and recruitment. Academic articles, policy texts, and popularizing books alike warn that such algorithms tend to be opaque: they do not provide explanations for their outcomes. Building on a causal account of transparency and opacity as well as recent work on the value of causal explanation, I formulate a moral concern for opaque algorithms that is yet to receive a (...)
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  36. Introduction.Rachel Fedock, Michael Kühler & T. Raja Rosenhagen - 2020 - In Rachel Fedock, Michael Kühler & T. Raja Rosenhagen (eds.), Love, Justice, and Autonomy: Philosophical Perspectives. Routledge. pp. 1-20.
    This paper provides an introduction to the relevant debates revolving the three topics the connections between which are the being discussed in this volume--justice, autonomy, and love--outlining various conceptions and related questions. It also contains an overview of the contributions to the three sections of the volume: I) Justice Within Relationships of Love, II) Loving Partiality and Moral Impartiality, and III) The Political Dimension of Love and Justice.
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  37. Out of Step with the World.Getty L. Lustila & J. C. A. Olsthoorn - 2022 - In Joshua Heter & Richard Greene (eds.), Punk Rock and Philosophy: Research and Destroy. Carus Books. pp. 309-317.
    What are we to make of the cultural nonconformity of hardcore/punks? Is there any ethical value in the pursuit of cultural nonconformity? Distinct moral justifications can be teased from the lyrics of the hardcore/punk bands that we have grown up with and still love. The best explanation of what makes cultural nonconformity morally valuable, we believe, comes from John Stuart Mill: that it opens up new cultural space to oneself and to others, permitting "new and original experiments of living.".
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  38. Social and Political “Statutes of Limitations”: Mo' Approaches, Mo' Problems.Jennifer Kling & Colin J. Lewis - 2022 - In Court D. Lewis (ed.), Forgiveness Confronts Race, Relationships, and the Social. Wilmington, DE, USA: pp. 91-111.
    Recent events have directed public attention to the issue of whether there should be so-called “statutes of limitations” on oppressive transgressions committed in the past. We ask: in such cases, is sociopolitical forgiveness (or “forgetfulness”) owed to transgressors? We detail two moral-political narratives that might help address this issue: one constructed around the values and perspectives of justice, rights, and autonomy-based views (the JRA approach), and another oriented around the values and perspectives of care ethics, virtue ethics, and relationality, drawing (...)
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  39. The teacher-student relationship: An existential approach.Alison M. Brady - 2019 - Routledge.
    The teacher-student relationship, and how to define it, has often been an area of interest for educational researchers, perhaps because it seems to be so central to the very notion of education itself. Indeed, how might one conceive of the process of education without considering who it is that is being educated, and who it is that is educating? And yet, whilst there are various conceptions of what the role of the teacher is in relation to the student, there is (...)
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  40. Gender-Critical Feminism.Holly Lawford-Smith - 2022 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    The expectation used to be that men would be masculine and women would be feminine, and this was assumed to come naturally to them in virtue of their biology. That orthodoxy persists today in many parts of society. On this view, sex is gender and gender is sex. -/- A new view of gender has emerged in recent years, a view on which gender is an 'identity', a way that people feel about themselves in terms of masculinity or femininity, regardless (...)
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  41. Health, migration and human rights.Johannes Kniess - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 25 (7):920-938.
    Doctors, nurses and midwifes from developing countries migrate to affluent countries in large numbers, often leaving behind severely understaffed healthcare systems. One way to limit this ‘brain drain’ is to restrict the freedom of movement of healthcare workers. Yet this seems to give rise to a conflict of human rights: on the one hand rights to freedom of movement, on the other hand rights to health. By motivating its own account of human rights, this paper argues that the conflict is (...)
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  42. The Individualistic Roots of Virtue.Yvonne Chiu - 2022 - Journal of Social and Political Philosophy 1 (1):79-84.
    In *Against Political Equality: The Confucian Case*, BAI Tongdong says that his main target is democracy, but he focuses much of his critiques on liberalism, rejecting its foundational value of autonomy in favor of Confucian grounds for governance. Given the extent of his concurrence with liberalism, however, it would be more consistent with Bai’s stated aim (of tempering the democratic part and shoring up the liberal side of liberal democracy) to make common cause with liberalism against populism. Mencian compassion and (...)
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  43. A republican argument for the rule of law.Frank Lovett - 2023 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 26 (2):137-158.
    While the rule of law is surely a very important good, the familiar discussions found in the literature lead many to conclude that it is either a relatively trivial political ideal, or else a redundant one. What is needed is a new and persuasive defense of the rule of law that properly reflects its great significance for human well being. An important step towards building such an argument is to question a widely-shared but often unnoticed assumption that the rule of (...)
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  44. Sovereignty over natural resources.Ioannis Kouris - 2023 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 26 (2):204-227.
    Most people assume that the natural resources of a country belong to its people. Theorists of cosmopolitan resource justice have recently questioned this assumption, arguing that extensive rights of peoples over natural resources cannot be justified. In response, defences of peoples’ resource rights, grounded in the value of self-determination, have been tepid. This paper argues against both positions. It advances the distinct thesis that popular resource sovereignty is justified as the resource rights allocation that maximizes well-being. This consequentialist account provides (...)
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  45. The social bases of freedom.Harrison Frye - 2022 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 25 (7):963-979.
    I argue social and political freedom is not primarily about the absence of constraints, whether those constraints be in the form of interference or domination. Instead, social freedom is centrally about what makes us free. That is, the question of social freedom is first and foremost about determining the positive preconditions of being a free person within society. Social freedom is about what I call the social bases of freedom, or those features of our social world that we have a (...)
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  46. ‘This man is my property’: Slavery and political absolutism in Locke and the classical social contract tradition.Johan Olsthoorn & Laurens van Apeldoorn - 2020 - European Journal of Political Theory 21 (2):147488512091130.
    It is morally impossible, Locke argued, for individuals to consensually establish absolute rule over themselves. That would be to transfer to rulers a power that is not ours, but God’s alone: owner...
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  47. Political normativity and the functional autonomy of politics.Carlo Burelli - 2020 - European Journal of Political Theory 21 (4):147488512091850.
    This article argues for a new interpretation of the realist claim that politics is autonomous from morality and involves specific political values. First, this article defends an original normative...
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  48. Robot Autonomy vs. Human Autonomy: Social Robots, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and the Nature of Autonomy.Paul Formosa - 2021 - Minds and Machines 31 (4):595-616.
    Social robots are robots that can interact socially with humans. As social robots and the artificial intelligence that powers them becomes more advanced, they will likely take on more social and work roles. This has many important ethical implications. In this paper, we focus on one of the most central of these, the impacts that social robots can have on human autonomy. We argue that, due to their physical presence and social capacities, there is a strong potential for social robots (...)
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  49. The Value of Freedom.Jochen Bojanowski - 2021 - Proceedings of the XIII. International Kant Congress Oslo 12:431-438.
    Kant’s conception of autonomy has been criticised for identifying acting freely with acting morally. As a result, many Kantians have moved away from Kant’s moral conception of autonomy, instead proposing what I will call an “end-set- ting” or “two-way capacity” account of autonomy. I believe that we should resist these revisions and that doing so makes clear why it is only the capacity for moral autonomy that is of unlimited value. What fundamentally distinguishes our free capacity of volition is the (...)
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  50. On being good gay: ‘covering’ and the social structure of being LGBT+.Annamari Vitikainen - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (7):1083-1090.
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