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Jonathan A. Hughes
Keele University
  1.  25
    Conscientious Objection, Professional Duty and Compromise: A Response to Savulescu and Schuklenk.Jonathan A. Hughes - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (2):126-131.
    In a recent article in this journal, Savulescu and Schuklenk defend and extend their earlier arguments against a right to medical conscientious objection in response to criticisms raised by Cowley. I argue that while it would be preferable to be less accommodating of medical conscientious than many countries currently are, Savulescu and Schuklenk's argument that conscientious objection is ‘simply unprofessional’ is mistaken. The professional duties of doctors should be defined in relation to the interests of patients and society, and for (...)
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  2.  8
    Lockdown and Levelling Down: Why Savulescu and Cameron Are Mistaken About Selective Isolation of the Elderly.Jonathan A. Hughes - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (11):722-723.
    In their recent article, ‘Why lockdown of the elderly is not ageist and why levelling down equality is wrong’, Savulescu and Cameron argue for selective isolation of the elderly as an alternative to general lockdown. An important part of their argument is the claim that the latter amounts to ‘levelling down equality’ and that this is ‘unethical’ or even ‘morally repugnant’. This response argues that they fail to justify either part of this claim: the claim that levelling down is always (...)
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  3.  13
    Conscientious Objection in Healthcare: Why Tribunals Might Be the Answer.Jonathan A. Hughes - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (4):213-217.
    A recent focus of the debate on conscientious objection in healthcare is the question of whether practitioners should have to justify their refusal to perform certain functions. A recent article by Cowley addresses a practical aspect of this controversy, namely the question of whether doctors claiming conscientious objector status in relation to abortion should be required, like their counterparts claiming exemption from military conscription, to defend their claim before a tribunal. Cowley argues against the use of tribunals in the medical (...)
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  4.  11
    Does the Heterogeneity of Autism Undermine the Neurodiversity Paradigm?Jonathan A. Hughes - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):47-60.
    The neurodiversity paradigm is presented by its proponents as providing a philosophical foundation for the activism of the neurodiversity movement. Its central claims are that autism and other neurodivergent conditions are not disorders because they are not intrinsically harmful, and that they are valuable, natural and/or normal parts of human neurocognitive variation. This paper: (a) identifies the non‐disorder claim as the most central of these, based on its prominence in the literature and connections with the practical policy claims that the (...)
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  5.  11
    Advance Euthanasia Directives and the Dutch Prosecution.Jonathan A. Hughes - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (4):253-256.
    In a recent Dutch euthanasia case, a woman underwent euthanasia on the basis of an advance directive, having first been sedated without her knowledge and then restrained by members of her family while the euthanasia was administered. This article considers some implications of the criminal court’s acquittal of the doctor who performed the euthanasia. Supporters of advance euthanasia directives have welcomed the judgement as providing a clarification of the law, especially with regard to the admissibility of contextual evidence in interpreting (...)
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  6. Time and Crime: Which Cold-Case Investigations Should Be Reheated.Jonathan A. Hughes & Monique Jonas - 2015 - Criminal Justice Ethics 34 (1):18-41.
    Advances in forensic techniques have expanded the temporal horizon of criminal investigations, facilitating investigation of historic crimes that would previously have been considered unsolvable. Public enthusiasm for pursuing historic crimes is exemplified by recent high-profile trials of celebrities accused of historic sexual offences. These circumstances give new urgency to the question of how we should decide which historic offences to investigate. A satisfactory answer must take into account the ways in which the passage of time can erode the benefits of (...)
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  7.  5
    Weighing Ethical Considerations in Proposed Non-Recent Child Sexual Abuse Investigations: A Response to Maslen and Paine’s Oxford CSA Framework.Jonathan A. Hughes & Monique Jonas - 2020 - Criminal Justice Ethics 39 (2):95-110.
    Questions about when it is right for police forces to investigate alleged offences committed in the more or less distant past have become increasingly pressing. Recent widely publicized cases of child sexual abuse (CSA) and exploitation, sometimes involving high profile individuals, have illustrated the ethical, psychological, and forensic complexities of investigating non-recent child sexual abuse. Hannah Maslen and Colin Paine have developed the Oxford CSA Framework to assist police to weigh the various ethical considerations that militate for and against initiating (...)
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