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1448 found
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  1. The Limits of Individuality: Ritual and Sacrifice in the Lives and Medical Treatment of Conjoined Twins.D. A. - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 29 (1):1-29.
  2. Mercy, Murder, and Morality.J. G. M. Aartsen, P. V. Admiraal, Id Debeaufort, Tmg Vanberkestijn, Jbv Waalkes, E. Borsteilers, Wh Cense, Hs Cohen, Hm Dupuis & W. Everaerd - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (6):47-48.
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  3. The Case of Debbie Revisited: A Literary Perspective. [REVIEW]Craig S. Abbott - 1989 - Journal of Medical Humanities 10 (2):99-106.
    The publication in theJournal of the American Medical Association of a narrative entitled “It's Over, Debbie,” in which a gynecology resident apparently performs euthanasia, has stirred considerable debate characterized by varying interpretations not only of the ethical issues involved but of the meaning of the text itself. Formal analysis reveals the narrative to be strikingly literary in its ambiguity, its foregrounding of its own textuality, and its dominant structure of repetition and reversal. The analysis points to features that account for (...)
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  4. Disclosure of Terminal Illness to Patients and Families: Diversity of Governing Codes in 14 Islamic Countries.H. E. Abdulhameed, M. M. Hammami & E. A. Hameed Mohamed - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):472-475.
    Background The consistency of codes governing disclosure of terminal illness to patients and families in Islamic countries has not been studied until now. Objectives To review available codes on disclosure of terminal illness in Islamic countries. Data source and extraction Data were extracted through searches on Google and PubMed. Codes related to disclosure of terminal illness to patients or families were abstracted, and then classified independently by the three authors. Data synthesis Codes for 14 Islamic countries were located. Five codes (...)
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  5. The Consequences of “Terminal Rescue”.Virginia Abernethy - 1983 - Hastings Center Report 13 (1):36-36.
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  6. Active and Passive Euthanasia.Natalie Abrams - 1978 - Philosophy 53 (204):257 - 263.
    This paper is divided into three sections. The first presents some examples of the killing/letting die distinction. The second draws a further distinction between what I call negative and positive cases of acting or refraining. Here I argue that the moral significance of the acting/refraining distinction is different for positive and for negative cases. In the third section I apply the above distinction to euthanasia, and argue that mercy killing should be regarded as analogous to positive rather than negative cases. (...)
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  7. Is There a Place for Euthanasia.P. Admiraal - 1991 - Bioethics News 10 (4):10-23.
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  8. Euthanasia in The Netherlands.Pieter Admiraal - 1996 - Free Inquiry 17.
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  9. Justifiable Active Euthanasia in the Netherlands.Pieter Admiraal - 1989 - In Robert M. Baird & Stuart E. Rosenbaum (eds.), Euthanasia: The Moral Issues. Prometheus Books. pp. 125--28.
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  10. Attitudes Towards Euthanasia in Iran: The Role of Altruism.N. Aghababaei - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):173-176.
    Objective Altruism is arguably the quintessential moral trait, involving willingness to benefit others and unwillingness to harm them. In this study, I explored how altruism and other personality variables relate to acceptance of euthanasia. In addition, I investigated the role of culture in attitudes to subcategorical distinctions of euthanasia.Methods 190 Iranian students completed the Attitude Towards Euthanasia scale, the HEXACO Personality Inventory-Revised, and an interest in religion measure.Results Higher scores on altruism, Honesty–Humility, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness and religiousness were associated with viewing (...)
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  11. Cultural Explanations and Clinical Ethics: Active Euthanasia in Neonatology.A. Ahmad - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):192-192.
    The authors have undertaken a study to explore the views in non-Western cultures about ending the lives of newborns with genetic defects. This study consists of including active euthanasia alongside withdrawal and withholding of treatment as potential methods used.Apart from radicalising the support for active euthanasia in certain instances of neonatal diagnoses, is another interesting point that views of children and death are shaped by religion and culture and are especially highly charged with culturally specific symbolism/s. Furthermore, this is augmented (...)
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  12. The Selection Criteria for High-Ranking Civil Servants in the Southern Netherlands (1700-1725).Flore Alix - 2009 - Revue Belge de Philologie Et D’Histoire 87 (2):297-347.
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  13. The Case Against Assisted Suicide: For the Right to End-of-Life Care Edited by Kathleen Foley and Herbert Hendin and The Future of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia by Neil M. Gorsuch.Michael E. Allsopp - 2010 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10 (4):813-817.
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  14. A Merciful End: The Euthanasia Movement in Modern America, by Ian Dowbiggin.Michael E. Allsopp - 2007 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 7 (3):627-630.
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  15. Why Killing is Not Always Worse–and Sometimes Better–Than Letting Die.H. Also Kuhse - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:371-4.
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  16. Islamic Views on Artificial Nutrition and Hydration in Terminally Ill Patients.Sami Alsolamy - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (2):96-99.
    Withholding and withdrawing artificial nutrition and hydration from terminally ill patients poses many ethical challenges. The literature provides little information about the Islamic beliefs, attitudes, and laws related to these challenges. Artificial nutrition and hydration may be futile and reduce quality of life. They can also harm the terminally ill patient because of complications such as aspiration pneumonia, dyspnea, nausea, diarrhea, and hypervolemia. From the perspective of Islam, rules governing the care of terminally ill patients are derived from the principle (...)
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  17. Volume 22 Issue 3 - 'Apres Moi Le Deluge'.Zac Alstin - 2012 - Bioethics Research Notes 22 (3):42-.
    Alstin, Zac The increasing support that euthanasia is gathering in South Australia with a new euthanasia bill about to be passed is discussed. Some of the implicit and explicit challenges and pressures that the introduction of such a bill will pose are highlighted.
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  18. Apres Moi Le Deluge.Zac Alstin - 2010 - Bioethics Research Notes 22 (3):42.
    Alstin, Zac The increasing support that euthanasia is gathering in South Australia with a new euthanasia bill about to be passed is discussed. Some of the implicit and explicit challenges and pressures that the introduction of such a bill will pose are highlighted.
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  19. The Inherent Instability of Euthanasia.Zac Alstin - 2010 - Bioethics Research Notes 22 (2):15.
    Alstin, Zac Euthanasia, which is defined as the intentional killing of another human being, is compared with the established categories of killing in self-defence or as a foreseeable consequence of medical treatment.
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  20. Was Ist Das Problematische an der Palliativen Sedierung? – Eine ÜbersichtWhat is Problematic with Palliative Sedation?: A Review.Bernd Alt-Epping, Friedemann Nauck & Birgit Jaspers - 2015 - Ethik in der Medizin 27 (3):219-231.
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  21. Euthanasia: The Good Death.A. T. Altschul - 1990 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (4):218-218.
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  22. Bayrak, I., Analgesia and Euthanasia of Animals in Research.T. Altug & C. Karaca - forthcoming - Bioethics Congress.
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  23. Moving From Voluntary Euthanasia to Non-Voluntary Euthanasia: Equality and Compassion.Kumar Amarasekara & Mirko Bagaric - 2004 - Ratio Juris 17 (3):398-423.
  24. Suffering and the Sovereignty of God: One Evangelical's Perspective on Doctor-Assisted Suicide.D. W. Amundsen - 1995 - Christian Bioethics 1 (3):285-313.
    This paper presents my personal convictions, as an Evangelical, regarding the absolute impropriety of doctor-assisted suicide for Christians. They have been “bought with a price” and are owned by Another. Hence, they must always strive to glorify God in their bodies, both in life and in death. Although they crave the well-being of temporal health, when they are ill seek healing or relief, and may well recoil even from the thought of suffering and dying, they should realize that their values (...)
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  25. Prenatal Sex and Race Determination is a Slippery Slope.M. Andreae - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (4):376-376.
    I am deeply worried about your guest editorial,1 please allow me a few bullet points: Trying to dispel some of the counterarguments to sex selection, your argument of prospective parents’ autonomy is void. If anyone has a right to determine his or her sex, it would be the person concerned, in this case the unborn child. ….
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  26. Voluntary Euthanasia Shows Compassion for the Dying.Marcia Angell - 2000 - In James D. Torr (ed.), Euthanasia: Opposing Viewpoints. Greenhaven Press. pp. 46--54.
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  27. The Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Tube : Medical and Ethical Issues in Placement.Floyd Angus & Robert Burakoff - 2006 - In Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life. Prometheus Books.
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  28. Nancy Cruzan in China.George J. Annas - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (5):39-41.
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  29. At Law: Nancy Cruzan in China.George J. Annas - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (5):39.
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  30. Cruzan, Nancy in China.Gj Annas - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (5):39-41.
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  31. Terminal Sedation: Ethically Problematic or Justifiable?Reiner Anselm - 2004 - Ethik in der Medizin 16:342-348.
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  32. Euthanasia, Philosophy, and the Law: A Jurist's View From Madrid.Francisco Javier Ansuátegui Roig - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (3):262.
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  33. Palliative Care Registers: Infringement on Human Rights?R. Anthony-Pillai - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (4):256-256.
    A personal view made in light of the recent news article regarding a husband wanting to sue Addenbrooke's hospital over a Do Not Attempt Resuscitation decision. This article aims to highlight how the rolling out of cross boundary palliative care registers may be more at risk of infringing human rights.
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  34. Neonatal Euthanasia: Why Require Parental Consent? [REVIEW]Jacob M. Appel - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):477-482.
    The Dutch rules governing neonatal euthanasia, known as the Groningen Protocol, require parental consent for severely disabled infants with poor prognoses to have their lives terminated. This paper questions whether parental consent should be dispositive in such cases, and argues that the potential suffering of the neonate or pediatric patient should be the decisive factor under such unfortunate circumstances.
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  35. An Islamic Perspective on Euthanasia.Kiarash Aramesh & Heydar Shadi - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):65-66.
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  36. An Ethical Perspective on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide in the Netherlands From a Nursing Point of View.A. J. V. D. Arend - 1998 - Nursing Ethics 5 (4):307-318.
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  37. Scott Bukatman, Terminal Identity.J. Armitage - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  38. Life, Death and Decisions: Doctors and Nurses Reflect on Neonatal Practice.M. Arndt - 1998 - Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (2):135-136.
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  39. Atthe Risk of Oversimplifying, Let Us Assume as a Working Premise That There Are Basically Two Types of People: Active and Passive. This.Human Beings as Technological - 2006 - In John R. Dakers (ed.), Defining Technological Literacy: Towards an Epistemological Framework. Palgrave-Macmillan.
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  40. Doctors' and Nurses' Attitudes Towards and Experiences of Voluntary Euthanasia: Survey of Members of the Japanese Association of Palliative Medicine.Atsushi Asai, Motoki Ohnishi, Shizuko K. Nagata, Noritoshi Tanida & Yasuji Yamazaki - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):324-330.
    Objective—To demonstrate Japanese doctors' and nurses' attitudes towards and practices of voluntary euthanasia (VE) and to compare their attitudes and practices in this regard. Design—Postal survey, conducted between October and December 1999, using a self-administered questionnaire.Participants—All doctor members and nurse members of the Japanese Association of Palliative Medicine.Main outcome measure—Doctors' and nurses' attitude towards and practices of VE.Results—We received 366 completed questionnaires from 642 doctors surveyed (response rate, 58%) and 145 from 217 nurses surveyed (68%). A total of 54% (95% (...)
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  41. Death's Dominion: An Appreciation of Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013). [REVIEW]Michael A. Ashby - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):283-285.
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  42. The Moral Distinction Between Killing and Letting Die in Medical Cases.Joachim Asscher - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (5):278–285.
    In some medical cases there is a moral distinction between killing and letting die, but in others there is not. In this paper I present an original and principled account of the moral distinction between killing and letting die. The account provides both an explanation of the moral distinction and an explanation for why the distinction does not always hold. If these explanations are correct, the moral distinction between killing and letting die must be taken seriously in medical contexts. Defeasibly, (...)
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  43. Killing and Letting Die: The Similarity Criterion.Joachim Asscher - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (3):271–282.
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  44. On Euthanasia: Exploring Psychological Meaning and Attitudes in a Sample of Mexican Physicians and Medical Students.Ma Luisa MarvÁn AsunciÓn Álvarez Del RÍo - 2011 - Developing World Bioethics 11 (3):146-153.
    ABSTRACTEuthanasia has become the subject of ethical and political debate in many countries including Mexico. Since many physicians are deeply concerned about euthanasia, due to their crucial participation in its decision and implementation, it is important to know the psychological meaning that the term ‘euthanasia’ has for them, as well as their attitudes toward this practice. This study explores psychological meaning and attitudes toward euthanasia in 546 Mexican subjects, either medical students or physicians, who were divided into three groups: a) (...)
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  45. Ambiguities in 'Killing' and 'Letting Die'.Gary M. Atkinson - 1983 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (2):159-168.
    In a recent Article Carla Kary attempts to show that there should be a significant moral difference between instances of killing and letting die. I shall maintain in Section I that Kary's argument is somewhat weakened by the failure to note an important ambiguity in the notion of killing a person. I shall also argue in Section II that a similar ambiguity affects the notion of letting someone die, and that the failure to note this latter ambiguity also weakens the (...)
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  46. Global Dialectics of Narrative Identity: Mediating the Voluntary and the Involuntary.Cynthia Anamaya Atsina - 2002 - Dissertation, University of San Francisco
    Philosophical anthropology and critical interpretive theory provide the context for this inquiry exploring aspects of self and modes of being-in-the-world. Building on the work of Paul Ricoeur and Martin Heidegger, the investigation provides insight into: an understanding of how the voluntary and the involuntary influence and shape the narrative identity of self with self and of self in relation with other---addressing the question, Who is it that we are?; an understanding of how the voluntary and the involuntary are reflected in (...)
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  47. Amantes Sunt Amentes: Pathologizing Love and the Meaning of Suffering.Diana Aurenque & Christopher W. McDougall - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):34-36.
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  48. The Terminal: A Tale of Virtue.Wendy Austin - 2007 - Nursing Ethics 14 (1):54-61.
    The movie, The terminal, is used to illustrate Mac Intyre's description of virtue ethics. The terminal is a mythical tale about a traveler, Viktor Navorski, who is stranded by circumstances in a New York airport. Viktor is a person who, without a strict reliance on duty or rules, has developed the disposition to act well despite variation in his circumstances. His character is revealed in contrast to that of three other characters: a cleaner, a flight attendant and the airport manager. (...)
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  49. Euthanasia: Some Critical Remarks.Adejumobi Ayodele - 2009 - Etica E Politica 11 (1):441-454.
    Euthanasia is generally regarded as killing in order to put an end to the unrelieved pain and suffering of a patient. Most terminal diseases are often associated with unrelieved pain and suffering, as a result advocates of euthanasia have argued for the legalization of euthanasia on the ground of compassion for the patients’ suffering. However advancement in medicine has made it possible for modern medicine to reduce pain and suffering to the barest minimum. The questions that arise from this are, (...)
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  50. Moral Permissibility of Euthanasia: A Case Discussion From Bangladesh.Azam Golam/Golam Azam - 2006 - The Dhaka University Studies 63 (2):157-169.
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