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1460 found
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  1. added 2020-05-19
    A Kantian View of Suicide and End‐of‐Life Treatment.Martin Gunderson - 2004 - Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):277-287.
  2. added 2020-02-11
    Suicide and Euthanasia: Historical and Contemporary Themes.Melvin J. Brandon - 1992 - Ethics 102 (2):412-414.
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  3. added 2020-02-11
    The End of Life: Euthanasia and Morality.Bonnie Steinbock - 1987 - Ethics 97 (4):878-879.
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  4. added 2020-02-06
    Fighting for Dear Life: Christians and Aggressive End-of-Life Care.Myrick C. Shinall - 2014 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 57 (3):329-340.
    I propose that we think of martyrdom as a “discourse,” as a practice of dying for God and of talking about it.... For the “Romans,” it didn’t matter much whether the lions were eating a robber or a bishop, and it probably didn’t make much of a difference to the lions, either, but the robber’s friends and the bishop’s friends told different stories about those leonine meals. It is in these stories that martyrdom, as opposed to execution or dinner, can (...)
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  5. added 2020-01-15
    The Case for an Autonomy-Centered View of Physician-Assisted Death.Jeremy Davis & Eric Mathison - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    Most people who defend physician-assisted death (PAD) endorse the Joint View, which holds that two conditions—autonomy and welfare—must be satisfied for PAD to be justified. In this paper, we defend an Autonomy Only view. We argue that the welfare condition is either otiose on the most plausible account of the autonomy condition, or else is implausibly restrictive, particularly once we account for the broad range of reasons patients cite for desiring PAD, such as “tired of life” cases. Moreover, many of (...)
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  6. added 2020-01-13
    The Right to Life, Voluntary Euthanasia, and Termination of Life on Request.Elias Moser - 2017 - Philosophy Study 7 (8):445-454.
    In this article, the logical implications of a right to life are examined. It is first argued that the prohibition of Termination of life on request confers an inalienable right to life. A right is inalienable if it cannot legitimately be waived or transferred. Since voluntary euthanasia entails waiver of the right to life, the inalienability yields that it cannot be justified. Therefore, any ethical position that is in favor of voluntary euthanasia has to argue that the right to life (...)
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  7. added 2020-01-10
    Palliative Opioid Use, Palliative Sedation and Euthanasia: Reaffirming the Distinction.Guy Schofield, Idris Baker, Rachel Bullock, Hannah Clare, Paul Clark, Derek Willis, Craig Gannon & Rob George - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):48-50.
    We read with interest the extended essay published from Riisfeldt and are encouraged by an empirical ethics article which attempts to ground theory and its claims in the real world. However, such attempts also have real-world consequences. We are concerned to read the paper’s conclusion that clinical evidence weakens the distinction between euthanasia and normal palliative care prescribing. This is important. Globally, the most significant barrier to adequate symptom control in people with life-limiting illness is poor access to opioid analgesia. (...)
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  8. added 2020-01-06
    Questions of Life and Death.Onora O'Neill - 2008 - The Lancet 372:1291-1292.
    In Easeful Death: Is There a Case for Assisted Dying? Mary and Elisabeth Macdonald set out with exemplary clarity reasons for prohibiting or permitting physicians to “help” patients to die. Their arguments are cogent, illuminating, and in many ways convincing. Yet I find myself disagreeing with their conclusion that assisted dying should be made lawful, and will set out why.
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  9. added 2019-12-17
    Euthanasia, Or Death Assisted to its Dignity.István Király V. - 2019 - Saarbrucken: Lambert Academic Publishing.
    The book attempts to conceptualize the “ancient” issues of human death and human mortality in connection to the timely and vital subject of euthanasia. This subject forces the meditation to actually consider those ideological, ethical, deontological, legal, and metaphysical frameworks which guide from the very beginning any kind of approach to this question. This conception – in dialogue with Heideggerian fundamental ontology and existential analytics – reveals that, on the one hand, the concepts and ethics of death are originally determined (...)
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  10. added 2019-11-09
    Consent and the Criminal Law.Lucinda Vandervort - 1990 - Osgoode Hall Law Journal 28 (2):485-500.
    The author examines two proposals to expand legal recognition of individual control over physical integrity. Protections for individual autonomy are discussed in relation to the right to die, euthanasia, medical treatment, and consensual and assaultive sexual behaviours. The author argues that at present, the legal doctrine of consent protects only those individual preferences which are seen to be congruent with dominant societal values; social preferences and convenience override all other individual choices. Under these conditions, more freedom to waive rights of (...)
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  11. added 2019-10-21
    Should Aggregate Patient Preference Data Be Used to Make Decisions on Behalf of Unrepresented Patients?Nathaniel Sharadin - 2019 - AMA Journal of Ethics 21 (7):566-574.
    Patient preference predictors aim to solve the moral problem of making treatment decisions on behalf of incapacitated patients. This commentary on a case of an unrepresented patient at the end of life considers 3 related problems of such predictors: the problem of restricting the scope of inputs to the models (the “scope” problem), the problem of weighing inputs against one another (the “weight” problem), and the problem of multiple reasonable solutions to the scope and weight problems (the “multiple reasonable models” (...)
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  12. added 2019-10-10
    Against Recategorizing Physician-Assisted Suicide.Philip Reed - forthcoming - Public Affairs Quarterly.
    There is a growing trend among some physicians, psychiatrists, bioethicists, and other mental health professionals not to treat physician-assisted suicide (PAS) as suicide. The grounds for doing so are that PAS fundamentally differs from other suicides. Perhaps most notably, in 2017 the American Association of Suicidology argued that PAS is distinct from the behavior that their organization seeks to prevent. This paper compares and contrasts suicide and PAS in order to see how much overlap there is. Contrary to the emerging (...)
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  13. added 2019-10-01
    Commentary on" Suicide, Euthanasia, and the Psychiatrist".Michael J. Kelleher - 1998 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (2):145-149.
  14. added 2019-09-30
    Deep Uncertainties in the Criteria for Physician Aid-in-Dying for Psychiatric Patients.Piotr Grzegorz Nowak & Tomasz Żuradzki - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):54-56.
    In their insightful article, Brent Kious and Margaret Battin (2019) correctly identify an inconsistency between an involuntary psychiatric commitment for suicide prevention and physician aid in dying (PAD). They declare that it may be possible to resolve the problem by articulating “objective standards for evaluating the severity of others’ suffering,” but ultimately they admit that this task is beyond the scope of their article since the solution depends on “a deep and difficult” question about comparing the worseness of two possible (...)
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  15. added 2019-08-30
    Is the Exclusion of Psychiatric Patients From Access to Physician-Assisted Suicide Discriminatory?Joshua James Hatherley - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (12):817-820.
    Advocates of physician-assisted suicide often argue that, although the provision of PAS is morally permissible for persons with terminal, somatic illnesses, it is impermissible for patients suffering from psychiatric conditions. This claim is justified on the basis that psychiatric illnesses have certain morally relevant characteristics and/or implications that distinguish them from their somatic counterparts. In this paper, I address three arguments of this sort. First, that psychiatric conditions compromise a person’s decision-making capacity. Second, that we cannot have sufficient certainty that (...)
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  16. added 2019-06-14
    If Food and Water Are Proportionate Means, Why Not Oxygen?John Skalko - 2013 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 13 (3):453-468.
    Providing food and water, even by tube, is in principle an ordinary and proportionate means of preserving life. The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith made that clear in its August 1, 2007 statement on the matter. However, a pressing question remains: What about oxygen? Food and water are necessary for life. Is not oxygen equally necessary? So why did the CDF not also declare the use of a mechanical ventilator to be in principle an ordinary and proportionate means (...)
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  17. added 2019-06-07
    Die Sterbehilfedebatte und das Bild der Palliativmedizin in deutschen Printmedien.Marie-Christin Hahnen, Tania Pastrana, Stephanie Stiel, Arnd May, Dominik Groß & Lukas Radbruch - 2009 - Ethik in der Medizin 21 (4):289-305.
    ZusammenfassungDie Diskussionen um Sterbehilfe und Patientenverfügung sowie der Ruf nach einer Stärkung der Palliativmedizin nehmen viel Platz in der deutschen Presselandschaft ein. Da Zeitungen einerseits Meinungen und Wissen der Bevölkerung abbilden, andererseits auch zu deren Meinungsbildung und Information beitragen, wurde eine Analyse der Darstellung der Sterbehilfedebatte und der Palliativmedizin durchgeführt. Als empirisches Material dienten 433 Artikel aus den Jahren 2006 und 2007, die mithilfe einer Suche nach den Schlagworten „Palliativmedizin“, „Hospiz“, „Sterbebegleitung“, „Patientenverfügung“, „Patientenautonomie“ und „Sterbehilfe“ in den Print-Archiven verschiedener deutscher (...)
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  18. added 2019-06-06
    Death or Disability?: The 'Carmentis Machine' and Decision-Making for Critically Ill Children.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Death and grief in the ancient world -- Predictions and disability in Rome.
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  19. added 2019-06-06
    Egg Cell Preservation and the Right to Die in The Netherlands: Citizens’ Choices and the Limits of Medicine.Dorothea P. Touwen - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (3):449-457.
    It is a funny thing with the Dutch. On one hand, they seem preoccupied with death and adamant that patients be allowed to decide for themselves in what way they want to die. On the other, contrary to popular belief, the Dutch physician is allotted a very influential role in treatment decisions, far more prominent than in many other Western countries. From an American perspective Dutch professional ethics may seem quite paternalistic: a patient’s freedom to decide to have a particular (...)
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  20. added 2019-06-06
    Content Analysis of Euthanasia Policies of Nursing Homes in Flanders.Joke Lemiengre, Bernadette Dierckx de Casterlé, Yvonne Denier, Paul Schotsmans & Chris Gastmans - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (3):313-322.
    Objectives To describe the form and content of ethics policies on euthanasia in Flemish nursing homes and to determine the possible influence of religious affiliation on policy content. Methods Content analysis of euthanasia policy documents. Results Of the 737 nursing homes we contacted, 612 (83%) completed and returned the questionnaire. Of 92 (15%) nursing homes that reported to have a euthanasia policy, 85 (92%) provided a copy of their policy. Nursing homes applied the euthanasia law with additional palliative procedures and (...)
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  21. added 2019-06-06
    Dealing with Requests for Euthanasia: A Qualitative Study Investigating the Experience of General Practitioners.J.-J. Georges, A. M. The, B. D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen & G. van Der Wal - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):150-155.
    Background: Caring for terminally ill patients is a meaningful task, however the patient’s suffering can be a considerable burden and cause of frustration.Objectives: The aim of this study is to describe the experiences of general practitioners in The Netherlands in dealing with a request for euthanasia from a terminally ill patient.Methods: The data, collected through in-depth interviews, were analysed according to the constant comparative method.Results: Having to face a request for euthanasia when attempting to relieve a patient’s suffering was described (...)
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  22. added 2019-06-06
    Nurses’ Views on Their Involvement in Euthanasia: A Qualitative Study in Flanders.B. Dierckx De Casterle, C. Verpoort, Nele De Bal & Chris Gastmans - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (4):187-192.
    Background: Although nurses worldwide are confronted with euthanasia requests from patients, the views of palliative care nurses on their involvement in euthanasia remain unclear.Objectives: In depth exploration of the views of palliative care nurses on their involvement in the entire care process surrounding euthanasia.Design: A qualitative Grounded Theory strategy was used.Setting and participants: In anticipation of new Belgian legislation on euthanasia, we conducted semistructured interviews with 12 nurses working in a palliative care setting in the province of Vlaams-Brabant.Results: Palliative care (...)
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  23. added 2019-06-06
    Euthanasia in Europe: A Critique of the Marty Report.G. Widdershoven - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (1):34-35.
    Keown’s critique of the Marty report is as flawed as the report it criticisesIn 2003, a report by the Council of Europe’s social, health and family affairs committee appeared, questioning the council’s opposition to the legislation of euthanasia. This report is known as the Marty report. The report contains several arguments in favour of legalisation of euthanasia. The first argument focuses on the gap between practice and law. Legalisation would bring existing practices of euthanasia out of the grey area, and (...)
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  24. added 2019-06-06
    Causation, Intention, and Active Euthanasia.Alister Browne - 2006 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (1):71-80.
    Mr. Paul Mills suffered from cancer of the esophagus. Three major surgeries were unsuccessful in correcting the problem, and other treatment methods likewise failed. His condition deteriorated to the point where there was no longer any hope of recovery. Dr. Morrison, who was Mr. Mills's intensive care physician at the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre in Halifax, and Mr. Mills's family agreed that active life support should be discontinued. Dr. Morrison then removed Mr. Mills's ventilator. To everyone's surprise, and (...)
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  25. added 2019-06-06
    Going Against the Stream: Ethical Aspects of Ageing and Care: P Jeffery. Gracewing, 2001, 14.99 (Pb), Pp Xxi + 282. ISBN 0 85244 541. [REVIEW]J. C. Hughes - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (4):e15-e15.
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  26. added 2019-06-06
    Voluntary Euthanasia and the Common Law: M Otlowski. Oxford University Press, 2000, Pound25, Pp 564. ISBN 0-19-829868-. [REVIEW]J. Miola - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (4):277-278.
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  27. added 2019-06-06
    Death and Compassion: A Virtue-Based Approach to Euthanasia: L van Zyl. Ashgate, 2000, Pound40.00 (Hb), Pp 230. ISBN 0-7546-1231-. [REVIEW]R. Huxtable - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (4):278-278.
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  28. added 2019-06-06
    On Dying Well: An Anglican Contribution to the Debate on Euthanasia: Board for Social Responsibility of the Church of England, Church House Publishing, 2000, Pound4.95, 94 Pages, 0 7151 6587. [REVIEW]L. Campbell - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (3):209-209.
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  29. added 2019-06-06
    Drug Use in Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: Edited by Margaret P Battin and Arthur G Lipman, New York, Pharmaceutical Products Press, 1996, 360 Pages, US$36.00. [REVIEW]Rebecca Bennett - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):222-223.
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  30. added 2019-06-06
    Can the Abortion & Euthanasia Debates Really Be Brought to Peaceful Closure? Assessing the Position of Ronald DworkinLife's Dominion: An Argument About Abortion, Euthanasia & Individual Freedom.Richard J. Westley & Ronald Dworkin - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (4):899.
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  31. added 2019-06-06
    Cq Interview With Heleen M. Dupuis: Actively Ending The Life Of A Severely Handicapped Newborn: A Dutch Ethicist's Perspective.Heleen M. Dupuis - 1993 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (3):275-280.
    CQ: The Baby Bas Ross case stirred much public debate in The Netherlands since 1988 -a newborn infant with Down's syndrome whose parents refused to consent to a surgery that would have repaired an otherwise fatal congenital anomaly. Can you share your thoughts with us on this case?HD: I was the first ethicist to comment on this case because I was a friend of Dr. Molenaar, who was the final surgical decision maker for Baby Bas. A physician and I supported (...)
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  32. added 2019-06-06
    The Burgundian Netherlands. Walter Prevenier, Wim Blockmans, Peter King, Yvette Mead, Richard Vaughan.Richard Unger - 1988 - Speculum 63 (2):458-459.
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  33. added 2019-06-06
    Killing and Letting Die: What is the Moral Difference?Joseph L. Lombardi - 1980 - New Scholasticism 54 (2):200-212.
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  34. added 2019-06-06
    On Killing and Letting Die.Joseph M. Boyle Jr - 1977 - New Scholasticism 51 (4):433-452.
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  35. added 2019-06-05
    Qualified to Speak: Rush Rhees on the Subject of Euthanasia: Kevin Fitzpatrick.Kevin Fitzpatrick - 2013 - Philosophy 88 (4):575-592.
    The latest attempt by a determined, well-resourced lobby to introduce a law to permit assisted suicide/euthanasia in the UK was announced 15 May 2013 in the House of Lords. There are many dangerous facets to their arguments, not least of which is the rôle they cast for doctors in this debate. Rush Rhees' remarks on the topic display a depth that is lacking in the current debate in the public square, which needs to be lifted from its current low level. (...)
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  36. added 2019-06-05
    Response: A Defence of a New Perspective on Euthanasia.David Shaw - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (2):123-125.
    In two recent papers, Hugh McLachlan, Jacob Busch and Raffaele Rodogno have criticised my new perspective on euthanasia. Each paper analyses my argument and suggests two flaws. McLachlan identifies what he sees as important points regarding the justification of legal distinctions in the absence of corresponding moral differences and the professional role of the doctor. Busch and Rodogno target my criterion of brain life, arguing that it is a necessary but not sufficient condition and that it is not generalisable. In (...)
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  37. added 2019-06-05
    Letter: Religion and Discussion of End-of-Life Care: The Hunt for the Hidden Confounder Must Begin.Richard Body - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (1):61-61.
    I would first like to congratulate Dr Seale for producing a thought-provoking piece of research that has captured the imagination of the nation's media. 1 I would also like to point out an interesting discordance that I have noted with regard to the findings of this important research, which ought to stimulate further discussion. Although religious doctors were significantly less likely than their non-religious colleagues to provide continuous or deep sedation until death or to provide treatment with at least ….
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  38. added 2019-06-05
    The Concise Argument: Highlights From This Issue.Søren Holm - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (6):325-325.
    End-of-life practices in German palliative careWe know that end-of-life practices in medicine vary widely across countries. The paper by Schildman et al reports a questionnaire survey of all members of the German Society for Palliative Medicine using the German language version of the EURELD survey instrument. 1 The study has a good response rate of 55.8% and finds that decisions to withdraw or withhold treatment are very common, but that German physicians estimate that the life-shortening effects of most of these (...)
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  39. added 2019-06-05
    The Introduction of Chlorpromazine in Belgium and the Netherlands ; Tango Between Old and New Treatment Features.Toine Pieters & Benoît Majerus - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (4):443-452.
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  40. added 2019-06-05
    ‘Early Terminal Sedation’ is a Distinct Entity.Victor Cellarius - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (1):46-54.
    ABSTRACTThere has been much discussion regarding the acceptable use of sedation for palliation. A particularly contentious practice concerns deep, continuous sedation given to patients who are not imminently dying and given without provision of hydration or nutrition, with the end result that death is hastened. This has been called ‘early terminal sedation’. Early terminal sedation is a practice composed of two legally and ethically accepted treatment options. Under certain conditions, patients have the right to reject hydration and nutrition, even if (...)
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  41. added 2019-06-05
    Paper: Changing Attitudes Towards Euthanasia Among Medical Students in Austria.Willibald J. Stronegger, Christin Schmölzer, Éva Rásky & Wolfgang Freidl - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):227-229.
    Background In most European countries the attitudes regarding the acceptability of active euthanasia have clearly changed in the population since World War II. Therefore, it is interesting to know which trends in attitudes prevail among the physicians of the future. Methods The present study analyses trends in the attitudes towards active euthanasia in medical students at the Medical University of Graz, Austria. The survey was conducted over a period of 9 years, enabling us to investigate trends regarding both attitudes and (...)
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  42. added 2019-06-05
    Suffering in the Context of Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: Transcending Job Through Wojtyla's Anthropology: Articles.Ashley K. Fernandes - 2010 - Christian Bioethics 16 (3):257-273.
    The debate over euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide continues to ignore the philosophical anthropology on which certain critical claims rest. In this paper, I offer several anthropologically based arguments against one prominent justification for EPAS: the Argument from the Evil of Suffering. I demonstrate that the argument is, at its core, a utilitarian one, and that a sound rebuttal can be found by examining Karol Wojtyla/Pope John Paul II's view of suffering as a transformative experience for the human person. Wojtyla both (...)
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  43. added 2019-06-05
    Law, Ethics and Medicine: Physicians’ Labelling of End-of-Life Practices: A Hypothetical Case Study.H. Buiting, A. van der Heide, B. Onwuteaka-Philipsen, M. Rurup & J. Rietjens - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):24-29.
    Objectives: To investigate why physicians label end-of-life acts as either ‘euthanasia/ending of life’ or ‘alleviation of symptoms/palliative or terminal sedation’, and to study the association of such labelling with intended reporting of these acts. Methods: Questionnaires were sent to a random, stratified sample of 2100 Dutch physicians. They were asked to label six hypothetical end-of-life cases: three ‘standard’ cases and three cases randomly selected, that varied according to type of medication, physician’s intention, type of patient request, patient’s life expectancy and (...)
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  44. added 2019-06-05
    Book Review: Neil M. Gorsuch, The Future of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia . Xi + 311 Pp. £18.95 , ISBN 978—0691—12458—2. [REVIEW]Wendy E. Hiscox - 2008 - Studies in Christian Ethics 21 (2):300-303.
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  45. added 2019-06-05
    Nurses' Attitudes to Euthanasia: The Influence of Empirical Studies and Methodological Concerns on Nursing Practice.Janet Holt - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (4):257-272.
    This paper introduces the controversy surrounding active voluntary euthanasia and describes the legal position on euthanasia and assisted suicide in the UK. Findings from studies of the nurses' attitudes to euthanasia from the national and international literature are reviewed. There are acknowledged difficulties in carrying out research into attitudes to euthanasia and hence the review of findings from the published studies is followed by a methodological review. This methodological review examines the research design and data collection methods used in the (...)
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  46. added 2019-06-05
    Nursing Involvement in Euthanasia: A ‘Nursing-as-Healing-Praxis’ Approach: Original Article.Helen McCabe - 2007 - Nursing Philosophy 8 (3):176-186.
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  47. added 2019-06-05
    Nursing Involvement in Euthanasia: How Sound is the Philosophical Support?: Original Article.Helen McCabe - 2007 - Nursing Philosophy 8 (3):167-175.
  48. added 2019-06-05
    On the Impermissibility of Euthanasia in Catholic Healthcare Organizations.Ana Iltis - 2006 - Christian Bioethics 12 (3):281-290.
    Roman Catholic healthcare institutions in the United States face a number of threats to the integrity of their missions, including the increasing religious and moral pluralism of society and the financial crisis many organizations face. These organizations in the United States often have fought fervently to avoid being obligated to provide interventions they deem intrinsically immoral, such as abortion. Such institutions no doubt have made numerous accommodations and changes in how they operate in response to the growing pluralism of our (...)
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  49. added 2019-06-05
    Book ReviewsJohn Keown,. Euthanasia, Ethics and Public Policy: An Argument Against Legislation.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Pp. 318. $65.00 ; $23.00. [REVIEW]John A. Robertson - 2004 - Ethics 114 (3):621-623.
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  50. added 2019-06-05
    Prolonging Life or Hindering Death? An Orthodox Perspective on Death, Dying and Euthanasia.Father Nikolaos Hatzinikolaou - 2003 - Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):187-201.
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