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1505 found
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  1. Bayrak, I., Analgesia and Euthanasia of Animals in Research.T. Altug & C. Karaca - forthcoming - Bioethics Congress.
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  2. Scott Bukatman, Terminal Identity.J. Armitage - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  3. Euthanasia and the Prolongation of Life.Tom L. Beauchamp & L. Walters - forthcoming - Contemporary Issues in Bioethics.
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  4. A Report From Lndia: The Jaina Ethic of Voluntary Death.P. Bilimoria - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  5. Euthanasia in a Welfare State: Experiences From the Review Procedure in the Netherlands.Theo A. Boer - forthcoming - Philosophy Study.
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  6. Editorial: Letting Babies Die.Margaret Brazier & David Archard - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  7. Death and Dying: Euthanasia and Sustaining Life.D. W. Brock & W. T. Reich - forthcoming - Encyclopedia of Bioethics.
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  8. What Does the Chilean Constitution Say About Euthanasia?Íñigo Álvarez Gálvez - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
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  9. What Does the Chilean Constitution Say About Euthanasia?Íñigo Álvarez Gálvez - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
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  10. What Does the Chilean Constitution Say About Euthanasia?Íñigo Álvarez Gálvez - forthcoming - Wiley: Developing World Bioethics.
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  11. The Dutch~ Experience with Euthanasia.Carlos F. Gomez - forthcoming - Bioethics Forum.
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  12. Down the Slippery Slope.Nils Holtug & Human Gene Therapy - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  13. New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia.M. Cholbi J. Varelius (ed.) - forthcoming - Springer.
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  14. Euthanasia: No Dogs or Philosophers Allowed.Ken Knisely, Michele Carter, John Loughney & Patrick Sullivan - forthcoming - DVD.
    Does each of us have the right to terminate our own existence if we so decide? Can we delegate this task to others? With what methods can we decide these questions? With Michele Carter, John Loughney, and Patrick Sullivan.
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  15. Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide.Michael Langford - forthcoming - Christians and Bioethics.
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  16. The Health Care Professional's Role When Active Euthanasia is Sought.Joanne Lynn - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  17. The Continuing Debate Over Active Euthanasia.John H. Pickering - forthcoming - Aba Bioethics Bull., Summer.
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  18. Do Sedation and Analgesia Improve Patientss Satisfaction.Roland Pulanić - forthcoming - Ethics.
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  19. Controversies Surrounding Continuous Deep Sedation at the End of Life: The Parliamentary and Societal Debates in France.Kasper Raus, Kenneth Chambaere & Sigrid Sterckx - forthcoming - Most Recent Articles: Bmc Medical Ethics.
    Continuous deep sedation at the end of life is a practice that has been the topic of considerable ethical debate, for example surrounding its perceived similarity or dissimilarity with physician-assisted dying...
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  20. Disputes in Bioethics: Abortion, Euthanasia, and Other Controversies.J. Burke Rea - forthcoming - Tandf: The New Bioethics:1-4.
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  21. The Role of a Mobile Palliative Care Team in the Field of Clinical Ethics.Marie-Sylvie Richard & Jean-Michel Lassaunière - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  22. Dying with Dignity, and Euthanasia: A View From the Netherlands.Henriëtte D. Roscam Abbing - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  23. Getting the Facts Right on Dutch Euthanasia.Peter Singer - forthcoming - The Daily Princetonian.
    In opposing the legalization of physician-assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia, Peter Harrell '02 in his April 3 column claims that the example of the Netherlands — so far the only country in the world where both of these practices take place openly and without fear of prosecution — shows that this would be a dangerous course to follow. But none of the evidence that he offers allows him to draw this conclusion.
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  24. Euthanasia and the Law: The California Referendum.Julie Sly - forthcoming - Communicating the Catholic Vision of Life: Proceedings of the Twelfth Bishops' Workshop, Dallas, Texas.
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  25. Belgian Politics in 1985.Jozef Smits - forthcoming - Res Publica.
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  26. How Voluntary is Voluntary Euthanasia?Isaac Van der Sluis - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  27. When Suffering is Unbearable: Physicians, Assisted Suicide, and Euthanasia.John R. Williams - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  28. Mutatis Mutandis … On Euthanasia and Advanced Dementia in the Netherlands.Martin Buijsen - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):40-53.
    Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are common practice in the Netherlands. In response to increasing requests from patients to end their lives, physicians are finding themselves placed in particularly precarious situations because of advance directives written by patients suffering from severe dementia. In April 2020, the Supreme Court of the Netherlands issued two judgments in the so-called Dormicum case: a case involving the deliberate termination of the life of a 74-year-old woman suffering from advanced dementia by a geriatrician in a nursing (...)
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  29. Attitudes About Withholding or Withdrawing Life-Prolonging Treatment, Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide, and Physician Assisted Suicide: A Cross-Sectional Survey Among the General Public in Croatia.Chris Gastmans, Bert Gordijn, Diana Spoljar, Jurica Vukovic, Filip Rubic, Milivoj Novak, Stjepan Oreskovic, Krunoslav Nikodem, Marko Curkovic & Ana Borovecki - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-16.
    BackgroundThere has been no in-depth research of public attitudes on withholding or withdrawing life-prolonging treatment, euthanasia, assisted suicide and physician assisted suicide in Croatia. The aim of this study was to examine these attitudes and their correlation with sociodemographic characteristics, religion, political orientation, tolerance of personal choice, trust in physicians, health status, experiences with death and caring for the seriously ill, and attitudes towards death and dying. MethodsA cross-sectional study was conducted on a three-stage random sample of adult citizens of (...)
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  30. Comparison of Attitude of Nurses and Nursing Students Toward Euthanasia.Alireza Khatony, Masoud Fallahi, Mansour Rezaei & Somayeh Mahdavikian - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):208-216.
    Background: Euthanasia is a controversial issue in many countries. However, there is little evidence about attitudes of nurses and nursing students toward euthanasia. Research aims: The present study aimed to compare nurses and nursing students' attitudes toward euthanasia. Research design: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Participants and research context: Using census sampling, 390 nurses and 125 nursing students were enrolled in this study. Methods: Data were collected using a socio-demographic questionnaire and Euthanasia Attitude Scale that included 20 items that (...)
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  31. The Unstable Boundary of Suffering-Based Euthanasia Regimes.Scott Y. H. Kim - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (2):59-62.
    Florijn’s helpful discussion of the Heringa case illustrates the difficulties in drawing a boundary on eligibility conditions for EAS. In Heringa, the Dutch Supreme Court reaffirmed...
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  32. Disputes in Bioethics: Abortion, Euthanasia, and Other Controversies.J. Burke Rea - 2022 - The New Bioethics 28 (1):83-86.
    In Disputes in Bioethics: Abortion, Euthanasia, and Other Controversies, Christopher Kaczor presents a series of his previously published articles addressing recent scholarship in bioethics. As suc...
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  33. Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Comparative Analysis of Dutch and East Asian Cases.Fengmin Shao, Yue Gu, Zhenxiang Zhang, Hui Zhang & Yuming Wang - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (2):74-76.
    The target article describes a Dutch case that happened in 2008, where Albert Heringa helped his 98-year-old mother, whose general practitioner rejected her request for an assisted d...
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  34. Aristotle on the Nature and Politics of Medicine.Samuel H. Baker - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (4):441-449.
    According to Aristotle, the medical art aims at health, which is a virtue of the body, and does so in an unlimited way. Consequently, medicine does not determine the extent to which health should be pursued, and “mental health” falls under medicine only via pros hen predication. Because medicine is inherently oriented to its end, it produces health in accordance with its nature and disease contrary to its nature—even when disease is good for the patient. Aristotle’s politician understands that this (...)
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  35. Why Using Religious Arguments in the Euthanasia Discussion is Problematic.Theodoor A. Boer - 2021 - Revista Latinoamericana de Bioética 21 (1).
    In discussions about assisted dying, those who argue ‘against’ legalisation often reason from a religious angle, whereas those ‘in favour’ adopt a secular stance. The Dutch experience is more nuanced: here, euthanasia advocacy largely originated from protestant religious believers. In this contribution, I criticise the use of religious arguments favouring any specific position. Religion may provide a heuristic context to explore norms relevant in the discussion, and religion may help us formulate our personal stance. But when it comes to societal (...)
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  36. Disability and the Complexity of Choice in the Ethics of Abortion and Voluntary Euthanasia.Shane Clifton - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 46 (4):431-450.
    In the polarized debates about abortion and voluntary euthanasia, disability advocates, who normally align with left-wing social forces, have tended to side with conservative and religious voices in expressing concerns about the impact of technological and sociopolitical developments on disabled futures. This paper draws on the social model of disability and the virtue ethics tradition to explain the alignment between the religious and disability perspectives, and the theory of transformative choice to highlight the limits and biases of the pro-choice logic. (...)
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  37. Living Your Best Life.August Gorman - 2021 - Analysis 81 (3):568-576.
    In Almost Over: Aging, Dying, Dead, Frances Kamm seeks to make sense of people’s widely variant choices about which lives they would choose to continue living. She does this by defending the Prudential Prerogative, which, in analogy to the Moral Prerogative, holds that in a fairly wide range of conditions we are under no intrapersonal rational obligation to choose either to die or to live on. I argue against Kamm's case for the Prudential Prerogative in favor of Life Holism, the (...)
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  38. Medical Assistance in Dying for the Psychiatrically Ill: Reply to Buturovic.Joshua James Hatherley - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (4):259-260.
  39. Attitudes on Euthanasia Among Medical Students and Doctors in Sri Lanka: A Cross Sectional Study.H. M. M. T. B. Herath, K. W. S. M. Wijayawardhana, U. I. Wickramarachchi & Chaturaka Rodrigo - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-8.
    Background Euthanasia is a topic of intense ethical debate and it is illegal in most countries at present, including Sri Lanka. The aim of this descriptive cross-sectional study of medical students and practicing doctors was to explore the acceptance of euthanasia and physician assisted suicide, and factors influencing this opinion. Methods A customised online questionnaire which explored opinions on euthanasia was administered to first and final year medical undergraduates in University of Colombo and practicing doctors with more than 5 years (...)
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  40. Advance Euthanasia Directives and the Dutch Prosecution.Jonathan A. Hughes - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (4):253-256.
    In a recent Dutch euthanasia case, a woman underwent euthanasia on the basis of an advance directive, having first been sedated without her knowledge and then restrained by members of her family while the euthanasia was administered. This article considers some implications of the criminal court’s acquittal of the doctor who performed the euthanasia. Supporters of advance euthanasia directives have welcomed the judgement as providing a clarification of the law, especially with regard to the admissibility of contextual evidence in interpreting (...)
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  41. Neonatal Euthanasia and the Groningen Protocol.Jacob J. Kon, A. A. Eduard Verhagen & Alexander A. Kon - 2021 - In Nico Nortjé & Johan C. Bester (eds.), Pediatric Ethics: Theory and Practice. Springer Verlag. pp. 291-311.
    NeonatalEuthanasia, neonataleuthanasiaEuthanasia has been legal in the NetherlandsNetherlands, The since 2005. Data indicate thatNeonatal, euthanasianeonatal euthanasiaEuthanasia, neonatal is practiced sub rosa by some clinicians in other countries as well; however, the true extent of neonatal euthanasiaEuthanasia, neonatal practice remains unknown. In this chapter, we review end-of-lifeEnd-of-life options to describe the ethical background in the adult setting and how these translate into the neonatal setting. Further, the ethical arguments in favor and opposed to allowing euthanasiaEuthanasia of infantsInfant, and those in favor (...)
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  42. Life Worth Living (Rev. Edn).Thaddeus Metz - 2021 - In Filomena Maggino (ed.), Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being Research, 2nd edn. Springer. pp. 1-4.
    An updated version of this encyclopedia entry on the concept of what, if anything, makes life worthwhile.
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  43. A Step Too Far or a Step in the Wrong Direction? A Critique of the 2014 Amendment to the Belgian Euthanasia Act.Joanna Murdoch - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (Suppl 1):103-116.
    In 2014, Article 3 of the the Belgian Euthanasia Act was amended to include the ‘capacity for discernment’ requirement. This paper explores the implications of this highly controversial Amendment. I remain unconvinced of the benefits for children < 12 years old suffering chronic or terminal illnesses. In Part One, I argue that the phrase ‘capacity for discernment’ is problematic and vulnerable to abuse; neither a consistent, widely accepted definition of the phrase has been established nor a standardised method or procedure (...)
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  44. Battlefield Euthanasia: Ethics and the Law.David L. Perry - 2021 - In Daniel Messelken & David Winkler (eds.), Health Care in Contexts of Risk, Uncertainty, and Hybridity. Springer. pp. 115-128.
    After briefly narrating the evolution of Western ethical reflections on suicide and euthanasia, I argue that because people have a prima facie right not to be killed, it is usually unethical to kill anyone who poses no imminent lethal threat to others or who has not committed a capital crime. But I’m also persuaded that some instances of mercy killing in war are not only morally justifiable, they can be more ethical than allowing someone to die in agony and distress (...)
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  45. Child Euthanasia and the Church.Thomas Pirog - 2021 - Ethics and Medics 46 (11):1-2.
    The creeping expansion of euthanasia around the world, but especially in the West, is a concern for any moral theologian. This expansion has already reached beyond the elderly into younger and objectively healthier groups, including children. The stance of the Catholic Church is that euthanasia is never permissible and must combat philosophies and laws that support it as fervently as possible.
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  46. Deconstruction of Discernment in Child Euthanasia.Elia R. G. Pusterla - 2021 - Philosophia 50 (2):671-690.
    Belgian law on child euthanasia uses the concept of discernment to bestow the right to die to minors. Jacques Derrida’s deconstruction of oppositional logic grasps the ambiguity of this use of discernment and generally challenges the alleged force of a textual sign meaningfully to differentiate itself from its different and meaningless else. This alleged ability to discern the presence of discernment impinges the truth-value of the distinction between worthy/unworthy lives. The resulting undecidability morally suggests the respect for otherness and promotes (...)
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  47. Pain, Suffering, and Euthanasia in Insects.Matan Shelomi - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (1):31-43.
    While unnecessarily killing or injuring an insect is arguably wrong, euthanasia of an accidentally injured insect raises anew issues of whether insects can experience pain. The question takes renewed significance due to increasing insect farming for food and feed and concerns over farmed insect welfare. For euthanasia of a damaged insect to be justifiable, the damage must be sensed as a noxious stimulus that the insect consciously experiences as pain. This pain must then lead to suffering or frustrated desire, with (...)
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  48. To Die or Not to Die: A Kantian Perspective on Euthanasia.Navin Sinha - 2021 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 39 (1):13-24.
    The paper attempts to explore the implications of Kant's moral criticism of suicide in the case of euthanasia. The paper argues that since Kant's criticism of suicide is essentially directed towards rational beings who are in full control of their rational faculty. It would hence not be applicable in case of individuals who are suffering from dementia and who have expressed a prior desire to be euthanized in such a scenario.
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  49. Why Do People Want to Die? The Meaning of Life From the Perspective of Euthanasia.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2021 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 90:297-311.
    One way to examine the enigmatic meaningfulness of human life is to ask under which conditions persons ask in earnest for assistance to die, either through euthanasia or physician assisted suicide. The counterpart of intolerable suffering must consist in some form of, however minimal, flourishing that makes people want to go on with their lives, disregarding other reasons to reject assisted dying that have more to do with religious prohibitions. To learn more about why persons want to hasten death during (...)
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  50. Organ Donation After Euthanasia Starting at Home in a Patient with Multiple System Atrophy.Walther van Mook, Jan Bollen, Wim de Jongh, A. Kempener-Deguelle, David Shaw, Elien Pragt, Nathalie van Dijk & Najat Tajaâte - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-6.
    Background A patient who fulfils the due diligence requirements for euthanasia, and is medically suitable, is able to donate his organs after euthanasia in Belgium, the Netherlands and Canada. Since 2012, more than 70 patients have undergone this combined procedure in the Netherlands. Even though all patients who undergo euthanasia are suffering hopelessly and unbearably, some of these patients are nevertheless willing to help others in need of an organ. Organ donation after euthanasia is a so-called donation after circulatory death, (...)
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