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  1.  79
    "The Picture of Dorian Gray": Wilde's Parable of the Fall.Joyce Carol Oates - 1980 - Critical Inquiry 7 (2):419-428.
    Beyond the defiance of the young iconoclast—Wilde himself, of course—and the rather perfunctory curve of Dorian Gray to that gothic final sight , there is another, possibly less strident, but more central theme. That one is damned for selling one's soul to the devil is a commonplace in legends; what arrests our attention more, perhaps, is Wilde's claim or boast or worry or warning that one might indeed be poisoned by a book . . . and that the artist, even (...)
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  2.  56
    The Magnanimity of "Wuthering Heights".Joyce Carol Oates - 1982 - Critical Inquiry 9 (2):435-449.
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  3.  86
    "Is This the Promised End?": The Tragedy of King Lear.Joyce Carol Oates - 1974 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 33 (1):19-32.
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  4.  38
    Frankenstein's Fallen Angel.Joyce Carol Oates - 1984 - Critical Inquiry 10 (3):543-554.
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  5.  30
    Lawrence's "Gotterdammerung": The Tragic Vision of "Women in Love".Joyce Carol Oates - 1978 - Critical Inquiry 4 (3):559-578.
    In his travels, and in his accompanying readings, he had come to the conclusion that the essential secret of life was harmony. . . . And he proceeded to put his philosophy into practice by forcing order into the established world, translating the mystic word harmony into the practical word organisation.1 Harmony becomes organization. And Gerald dedicates himself to work, to feverish, totally absorbing work, inspired with an almost religious exaltation in his fight with matter. The world is split in (...)
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  6.  62
    The Double Vision of the Brothers Karamazov.Joyce Carol Oates - 1968 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 27 (2):203-213.
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  7.  25
    Soul at the White Heat: The Romance of Emily Dickinson's Poetry.Joyce Carol Oates - 1987 - Critical Inquiry 13 (4):806-824.
    Emily Dickinson is the most paradoxical of poets: the very poet of paradox. By way of voluminous biographical material, not to mention the extraordinary intimacy of her poetry, it would seem that we know everything about her; yet the common experience of reading her work, particularly if the poems are read sequentially, is that we come away seeming to know nothing. We could recognize her inimitable voice anywhere—in the “prose” of her letters no less than in her poetry—yet it is (...)
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  8.  15
    Jocoserious Joyce.Joyce Carol Oates - 1976 - Critical Inquiry 2 (4):677-688.
    Ulysses is certainly the greatest novel in the English language, and one might argue for its being the greatest single work of art in our tradition. How significant, then, and how teasing, that this masterwork should be a comedy, and that its creator should have explicitly valued the comic "vision" over the tragic—how disturbing to our predilection for order that, with an homage paid to classical antiquity so meticulous that it is surely a burlesque, Joyce's exhibitionististicicity is never so serious (...)
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  9. Ethics, Literature, and Theory: An Introductory Reader.Wayne C. Booth, Dudley Barlow, Orson Scott Card, Anthony Cunningham, John Gardner, Marshall Gregory, John J. Han, Jack Harrell, Richard E. Hart, Barbara A. Heavilin, Marianne Jennings, Charles Johnson, Bernard Malamud, Toni Morrison, Georgia A. Newman, Joyce Carol Oates, Jay Parini, David Parker, James Phelan, Richard A. Posner, Mary R. Reichardt, Nina Rosenstand, Stephen L. Tanner, John Updike, John H. Wallace, Abraham B. Yehoshua & Bruce Young - 2005 - Sheed & Ward.
    Do the rich descriptions and narrative shapings of literature provide a valuable resource for readers, writers, philosophers, and everyday people to imagine and confront the ultimate questions of life? Do the human activities of storytelling and complex moral decision-making have a deep connection? What are the moral responsibilities of the artist, critic, and reader? What can religious perspectives—from Catholic to Protestant to Mormon—contribute to literary criticism? Thirty well known contributors reflect on these questions, including iterary theorists Marshall Gregory, James Phelan, (...)
     
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  10. Soul at the White Heat the Romance of Dickinson, Emily Poetry.Joyce Carol Oates - 1987 - Critical Inquiry 13 (4):806-824.