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  1.  34
    Brainwashing: The Science of Thought Control.Kathleen Taylor - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Bringing together cutting-edge research from psychology and neuroscience, Kathleen Taylor puts the brain back into brainwashing and shows why understanding this mysterious phenomenon is vitally relevant in the twenty-first century.
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  2.  24
    Cruelty: Human Evil and the Human Brain.Kathleen Taylor - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    What is cruelty? What makes some people cruel? Under what conditions can cruelty grow? Taylor draws together aspects of psychology, sociology, philosophy, and her own field of neuroscience, illustrated with examples from history and the arts, in this thoughtful exploration of the nature and origins of cruelty, and how we might seek to reduce it.
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  3.  74
    Applying Continuous Modelling to Consciousness.Kathleen Taylor - 2001 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (2):45-60.
    Much of neuroscience is currently dominated by an information processing metaphor which is largely conceptualized in discrete terms. An alternative metaphor conceptualizes information flow as continuous. A qualitative set of hypotheses based on this metaphor, the energy model, is described here. This model considers information transfer in terms of the flow of an abstract variable, energy, between points in a field comprising the extent of the nervous system. Although extremely simple, it generates some intriguing consequences. In particular, it provides a (...)
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  4.  10
    Salience, Saccades, and the Role of Cortex.Kathleen Taylor - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):698-699.
    Findlay & Walker's target article proposes a model of saccade generation related to the underlying neuroscience. A problem with such models is the number of brain areas showing oculomotor function. Traditionally, therefore, models have been partial, usually concentrating either on cortex (Liu et al. 1997; Pierrot Deseilligny et al. 1995) or on the superior colliculus and brainstem circuits (Moschovakis 1994; Van Gisbergen et al. 1993). Findlay & Walker's model attempts to integrate both levels within a functional framework. To some extent (...)
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