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  1.  11
    The Good, the Wild, and the Native: An Ethical Evaluation of Ecological Restoration, Native Landscaping, and the 'Wild Ones' of Wisconsin.Laura M. Hartman & Kathleen M. Wooley - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (5):579-603.
    Ecological restoration and native landscaping are increasing, particularly in the American Midwest, where they form part of the area's history and culture of conservation. But practitioners rarely pause to ask philosophical questions related to categories of native and invasive or human control and harmony with nature. This article brings philosophy into conversation with practice, using members of Wild Ones Native Landscaping, a non-profit headquartered in Neenah, WI, as a case study. Philosophers and ethicists who are studying Ecological Restoration and Native (...)
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  2.  10
    The Christian Consumer: Living Faithfully in a Fragile World.Laura M. Hartman - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    Consumption--the flow of physical materials in human lives--is an important ethical issue. Be it fair trade coffee or foreign oil, North Americans' consumption choices affect the well-being of humans around the globe, in addition to impacting the natural world and consumers themselves. In this book, Laura Hartman seeks to formulate a coherent Christian ethic of consumption.
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  3.  9
    Climate Engineering and the Playing God Critique.Laura M. Hartman - 2017 - Ethics and International Affairs 31 (3):313-333.
    Climate engineering is subject to the “playing God” critique, which charges that humans should not undertake to control nature in ways that seem to overstep the proper scope of human agency. This argument is easily discredited, and in fact the opposite—that we should “play God”—may be equally valid in some circumstances. To revive the playing God critique, I argue that it functions not on a logical but on a symbolic and emotional level to highlight nostalgia for functional dualisms in the (...)
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  4.  22
    Environmental Modesty.Laura M. Hartman - 2015 - Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):475-492.
    Despite this virtue's history as an instrument of women's oppression, modesty, at its most basic, means voluntary restraint of one's power, undertaken for the sake of others. It is a mechanism that modifies unequal power relationships and encourages greater compassion and fairness. I use a Christian perspective with influences from Jewish and Muslim sources to examine modesty. The modest person, I argue, must be in relationship with others, must be honestly aware of her impacts on others, must be sensitive to (...)
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  5.  31
    Seeking Food Justice.Laura M. Hartman - 2013 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 67 (4):396-409.
    Seeking justice, as Christians, means seriously reconsidering our food consumption in light of multiple instances of injustice: maltreatment of workers, animals, and the environment; and misdistribution of food both globally and domestically. A variety of solutions—including boycotts, labeling, local consumption, generous donations, and Food Sovereignty—would lead to a more just food system.
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  6.  8
    ‘More Than an Idea or a Norm’: Religion, Justice, and Practicality in Dialog with the Tollgate Principles.Forrest Clingerman, Laura M. Hartman & Kevin J. O’Brien - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):190-193.
  7.  16
    Streets to Live In: Justice, Space, and Sharing the Road.Laura M. Hartman & David Prytherch - 2015 - Environmental Ethics 37 (1):21-44.
    Public streets are central to the built environment, where individuals seek a fair share of the roadway’s benefits and harms. But the American street, an asphalt landscape typically defined and designed for cars, can be inaccessible, unhealthy, and dangerous for the non-motorized, whose transportation choices have the smallest ecological footprint. Concern for social equity and sustainability requires rethinking the street geographically and ethically, and asking: “In what sense is the street a space of justice? How do traditional street regulation and (...)
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  8.  5
    Approaching the End: Eschatological Reflections on Church, Politics, and Life by Stanley Hauerwas, And: Without Apology: Sermons for Christ’s Church by Stanley Hauerwas.Laura M. Hartman - 2015 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 35 (2):215-217.
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  9. Consuming Christ.Laura M. Hartman - 2010 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 30 (1):45-62.
    THIS ESSAY EXAMINES FEASTING AND FASTING IN LIGHT OF CHRISTIAN DEsires to eat as, with, and for Christ. Christ both fasted and feasted; Christians, in following his example, may embody him, encounter him, and eat in certain ways for his sake. In the Eucharist, Christians encounter and embody Christ, illuminating the ways that eating can be a holy practice. The Eucharist offers Christians transformative guidance and practical synthesis, allowing them to navigate the extremes of fasting and feasting. It encompasses and (...)
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  10. Environmental Stewardship: Critical Perspectives—Past and Present; Theology That Matters: Ecology, Economy, and God.Laura M. Hartman - 2009 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 29 (1):263-266.
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