7 found
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  1.  46
    The Difference That Culture Can Make in End-of-Life Decisionmaking.H. Eugene Hern, Barbara A. Koenig, Lisa Jean Moore & Patricia A. Marshall - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (1):27-40.
    Cultural difference has been largely ignored within bioethics, particularly within the end-of-life discourses and practices that have developed over the past two decades in the U.S. healthcare system. Yet how should culturebe taken into account?
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  2.  15
    Clitoral Conventions and Transgressions: Graphic Representations in Anatomy Texts, C1900-1991.Lisa Jean Moore - 1995 - Feminist Studies 21 (2):255.
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  3.  36
    “We Won't Know Who You Are”: Contesting Sex Designations in New York City Birth Certificates.Paisley Currah & Lisa Jean Moore - 2008 - Hypatia 24 (3):113-135.
    This article examines shifts in the legal, medical, and common-sense logics governing the designation of sex on birth certificates issued by the City of New York between 1965 and 2006. In the initial iteration, the stabilization of legal sex categories was organized around the notion of “fraud”; in the most recent iteration, “permanence” became the measure of authenticity. We frame these legal constructions of sex with theories about the “natural attitude” toward gender.
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  4.  25
    The Traffic in Cyberanatomies: Sex/Gender/Sexualities in Local and Global Formations.Lisa Jean Moore & Adele E. Clarke - 2001 - Body and Society 7 (1):57-96.
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  5.  2
    Introduction to The Silent Majority: Invertebrates in Human-Animal Studies.Lisa Jean Moore & Rhoda M. Wilkie - 2019 - Society and Animals 27 (7):653-655.
    This essay introduces the rationale for and the contributions to the special issue The Silent Majority: Invertebrates in Human-Animal Studies.
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    How Prevalent Are Invertebrates in Human-Animal Scholarship? Scoping Study of Anthrozoös and Society & Animals.Rhoda M. Wilkie, Lisa Jean Moore & Claire Molloy - 2019 - Society and Animals 27 (7):656-677.
    The field of Human-Animal Studies is about human-animal relations. However, which nonhuman animals does the field encompass? In recent years, some scholars have noted a bias towards vertebrate species, especially domesticated mammals. To assess how prevalent invertebrates have been in HAS scholarship, a three-stage scoping study was conducted of two pioneering journals in the field: Anthrozoös and Society & Animals. This article reports on preliminary findings and confirms that human-animal scholarship, as presented in these two leading journals, is characterized by (...)
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  7.  16
    The Geriatric Clinic: Dry and Limp: Aging Queers, Zombies, and Sexual Reanimation. [REVIEW]Shaka McGlotten & Lisa Jean Moore - 2013 - Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):261-268.
    This essay looks to the omission of aging queer bodies from new medical technologies of sex. We extend the Foucauldian space of the clinic to the mediascape, a space not only of representations but where the imagination is conditioned and different worlds dreamed into being. We specifically examine the relationship between aging queers and the marketing of technologies of sexual function. We highlight the ways queers are excluded from the spaces of the clinic, specifically the heternormative sexual scripts that organize (...)
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