8 found
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  1. Embodying Emotions: What Emotion Theorists Can Learn From Simulations of Emotions. [REVIEW]Matthew P. Spackman & David Miller - 2008 - Minds and Machines 18 (3):357-372.
    Cognitively-oriented theories have dominated the recent history of the study of emotion. However, critics of this perspective suggest the role of the body in the experience of emotion is largely ignored by cognitive theorists. As an alternative to the cognitive perspective, critics are increasingly pointing to William James’ theory, which emphasized somatic aspects of emotions. This emerging emphasis on the embodiment of emotions is shared by those in the field of AI attempting to model human emotions. Behavior-based agents in AI (...)
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  2.  1
    A Cross-Cultural Comparison of American and Japanese Experiences of Personal and Vicarious Shame.Niwako Yamawaki, W. Gerrod Parrott & Matthew P. Spackman - 2015 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 15 (1-2):64-86.
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    Emotionology in Prose: A Study of Descriptions of Emotions From Three Literary Periods.Matthew P. Spackman & W. Gerrod Parrott - 2001 - Cognition and Emotion 15 (5):553-573.
  4.  6
    Emotionology in Prose: A Study of Descriptions of Emotions From Three Literary Periods.Matthew P. Spackman & W. Gerrod Parrott - 2001 - Cognition and Emotion 15 (5):553-573.
  5.  7
    Infants and Emotions: How the Ancients' Theories Inform Modern Issues.Matthew P. Spackman - 1999 - Cognition and Emotion 13 (6):795-811.
  6. How to Do Things with Emotions.Matthew P. Spackman - 2002 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 23 (4):393-412.
    J.L. Austin described speech acts as utterances which are themselves actions, and not simply descriptions of actions or states of affairs. It is suggested that emotions are also actions, and not simply results of actions. Emotions may be conceived as attunements in the phenomenological tradition, as means of experiencing the world. Understood as attunements, emotions are actions in the sense that they do not simply result from appraisal processes or social constraints, but are themselves our engagements with the world. Three (...)
     
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  7.  9
    On the Possible Non-Existence of Sabini and Silver's Emotions: A Critical Review of Emotion, Character, and Responsibility.Matthew P. Spackman - 1999 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):217-225.
    In Emotion, character, and responsibility, J. Sabini and M. Silver set out to show specifically why emotions are important in the conception of a person's character. Thus, their collection of previously published material tackles the daunting task of explaining how and why it is that it is often considered that peoples' emotions reflect upon their characters. What the present author finds particularly appealing, as well as convincing, in all of these writings is Sabini and Silver's grounding of their arguments in (...)
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    Do Emotions Have Distinct Vocal Profiles? A Study of Idiographic Patterns of Expression.Matthew P. Spackman, Bruce L. Brown & Sean Otto - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (8):1565-1588.