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  1.  3
    Are People Experiencing the ‘Pains of Imprisonment’ During the COVID-19 Lockdown?Mandeep K. Dhami, Leonardo Weiss-Cohen & Peter Ayton - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  2. Affective Forecasting: Why Can't People Predict Their Emotions?Peter Ayton, Alice Pott & Najat Elwakili - 2007 - Thinking and Reasoning 13 (1):62 – 80.
    Two studies explore the frequently reported finding that affective forecasts are too extreme. In the first study, driving test candidates forecast the emotional consequences of failing. Test failers overestimated the duration of their disappointment. Greater previous experience of this emotional event did not lead to any greater accuracy of the forecasts, suggesting that learning about one's own emotions is difficult. Failers' self-assessed chances of passing were lower a week after the test than immediately prior to the test; this difference correlated (...)
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  3.  23
    Inappropriate Judgements: Slips, Mistakes or Violations?Peter Ayton & Nigel Harvey - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):12-12.
  4. Memory Strategies Mediate the Relationships Between Memory and Judgment.Silvio Aldrovandi, Marie Poirier, Daniel Heussen & Peter Ayton - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
    In the literature, the nature of the relationships between memory processes and summary evaluations is still a debate. According to some theoretical approaches (e.g., “two-memory hypothesis”; Anderson, 1989) retrospective evaluations are based on the impression formed while attending to the to-be-assessed stimuli(on-line judgment) – no functional dependence between information retrieval and judgment is implied. Conversely, several theories entail that judgment must depend, at least in part, on memory processes (e.g., Dougherty, Gettys, & Ogden, 1999; Schwarz, 1998; Tversky & Kahneman, 1973). (...)
     
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  5. Persistence is Futile: Chasing of Past Performance in Repeated Investment Choices.Leonardo Weiss-Cohen, Philip W. S. Newall & Peter Ayton - forthcoming - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied.
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    My Imagination Versus Your Feelings: Can Personal Affective Forecasts Be Improved by Knowing Other Peoples’ Emotions?Emma Walsh & Peter Ayton - 2009 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 15 (4):351-360.
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  7.  24
    Do the Birds and Bees Need Cognitive Reform?Peter Ayton - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (5):666-667.
    Stanovich & West argue that their observed positive correlations between performance of reasoning tasks and intelligence strengthen the standing of normative rules for determining rationality. I question this argument. Violations of normative rules by cognitively humble creatures in their natural environments are more of a problem for normative rules than for the creatures.
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  8.  4
    Cognitive Predictors of Precautionary Behavior During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Volker Thoma, Leonardo Weiss-Cohen, Petra Filkuková & Peter Ayton - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The attempts to mitigate the unprecedented health, economic, and social disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic are largely dependent on establishing compliance to behavioral guidelines and rules that reduce the risk of infection. Here, by conducting an online survey that tested participants’ knowledge about the disease and measured demographic, attitudinal, and cognitive variables, we identify predictors of self-reported social distancing and hygiene behavior. To investigate the cognitive processes underlying health-prevention behavior in the pandemic, we co-opted the dual-process model of thinking (...)
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