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  1.  9
    A Belmont Reboot: Building a Normative Foundation for Human Research in the 21st Century.Kyle B. Brothers, Suzanne M. Rivera, R. Jean Cadigan, Richard R. Sharp & Aaron J. Goldenberg - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (1):165-172.
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  2.  25
    Modernizing Research Regulations Is Not Enough: It's Time to Think Outside the Regulatory Box.Suzanne M. Rivera, Kyle B. Brothers, R. Jean Cadigan, Heather L. Harrell, Mark A. Rothstein, Richard R. Sharp & Aaron J. Goldenberg - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (7):1-3.
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  3.  23
    A Trade Secret Model for Genomic Biobanking.John M. Conley, Robert Mitchell, R. Jean Cadigan, Arlene M. Davis, Allison W. Dobson & Ryan Q. Gladden - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (3):612-629.
    The current ethical norms of genomic biobanking creating and maintaining large repositories of human DNA and/or associated data for biomedical research have generated criticism from every angle, at both the practical and theoretical levels. The traditional research model has involved investigators seeking biospecimens for specific purposes that they can describe and disclose to prospective subjects, from whom they can then seek informed consent. In the case of many biobanks, however, the institution that collects and maintains the biospecimens may not itself (...)
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  4.  4
    “If It’s Ethical During a Pandemic…”: Lessons From COVID-19 for Post-Pandemic Biobanking.Kyle B. Brothers, Aaron J. Goldenberg & R. Jean Cadigan - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (12):34-36.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in widespread disruption of the typical way of doing things. In nearly every industry, responses to the pandemic have brought about departures from standard opera...
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    Exploring the Emotional Labor of Medical Trainees in the Setting of Ethics Education.Margaret Waltz, R. Jean Cadigan & Arlene M. Davis - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (12):65-66.
    Volume 19, Issue 12, December 2019, Page 65-66.
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  6.  13
    Scientific Social Responsibility: Lessons From the Corporate Social Responsibility Movement.John M. Conley, Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz, Anya E. R. Prince, Arlene M. Davis & R. Jean Cadigan - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (12):64-66.
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  7.  12
    Automatic Placement of Genomic Research Results in Medical Records: Do Researchers Have a Duty? Should Participants Have a Choice?Anya E. R. Prince, John M. Conley, Arlene M. Davis, Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz & R. Jean Cadigan - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (4):827-842.
    The growing practice of returning individual results to research participants has revealed a variety of interpretations of the multiple and sometimes conflicting duties that researchers may owe to participants. One particularly difficult question is the nature and extent of a researcher’s duty to facilitate a participant’s follow-up clinical care by placing research results in the participant’s medical record. The question is especially difficult in the context of genomic research. Some recent genomic research studies — enrolling patients as participants — boldly (...)
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  8.  5
    Automatic Placement of Genomic Research Results in Medical Records: Do Researchers Have a Duty? Should Participants Have a Choice?Anya E. R. Prince, John M. Conley, Arlene M. Davis, Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz & R. Jean Cadigan - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (4):827-842.
    The growing practice of returning individual results to research participants has revealed a variety of interpretations of the multiple and sometimes conflicting duties that researchers may owe to participants. One particularly difficult question is the nature and extent of a researcher’s duty to facilitate a participant’s follow-up clinical care by placing research results in the participant’s medical record. The question is especially difficult in the context of genomic research. Some recent genomic research studies — enrolling patients as participants — boldly (...)
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