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  1.  26
    Being trustworthy: going beyond evidence to desiring.R. Scott Webster - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):152-162.
    If educators are to educate they must be accorded some level of trust. Anthony Giddens claims that because trust is not easily created, it is now being replaced with ‘confidence’ because this latter disposition is much easier to give and is more convenient. It is argued in this paper that this shift from trust to confidence stifles education because emphasis is placed solely upon qualifications and competence, and is neglectful of disclosing one’s motives and desires—which are considered to be essential (...)
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  2.  32
    Does the australian national framework for values education stifle an education for world peace?R. Scott Webster - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (4):462-475.
    This paper aims to offer an evaluation of Australia's National Framework for Values Education in terms of its educative value. The criteria to be employed in this evaluation shall be drawn primarily from the works of UNESCO and John Dewey. In addition to a re-evaluation of values, consideration will also be given to how individual learners are being prepared to participate democratically in the quest for world peace. It will therefore be necessary to determine whether the Australian framework promotes the (...)
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  3.  18
    Must Dewey and Kierkegaard's Inquiry for World Peace be Violent?R. Scott Webster - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):521-533.
    Amongst the many aims of education, surely the pursuit of global peace must be one of the most significant. The mandate of UNESCO is to pursue world peace through education by primarily promoting collaboration. The sort of collaboration that UNESCO endorses involves democratic dialogue, where various persons from differing backgrounds can come together, listen, negotiate and discuss possible ways in which peace might be pursued. While this sort of democratic dialogue with its associated free intellectual inquiry is more readily acceptable (...)
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  4.  24
    Dewey's democracy as the kingdom of God on earth.R. Scott Webster - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (4):615-632.
    John Dewey has been portrayed as a sort of villain in Rosenow's (1997) article which appeared in this journal, apparently because he was unfairly opposed to God and to religion, and also because he deliberately usurped religious language to 'camouflage' his secular ideas. By drawing mainly upon similar sources but with some important additions, I wish to challenge the four major concerns raised in Rosenow's article and in doing so aim to offer an alternative interpretation. It is understood here that (...)
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  5.  22
    Centring the subject in order to educate.R. Scott Webster - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (5):519–530.
    It is important for educators to recognise that the various calls to decentre the subject—or self—should not be interpreted as necessarily requiring the removal of the subject altogether. Through the individualism of the Enlightenment the self was centred. This highly individualistic notion of the sovereign self has now been decentred especially through post‐structuralist literature. It is contended here however, that this tendency to decentre the subject has been taken to an extreme at times, especially by some designers of school frameworks (...)
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  6.  3
    Spiritual education for a post-capitalist society.R. Scott Webster - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (3):288-298.
    The dominance of capitalism, through the hegemony of neoliberal ideology, is maintained as an illusion through the use of four main strategies. In order to obtain the consent of the population, mass schooling tends to produce graduates who accept this illusion because they are vulnerable to these strategies and cannot imagine a post-capitalist world. However, through education, people can better appreciate the problematic reality of unbridled capitalism, such as the degradation of the global ecosystem. It is argued here that programs (...)
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