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  1.  27
    Ethical and Legal Dilemmas in the Management of Family Violence.Richard Bourne - 1995 - Ethics and Behavior 5 (3):261 – 271.
    Hospital-based professionals who manage cases of family violence are often unclear about the benefits and costs of particular interventions to their clients. Operating under conditions of potential lethality, both to them and family members, clinicians often experience conflict between legal and ethical recommendations or between strategies intended to provide safety to victims of domestic (spousal) violence and those meant to protect children from abuse. This article presents a situation of family violence and the dilemmas of decision-making confronting both social worker (...)
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  2.  38
    Communication, Punishment, and Virtue.Richard Bourne - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (1):78-107.
    This essay suggests that while Antony Duff's model of criminal punishment as secular penance is pregnant with possibilities for theological reception and reflection, it proceeds by way of a number of separations that are brought into question by the penitential traditions of Christianity. The first three of these—between justice and mercy, censure and invitation, and state and victim, constrain the true communicative character of his account of punishment. The second set of oppositions, between sacrament and virtue, interior character and external (...)
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  3.  19
    Mandated Child Abuse Reporting.Richard Bourne, Eli H. Newberger & C. Sue White - forthcoming - Ethics and Behavior.
  4.  10
    Poor Marge: The Sweating Will Continue for Some Time.Richard Bourne - 1997 - Ethics and Behavior 7 (4):386 – 388.
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  5. Special Section: Editor's Note: Ethical and Legal Dilemmas in the Management of Family Violence.Richard Bourne - 1995 - Ethics and Behavior 5 (3):261 – 271.
    Hospital-based professionals who manage cases of family violence are often unclear about the benefits and costs of particular interventions to their clients. Operating under conditions of potential lethality, both to them and family members, clinicians often experience conflict between legal and ethical recommendations or between strategies intended to provide safety to victims of domestic (spousal) violence and those meant to protect children from abuse. This article presents a situation of family violence and the dilemmas of decision-making confronting both social worker (...)
     
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