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  1.  19
    Awe for the Tiger, Love for the Lamb: A Chronicle of Sensibility to Animals.Rod Preece (ed.) - 2002 - Ubc Press.
    From the myths of the ancient world to the Middle Ages to Darwin and beyond, Preece captures the most telling and fascinating accounts of humankind's ...
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  2. The Status of Animals in Biblical and Christian Thought: A Study in Colliding Values.Rod Preece & David Fraser - 2000 - Society and Animals 8 (3):245-263.
    A common contemporary view is that the Bible and subsequent Christian thought authorize humans to exploit animals purely as means to human ends. This paper argues that Biblical and Christian thought have given rise to a more complex ethic of animal use informed by its pastoralist origins, Biblical pronouncements that permit different interpretations, and competing ideas and doctrines that arose during its development, and influenced by the rich and often contradictory features of ancient Hebrew and Greco-Roman traditions. The result is (...)
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  3.  22
    Darwinism, Christianity, and the Great Vivisection Debate.Rod Preece - 2003 - Journal of the History of Ideas 64 (3):399-419.
  4.  38
    Animal Ethics and the Scientific Study of Animals: Bridging the “Is” and the “Ought”.David Fraser & Rod Preece - 2004 - Essays in Philosophy 5 (2):12.
    From ancient Greece to the present, philosophers have variously emphasized either the similarities or the differences between humans and nonhuman animals as a basis for ethical conclusions. Thus animal ethics has traditionally involved both factual claims, usually about animals’ mental states and capacities, and ethical claims about their moral standing. However, even in modern animal ethics the factual claims are often scientifically uninformed, involve broad generalizations about diverse taxonomic groups, and show little agreement about how to resolve the contradictions. Research (...)
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  5. Strangers to Nature: Animal Lives and Human Ethics.Drucilla Cornell, Julian H. Franklin, Heather M. Kendrick, Eduardo Mendieta, Andrew Linzey, Paola Cavalieri, Rod Preece, Ted Benton, Michael J. Thompson, Michael Allen Fox, Lori Gruen, Ralph R. Acampora, Bernard Rollin & Peter Sloterdijk (eds.) - 2012 - Lexington Books.
    Strangers to Nature brings together many of the leading scholars who are working to redefine and expand the discourse on animal ethics. This volume will engage both scholars and lay-people by revealing the breadth of theorizing about the human/non-human animal relationship that is currently taking place.
     
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  6. Awe for the Tiger, Love for the Lamb: A Chronicle of Sensibility to Animals.Rod Preece (ed.) - 2002 - Routledge.
    First Published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  7. Brill Online Books and Journals.Rod Preece & David Fraser - 2000 - Society and Animals 8 (3):245-263.
    A common contemporary view is that the Bible and subsequent Christian thought authorize humans to exploit animals purely as means to human ends. This paper argues that Biblical and Christian thought have given rise to a more complex ethic of animal use informed by its pastoralist origins, Biblical pronouncements that permit different interpretations, and competing ideas and doctrines that arose during its development, and influenced by the rich and often contradictory features of ancient Hebrew and Greco-Roman traditions. The result is (...)
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  8.  20
    Thoughts Out of Season on the History of Animal Ethics.Rod Preece - 2007 - Society and Animals 15 (4):365-378.
    Contrary to conventional wisdom, the earlier Western tradition did not customarily deny souls per se to nonhuman animals; when it denied immortal souls to animals, it sometimes deemed that denial a reason for giving greater consideration to animals in their earthly existence. Nor has the Western tradition uniformly deemed animals intended for human use. Further, there was considerable opposition to the Cartesian view of animals as insentient machines, and—even among those who were convinced—it was not unknown for them to deem (...)
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