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  1. The Triumph of Sociobiology.John Alcock - 2003 - Journal of the History of Biology 36 (3):615-618.
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  2. Beyond the Sociobiology of Sexuality: Predictive Hypotheses.John Alcock - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):181.
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  3. Book Review: The Stag Hunt and the Evolution of Social Structure. [REVIEW]J. McKenzie Alexander - unknown
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  4. Reply to Lansanna Keita on “Marxism and Human Sociobiology”.Garland E. Allen - 1991 - Biology and Philosophy 6 (4):453-456.
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  5. Marxism and Human Sociobiology-Reply.Ge Allen - 1991 - Biology and Philosophy 6 (4):453-456.
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  6. Kamikazes and Cultural Evolution.Sean Allen-Hermanson - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Biological and Biomedical Sciences 61:11-19.
  7. In Gods We Trust: The Evolutionary Landscape of Religion.Scott Atran - 2002 - Oup Usa.
    This ambitious, interdisciplinary book seeks to explain the origins of religion using our knowledge of the evolution of cognition. A cognitive anthropologist and psychologist, Scott Atran argues that religion is a by-product of human evolution just as the cognitive intervention, cultural selection, and historical survival of religion is an accommodation of certain existential and moral elements that have evolved in the human condition.
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  8. Sociobiology and Ethics. [REVIEW]Francisco J. Ayala - 1987 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 9 (2):315 - 325.
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  9. Sociobiology, Sex, and Science - Holcomb, H. R., (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1993), X+447 Pp., ISBN 0-7914-1260-1 Paperback. [REVIEW]E. B. - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 29 (1):201-210.
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  10. Science or Ideology? : Sociobiology and its Aftermath.Murat Bayar - 2010 - In Howard J. Wiarda (ed.), Grand Theories and Ideologies in the Social Sciences. Palgrave-Macmillan.
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  11. Functional Analyses and Their Justification.William Bechtel - 1988 - Biology and Philosophy 3 (2):157.
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  12. An Intellectual Legacy of the Past: The Reception of Sociobiology in the East-European Countries. [REVIEW]Tamas Bereczkei - 1993 - Biology and Philosophy 8 (4):399-407.
    Sociobiology has not been well received in Eastern Europe. Reasons for this are listed and discussed. It is suggested that times are changing and that sociobiology will have more success in the future.
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  13. Social Revolution. [REVIEW]Birch Jonathan - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (4):571-581.
    Andrew Bourke’s Principles of Social Evolution identifies three stages that characterize an evolutionary transition in individuality and deploys inclusive fitness theory to explain each stage. The third stage, social group transformation, has hitherto received relatively little attention from inclusive fitness theorists. In this review, I first discuss Bourke’s “virtual dominance” hypothesis for the evolution of the germ line. I then contrast Bourke’s inclusive fitness approach to the major transitions with the multi-level approach developed by Richard Michod, Samir Okasha and others. (...)
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  14. Kin Selection, Group Selection, and the Varieties of Population Structure.Jonathan Birch - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axx028.
    Various results show the ‘formal equivalence’ of kin and group selectionist methodologies, but this does not preclude there being a real and useful distinction between kin and group selection processes. I distinguish individual and population-centred approaches to drawing such a distinction, and I proceed to develop the latter. On the account I advance, the differences between kin and group selection are differences of degree in the structural properties of populations. A spatial metaphor provides a useful framework for thinking about these (...)
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  15. The Inclusive Fitness Controversy: Finding a Way Forward.Jonathan Birch - 2017 - Royal Society Open Science 4:170335.
    This paper attempts to reconcile critics and defenders of inclusive fitness by constructing a synthesis that does justice to the insights of both. I argue that criticisms of the regression-based version of Hamilton’s rule, although they undermine its use for predictive purposes, do not undermine its use as an organizing framework for social evolution research. I argue that the assumptions underlying the concept of inclusive fitness, conceived as a causal property of an individual organism, are unlikely to be exactly true (...)
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  16. The Philosophy of Social Evolution.Jonathan Birch - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    From mitochondria to meerkats, the natural world is full of spectacular examples of social behaviour. In the early 1960s W. D. Hamilton changed the way we think about how such behaviour evolves. He introduced three key innovations - now known as Hamilton's rule, kin selection, and inclusive fitness - and his pioneering work kick-started a research program now known as social evolution theory. This is a book about the philosophical foundations and future prospects of that program.
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  17. Hamilton's Rule and Its Discontents.Jonathan Birch - 2014 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (2):381-411.
    In an incendiary 2010 Nature article, M. A. Nowak, C. E. Tarnita, and E. O. Wilson present a savage critique of the best-known and most widely used framework for the study of social evolution, W. D. Hamilton’s theory of kin selection. More than a hundred biologists have since rallied to the theory’s defence, but Nowak et al. maintain that their arguments ‘stand unrefuted’. Here I consider the most contentious claim Nowak et al. defend: that Hamilton’s rule, the core explanatory principle (...)
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  18. Explaining the Human Syndrome. [REVIEW]Jonathan Birch - 2013 - Metascience 22 (2):347-350.
  19. Samir Okasha and Ken Binmore (Eds) Evolution and Rationality: Decisions, Cooperation, and Strategic Behaviour. [REVIEW]Jonathan Birch - 2013 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (3):669-673.
    Evolution and Rationality marks the end of a three-year project, ‘Evolution, Cooperation, and Rationality’, directed at the University of Bristol by the book’s editors, Samir Okasha and Ken Binmore. The collection draws together the editors’ pick of the papers delivered at the conferences the project hosted, and covers a wide range of topics at the intersection of evolutionary theory and the social sciences. It is a splendid anthology: timely, interdisciplinary, thematically cohesive, and full of substantive and interesting disagreements between the (...)
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  20. Collective Action in the Fraternal Transitions.Jonathan Birch - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (3):363-380.
    Inclusive fitness theory was not originally designed to explain the major transitions in evolution, but there is a growing consensus that it has the resources to do so. My aim in this paper is to highlight, in a constructive spirit, the puzzles and challenges that remain. I first consider the distinctive aspects of the cooperative interactions we see within the most complex social groups in nature: multicellular organisms and eusocial insect colonies. I then focus on one aspect in particular: the (...)
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  21. Queller's Separation Condition Explained and Defended.Jonathan Birch & James A. R. Marshall - 2014 - American Naturalist 184 (4):531-540.
    The theories of inclusive fitness and multilevel selection provide alternative perspectives on social evolution. The question of whether these perspectives are of equal generality remains a divisive issue. In an analysis based on the Price equation, Queller argued (by means of a principle he called the separation condition) that the two approaches are subject to the same limitations, arising from their fundamentally quantitative-genetical character. Recently, van Veelen et al. have challenged Queller’s results, using this as the basis for a broader (...)
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  22. Research Styles and the Reception of Sociobiology.L. Boon & H. Smit - 1989 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 19 (1):19-40.
  23. Marxism and Human Sociobiology: A Comparative Study From the Perspective of Modern Socialist Economic Reforms. [REVIEW]Zhang Boshu - 1987 - Biology and Philosophy 2 (4):463-474.
    Modern socialist economic reforms which center on the establishment of a commodity based economic system, demand a reconsideration of human nature. Marxism and human sociobiology give different answers to questions about human nature, but neither is complete in itself. It seems timely, therefore, to suggest that a combination of biological understanding with a Marxist-based social understanding would produce a more adequate notion of human nature, thereby helping us to resolve a number of problems posed by reforms currently taking place in (...)
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  24. The Gospel According to Sociobiology.Douglas H. Boucher - 1981 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 25 (1):63-65.
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  25. The Aeolian Harp: Sociobiology and Human Judgment.J. W. Bowker - 1980 - Zygon 15 (3):307-333.
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  26. Was Thomas Aquinas a Sociobiologist? Thomistic Natural Law, Rational Goods, and Sociobiology.Craig A. Boyd - 2004 - Zygon 39 (3):659-680.
  27. The Homeopathy of Kin Selection: An Evaluation of van den Berghe’s Sociobiological Approach to Ethnic Nepotism.Ingo Brigandt - 2001 - Politics and the Life Sciences 20:203–215.
    The present discussion of sociobiological approaches to ethnic nepotism takes Pierre van den Berghe ʼs theory as a starting point. Two points, which have not been addressed in former analyses, are considered to be of particular importance. It is argued that the behavioral mechanism of ethnic nepotism—as understood by van den Berghe—cannot explain ethnic boundaries and attitudes. In addition, I show that van den Bergheʼs central premise concerning ethnic nepotism is in contradiction to Hamiltonʼs formula, the essential principle of kin (...)
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  28. Do Deconstructive Ecology and Sociobiology Undermine Leopold's Land Ethic?J. Baird Callicott - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (4):353-372.
    Recent deconstructive developments in ecology (doubts about the existence of unified communities and ecosystems, the diversity-stability hypothesis, and a natural homeostasis or “balance of nature”; and an emphasis on “chaos,” “perturbation,” and directionless change in living nature) and the advent of sociobiology (selfish genes) may seem to undermine the scientific foundations of environmental ethics, especially the Leopold land ethic. A reassessment of the Leopold land ethic in light of these developments (and vice versa) indicates that the land ethic is still (...)
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  29. Book Review:Sociobiology Edward O. Wilson. [REVIEW]Arthur Caplan - 1976 - Philosophy of Science 43 (2):305-.
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  30. Sociobiology as a Strategy in Science.Arthur L. Caplan - 1984 - The Monist 67 (2):143-160.
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  31. Book Review:Sociobiology and the Preemption of Social Science. Alexander Rosenberg; The Expanding Circle: Ethics and Sociobiology. Peter Singer. [REVIEW]Arthur L. Caplan - 1983 - Ethics 93 (3):603-.
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  32. Analytical Marxism and Historical Materialism: The Debate on Social Evolution.Alan Carling - 1993 - Science and Society 57 (1):31 - 65.
    Darwinian evolutionary theory marries a genetic account of the origin of species to a selectionist account of their subsequent fate. The Marxian theory of history is analogous: class struggle provides an account of the origins of new regimes of production and selection pressures explain their subsequent history. The theory is technologically determinist, but there are three distinct doctrines ascribing primacy in different ways to the technological forces of production over the social relations of production. Natural Primacy is probably true but (...)
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  33. Cultural Transmission and Social Control of Human Behavior.Castro Laureano, Castro-Nogueira Luis, A. Castro-Nogueira Miguel & A. Toro Miguel - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):347-360.
    Humans have developed the capacity to approve or disapprove of the behavior of their children and of unrelated individuals. The ability to approve or disapprove transformed social learning into a system of cumulative cultural inheritance, because it increased the reliability of cultural transmission. Moreover, people can transmit their behavioral experiences (regarding what can and cannot be done) to their offspring, thereby avoiding the costs of a laborious, and sometimes dangerous, evaluation of different cultural alternatives. Our thesis is that, during ontogeny, (...)
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  34. A Retrospective on Sociobiology.Michael Cavanaugh - 2000 - Zygon 35 (4):813-826.
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  35. Human Sociobiology and Archaeology.J. Chapman - 1986 - In J. L. Bintliff & C. F. Gaffney (eds.), Archaeology at the Interface: Studies in Archaeology's Relationships with History, Geography, Biology, and Physical Science. B.A.R..
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  36. Evolutionary Semantics of Anthropogenesis and Bioethics of Nbic-Technologies.Valentin Cheshko, Yulia Kosova & Valery Glazko - 2015 - Biogeosystem Technique 5 (3):256-266.
    The co-evolutionary concept of tri-modal stable evolutionary strategy (SESH) of Homo sapiens is developed. The concept based on the principle of evolutionary complementarity of anthropogenesis: value of evolutionary risk and evolutionary path of human evolution are defined by descriptive (evolutionary efficiency) and creative-teleological (evolutionary correctness) parameters simultaneously, that cannot be instrumental reduced to others ones. Resulting volume of both parameters define the vectors of human evolution by two gear mechanism ˗ genetic and cultural co-evolution and techno-humanitarian balance. Explanatory model and (...)
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  37. The Science, the Ethics, the Politics: the socio-cultural aspects of modern genetics.Valentin Cheshko & Valentin Kulinichenko (eds.) - 2004 - Parapan.
    Modern genetics becomes a bridge between the natural sciences, humanities and social practtoon the social life of biomedicine and genetics this branch of science makes these branches of science by comparable in their socio-forming role to politics and economics factors. The research objective of this paper is theoretical analysis of social and cultural challenges posed by the development of basic genetics and genetic technologies. The problems of this book may be attributed to the new field of science, formed at the (...)
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  38. The Expanding Circle: Ethics and Sociobiology By Peter Singer Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1981, Xiv+190 Pp., £6.95The Shaping of Man: Philosophical Aspects of Sociobiology By Roger Trigg Oxford: Blackwell, 1982, Xx+186 Pp., £12.50, £6.95 Paper. [REVIEW]Stephen R. L. Clark - 1985 - Philosophy 60 (233):411-.
  39. Morality and Mathematics: The Evolutionary Challenge.Justin Clarke-Doane - 2012 - Ethics 122 (2):313-340.
    It is commonly suggested that evolutionary considerations generate an epistemological challenge for moral realism. At first approximation, the challenge for the moral realist is to explain our having many true moral beliefs, given that those beliefs are the products of evolutionary forces that would be indifferent to the moral truth. An important question surrounding this challenge is the extent to which it generalizes. In particular, it is of interest whether the Evolutionary Challenge for moral realism is equally a challenge for (...)
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  40. Upheavals in Biological Theory Undermine Sociobiology.Randall Collins - 1983 - Sociological Theory 1:306-318.
  41. Human Pugnacity and War: Some Anticipations of Sociobiology, 1880–1919. [REVIEW]Paul Crook - 1998 - Biology and Philosophy 13 (2):263-288.
    Almost all of the themes contained in E.O.Wilson's sociobiological writing on war and human aggression were prefigured in Anglo-American bio-social discourse, c. 1880–1919. Instinct theory – stemming from animal psychology and the genetics revolution – encouraged the belief that pugnacity had been programmed into the ancient part of the human brain as a result of evolutionary pressures dating from prehistory. War was seen to be instinct-driven, and genocidal fighting postulated as a eugenic force in early human evolution. War was explained (...)
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  42. The Sociobiology of Sociopathy: An Alternative Hypothesis.Wim E. Crusio - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):154-155.
    Mealey argued that sociopathy is an evolutionary stable strategy subject to frequency-dependent selection – high levels of sociopathy being advantageous to the individual if population-wide frequencies of it are low, and vice versa. I argue that at least one alternative hypothesis exists that explains her data equally well. Alternative hypotheses must be formulated and tested before any theory can be validated.
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  43. The Darwinian Heritage and Sociobiology [Book Review].Oliver Curry - unknown
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  44. Im Anfang War der Egoismus.Edgar Dahl - 1991 - Econ.
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  45. The Expanding Circle: Ethics and Sociobiology. By Peter Singer. New York: New American Library. 1982. [REVIEW]Peter Danielson - 1983 - Reason Papers 9:95-103.
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  46. The Importance of Human Individuality for Sociobiology.Bernard D. Davis - 1982 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 26 (1):1-18.
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  47. The Importance of Human Individuality for Sociobiology.Bernard D. Davis - 1980 - Zygon 15 (3):275-293.
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  48. The Sociology of Sociobiology.Ronald de Sousa - 1990 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 4 (3):271 – 283.
    Abstract This paper turns the tables on the criticisms of sociobiology that stem from a sociological perspective; many of those criticisms lack cogency and coherence in such measure as to demand, in their turn, a psycho?sociological explanation rather than a rational justification. This thesis, after a brief exposition of the main ideas of sociobiology, is argued in terms of four of the most prominent complaints made against it. Far from embodying tired prejudices about the psychological and sociological implications of biology, (...)
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  49. Sociobiology and Religion: A Discussion of the Issues.Daniel R. DeNicola - 1980 - Zygon 15 (4):407-423.
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  50. Der Mensch als Tier. Anmerkungen zum Programm der ‘human sociobiology’.Andreas Dorschel - 1990 - Prima Philosophia 3 (2).
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