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Shelagh Crooks [7]Shelagh Margaret Crooks [1]
  1.  43
    Teaching for Argumentative Thought.Shelagh Crooks - 2009 - Teaching Philosophy 32 (3):247-261.
    The conception of thought as a kind of argumentative dialogue has been influential in curricula designed to promote the development of thinking skills. Educators have sought to “teach” this kind of thinking by providing their students with opportunities to participate in argumentative exchange. This practice is based on the belief that thinking processes will mirror or mimic the interpersonal exchanges in which the thinker engages. In this article, another approach to teaching argumentative thought is developed. It is argued that while (...)
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  2.  54
    Developing the Critical Attitude.Shelagh Crooks - 1995 - Teaching Philosophy 18 (4):313-325.
    This paper explores the potential benefits and obstacles in the incorporation of a critical attitude in a critical thinking curriculum. Critical thinking entails more than just the transfer of information and critical thinking concepts to student within a course. The author suggests that professors should exemplify critical traits in the classroom to students as a means to develop a critical attitude or disposition. The adoption of a critical attitude encourages students to ascertain critical concepts and tools, and cultivate a critical (...)
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  3.  46
    Hume Studies Referees, 2006–2007.Margaret Atherton, Tom Beauchamp, Deborah Boyle, Emily Carson, Dorothy Coleman, Angela Coventry, Shelagh Crooks, Remy Debes, Georges Dicker & Paul Draper - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (2):385-387.
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  4.  21
    Hume, Images, and the Mental Object Problem.Shelagh Crooks - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (1):3-.
    RÉSUMÉ: L'idée que les images mentales sont des tableaux ou des objets dans l'esprit joue un rôle extrêmement important dans la conception que David Hume se fait de l'esprit et dans sa doctrine générale quant à la nature de la pensée. La question que veut explorer le présent article est la suivante: la doctrine humienne des images mentales comme objets-dans-l'esprit est-elle viable? On soutiendra qu'une défense très forte de la conception de Hume peut être aujourd'hui développée sur la base de (...)
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  5.  39
    Strong Credulity and Pro/Con Analysis.Shelagh Crooks - 2005 - Teaching Philosophy 28 (1):45-57.
    This paper inquires into the nature and causes of credulous belief and proposes a way of making negative evidence more salient to believers so that they are less likely to fall into the habit of credulous believing. Contrasting the work of Richard Swinburne with recent work in cognitive psychology, the author argues that for the “strong credulity hypothesis”, namely that our comprehension of testimony is closely linked to an initial (albeit temporary) acceptance of what speakers claim. That is, we are (...)
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  6.  17
    The Concept of Argument in Philosophy as a Threshold for Learners.Shelagh Crooks - 2020 - Teaching Philosophy 43 (1):1-27.
    It is commonplace for undergraduate students to find certain concepts inherent to the disciplines of study troublesome. While some concepts are troublesome simply because they represent new vocabulary for the students, other concepts are troublesome in a more significant sense. Concepts of this kind are troublesome because they highlight an aspect of the deep structure of the discipline, a way of thinking and inquiry, that the students are likely to find strange and even, counter-intuitive, relative to their own pre-existing conceptual (...)
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